46 Works

Data from: Where and how to restore in a changing world: a demographic-based assessment of resilience

Loralee Larios, Lauren M. Hallett & Katharine N. Suding
Managers are increasingly looking to apply concepts of resilience to better anticipate and understand conservation and restoration in a changing environment. In this study, we explore how information on demography (recruitment, growth and survival) and competitive effects in different environments and with different starting species abundances can be used to better understand resilience. We use observational and experimental data to better understand dynamics between native Stipa pulchra and exotic Avena barbata and fatua, grasses characteristic...

Data from: A genomic footprint of hybrid zone movement in crested newts

Ben Wielstra, Terry Burke, Roger K. Butlin, Aziz Avcı, Nazan Üzüm, Emin Bozkurt, Kurtuluş Olgun & Jan W. Arntzen
Speciation typically involves a stage in which species can still exchange genetic material. Interspecific gene flow is facilitated by the hybrid zones that such species establish upon secondary contact. If one member of a hybridizing species pair displaces the other, their hybrid zone would move across the landscape. Although theory predicts that moving hybrid zones quickly stagnate, hybrid zones tracked over one or a few decades do not always follow such a limitation. This suggests...

Data from: Size-dependent ejaculation strategies and reproductive success in the yellow dung fly, Scathophaga stercoraria

Brian E. Gress & Scott Pitnick
Theory predicts that sperm competition will favour the production of larger ejaculates. However, because the benefits of greater reproductive investment are balanced by the costs of spermatogenesis, expenditure should depend on male physiology, mating rate and the relationship between additional investment and fertilization gains. In the yellow dung fly, Scathophagastercoraria, males adopt size-dependent alternative mating tactics that are associated with discrete ecological resources (foraging and oviposition substrates), although males switch between these environments throughout their...

Data from: The evolution of feather coloration and song in Old World orioles (genus Oriolus)

Beata Matysiokova, Nicholas Friedman, Lucia Turčoková & Vladimir Remes
What is the tempo and mode of evolution – how fast and in what pattern do traits evolve – is a major question of evolutionary biology. Here we studied patterns of evolutionary change in visual and acoustic signals in Old World orioles. Since producing multiple signals may be costly, we also tested whether there was an evolutionary trade-off between the elaboration of those two types of signals. We studied 30 Oriolus taxa using comparative methods...

Data from: Range instability leads to cytonuclear discordance in a morphologically cryptic ground squirrel species complex

Mark A. Phuong, Ke Bi & Craig Moritz
The processes responsible for cytonuclear discordance frequently remain unclear. Here, we employed an exon capture dataset and demographic methods to test hypotheses generated by species distribution models to examine how contrasting histories of range stability vs. fluctuation have caused cytonuclear concordance and discordance in ground squirrel lineages from the Otospermophilus beecheyi species complex. Previous studies in O. beecheyi revealed three morphologically cryptic and highly divergent mitochondrial DNA lineages (named the Northern, Central, and Southern lineages...

Data from: Competition drives trait evolution and character displacement between Mimulus species along an environmental gradient

Nicholas J. Kooyers, Brooke James & Benjamin K. Blackman
Closely related species may evolve to coexist stably in sympatry through niche differentiation driven by in situ competition, a process termed character displacement. Alternatively, past evolution in allopatry may have already sufficiently reduced niche overlap to permit establishment in sympatry, a process called ecological sorting. The relative importance of each process to niche differentiation is contentious even though they are not mutually exclusive and are both mediated via multivariate trait evolution. We explore how competition...

Data from: Genetic basis of between-individual and within-individual variance of docility

Julien G.A. Martin, Enrico Pirottay, Matthew B. Petellez, Daniel T. Blumstein, J. G. A. Martin, E. Pirotta & M. B. Petelle
Between-individual variation in phenotypes within a population is the basis of evolution. However, evolutionary and behavioural ecologists have mainly focused on estimating between-individual variance in mean trait and neglected variation in within-individual variance, or predictability of a trait. In fact, an important assumption of mixed-effects models used to estimate between-individual variance in mean traits is that within-individual residual variance (predictability) is identical across individuals. Individual heterogeneity in the predictability of behaviours is a potentially important...

Data from: Genetic coupling of female mate choice with polygenic ecological divergence facilitates stickleback speciation

Rachael A. Bay, Matthew E. Arnegard, Gina L. Conte, Jacob Best, Nicole L. Bedford, Shaugnessy R. McCann, Matthew E. Dubin, Yingguang Frank Chan, Felicity C. Jones, David M. Kingsley, Dolph Schluter & Catherine L. Peichel
Ecological speciation with gene flow is widespread in nature, but it presents a conundrum: how are associations between traits under divergent natural selection and traits that contribute to assortative mating maintained? Theoretical models suggest that genetic mechanisms inhibiting free recombination between loci underlying these two types of traits (hereafter, “genetic coupling”) can facilitate speciation. Here, we perform a direct test for genetic coupling by mapping both divergent traits and female mate choice in a classic...

Data from: Seasonal variation in daily patterns of social contacts in the European badger Meles meles

Matthew J. Silk, Nicola Weber, Lucy C. Steward, Richard J. Delahay, Darren P. Croft, David J. Hodgson, Mike Boots & Robbie A. McDonald
Social interactions among hosts influence the persistence and spread of infectious pathogens. Daily and seasonal variation in the frequency and type of social interactions will play an important role in disease epidemiology and, alongside other factors, may have an influence on wider disease dynamics by causing seasonal forcing of infection, especially if the seasonal variation experienced by a population is considerable. We explored temporal variation in within-group contacts in a high-density population of European badgers...

Data from: Applying landscape genomic tools to forest management and restoration of Hawaiian koa (Acacia koa) in a changing environment

Paul F. Gugger, Christina T. Liang, Victoria L. Sork, Paul Hodgskiss & Jessica W. Wright
Identifying and quantifying the importance of environmental variables in structuring population genetic variation can help inform management decisions for conservation, restoration, or reforestation purposes, both in current and future environmental conditions. Landscape genomics offers a powerful approach for understanding the environmental factors that currently associate with genetic variation, and given those associations, where populations may be most vulnerable under future environmental change. Here, we applied genotyping by sequencing to generate over 11,000 single-nucleotide polymorphisms from...

Data from: Phylogenomic insights into the evolution of stinging wasps and the origins of ants and bees

Michael G. Branstetter, Bryan N. Danforth, James P. Pitts, Brant C. Faircloth, Philip S. Ward, Matthew L. Buffington, Michael W. Gates, Robert R. Kula & Seán G. Brady
The stinging wasps (Hymenoptera: Aculeata) are an extremely diverse lineage of hymenopteran insects, encompassing over 70,000 described species and a diversity of life history traits, including ectoparasitism, cleptoparasitism, predation, pollen feeding (bees [Anthophila] and Masarinae) and eusociality (social vespid wasps, ants, and some bees) [1]. The most well-studied lineages of Aculeata are the ants, which are ecologically dominant in most terrestrial ecosystems [2], and the bees, the most important lineage of angiosperm-pollinating insects [3]. Establishing...

Data from: The effect of DNA degradation bias in passive sampling devices on metabarcoding studies of arthropod communities and their associated microbiota

Henrik Krehenwinkel, Marisa Fong, Susan Kennedy, Edward Greg Huang, Suzuki Noriyuki, Luis Cayetano & Rosemary Gillespie
PCR amplification bias is a well-known problem in metagenomic analysis of arthropod communities. In contrast, variation of DNA degradation rates is a largely neglected source of bias. Differential degradation of DNA molecules could cause underrepresentation of taxa in a community sequencing sample. Arthropods are often collected by passive sampling devices, like malaise traps. Specimens in such a trap are exposed to varying periods of suboptimal storage and possibly different rates of DNA degradation. Degradation bias...

Data from: Declines in low-elevation subalpine tree populations outpace growth in high-elevation populations with warming

Erin Conlisk, Cristina Castanha, Matthew J. Germino, Thomas T. Veblen, Jeremy M. Smith & Lara M. Kueppers
1. Species distribution shifts in response to climate change require that recruitment increase beyond current range boundaries. For trees with long lifespans, the importance of climate-sensitive seedling establishment to the pace of range shifts has not been demonstrated quantitatively. 2. Using spatially explicit, stochastic population models combined with data from long-term forest surveys, we explored whether the climate-sensitivity of recruitment observed in climate manipulation experiments was sufficient to alter populations and elevation ranges of two...

Data from: Resistance, tolerance and environmental transmission dynamics determine host extinction risk in a load-dependent amphibian disease

Mark Q. Wilber, Roland A. Knapp, Mary Toothman & Cheryl J. Briggs
While disease-induced extinction is generally considered rare, a number of recently emerging infectious diseases with load-dependent pathology have led to extinction in wildlife populations. Transmission is a critical factor affecting disease-induced extinction, but the relative importance of transmission compared to load-dependent host resistance and tolerance is currently unknown. Using a combination of models and experiments on an amphibian species suffering extirpations from the fungal pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), we show that while transmission from an...

Data from: Joint evolution of differential seed dispersal and self-fertilization

Ryosuke Iritani, Pierre-Olivier Cheptou & P.-O. Cheptou
Differential seed dispersal, in which selfed and outcrossed seeds possess different dispersal propensities, represents a potentially important individual-level association. A variety of traits can mediate differential seed dispersal, including inflorescence and seed size variation. However, how natural selection shapes such associations is poorly known. Here, we developed theoretical models for the evolution of mating system and differential seed dispersal in metapopulations, incorporating heterogeneous pollination, dispersal cost, cost of outcrossing, and environment-dependent inbreeding depression. We considered...

Data from: The origin and evolution of coral species richness in a marine biodiversity hotspot

Danwei Huang, Emma E. Goldberg, Loke Ming Chou & Kaustuv Roy
The Coral Triangle region of the Indo-Pacific realm harbors an extraordinary number of species, with richness decreasing away from this biodiversity hotspot. Despite multiple competing hypotheses, the dynamics underlying this regional diversity pattern remain poorly understood. Here we use a time-calibrated evolutionary tree of living reef coral species, their current geographic ranges, and model-based estimates of regional rates of speciation, extinction, and geographic range shifts to show that origination rates within the Coral Triangle are...

Data from: The effect of nitrogen availability and water conditions on competition between a facultative CAM plant and an invasive grass

Kailiang Yu, Paolo D'Odorico, David E. Carr, Ashden Personius & Scott L. Collins
Abstract Plants with crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) are increasing their abundance in drylands worldwide. The drivers and mechanisms underlying the increased dominance of CAM plants and CAM expression (i.e., nocturnal carboxylation) in facultative CAM plants, however, remain poorly understood. We investigated how nutrient and water availability affected competition between Mesembryanthemum crystallinum (a model facultative CAM species) and the invasive C3 grass Bromus mollis that co-occur in California's coastal grasslands. Specifically we investigated the extent to...

Data from: Environmental stress linked to consumption of maternally derived carotenoids in brown trout embryos (Salmo trutta)

Laetitia G. E. Wilkins, Lucas Marques Da Cunha, Gaëtan Glauser, Armelle Vallat & Claus Wedekind
The yellow, orange, or red colors of salmonid eggs are due to maternally derived carotenoids whose functions are not sufficiently understood yet. Here, we studied the significance of naturally acquired carotenoids as maternal environmental effects during embryo development in brown trout (Salmo trutta). We collected eggs from wild females, quantified their egg carotenoid content, fertilized them in vitro in full-factorial breeding blocks to separate maternal from paternal effects, and raised 3,278 embryos singly at various...

Data from: A new genus of horse from Pleistocene North America

Peter D. Heintzman, Grant D. Zazula, Ross D.E. MacPhee, Eric Scott, James A. Cahill, Brianna K. McHorse, Joshua D. Kapp, Mathias Stiller, Matthew J. Wooller, Ludovic Orlando, John R. Southon, Duane G. Froese, Beth Shapiro & John Southon
The extinct “New World stilt-legged”, or NWSL, equids constitute a perplexing group of Pleistocene horses endemic to North America. Their slender distal limb bones resemble those of Asiatic asses, such as the Persian onager. Previous palaeogenetic studies, however, have suggested a closer relationship to caballine horses than to Asiatic asses. Here, we report complete mitochondrial and partial nuclear genomes from NWSL equids from across their geographic range. Although multiple NWSL equid species have been named,...

Data from: Non-random dispersal mediates invader impacts on the invertebrate community

Julien Cote, Tomas Brodin, Sean Fogarty & Andrew Sih
(1) Dispersers are often not a random draw from a population, dispersal propensity being conditional on individual phenotypic traits and local conditions. This non-randomness consequently results in phenotypic differences between dispersers and non-dispersers and, in the context of biological invasions, in an invasion front made of individuals with a biased phenotype. This bias of phenotypes at the front may subsequently modulate the strength of ecological effects of an invasive species on invaded communities. (2) We...

Data from: Transcriptome-wide patterns of divergence during allopatric evolution

Ricardo J. Pereira, Felipe S. Barreto, N. Tessa Pierce, Miguel Carneiro & Ronald S. Burton
Recent studies have revealed repeated patterns of genomic divergence associated with species formation. Such patterns suggest that natural selection tends to target a set of available genes, but is also indicative that closely related taxa share evolutionary constraints that limit genetic variability. Studying patterns of genomic divergence among populations within the same species may shed light on the underlying evolutionary processes. Here, we examine transcriptome-wide divergence and polymorphism in the marine copepod Tigriopus californicus, a...

Data from: Selection for collective aggressiveness favors social susceptibility in social spiders

Jonathan N. Pruitt, Colin M. Wright, James L. L. Lichtenstein, Gregory T. Chism, Brendan L. McEwen, Ambika Kamath & Noa Pinter-Wollman
Particularly socially influential individuals are present in many groups, but it is unclear whether their emergence is determined by their social influence versus the social susceptibility of others. The social spider Stegodyphus dumicola shows regional variation in apparent leader-follower dynamics. We use this variation to evaluate the relative contributions of leader social influence versus follower social susceptibility in driving this social order. Using chimeric colonies that combine potential leaders and followers, we discover that leader-follower...

Data from: Spatial dynamics of habitat use informs reintroduction efforts in the presence of an invasive predator

Evan M. Rehm, Mallory B. Balsat, Nathan P. Lemoine & Julie A. Savidge
1. Islands experience major impacts from introduced species, especially nocturnal predators. The Brown Treesnake (Boiga irregularis) extirpated almost the entire native avifauna on Guam shortly after introduction. Reintroductions from neighboring islands can restore bird communities but will take place in heavily managed units where snake populations can be controlled. Yet reintroductions often proceed without relevant biological information such as nocturnal habitat and space use when nocturnal predators are present. To guide efforts, we studied diurnal...

Data from: Incremental analysis of vertebral centra can reconstruct the stable isotope chronology of teleost fishes

Jun Matsubayashi, Yu Saitoh, Yutaka Osada, Yoshitoshi Uehara, Junko Habu, Tsuyoshi Sasaki & Ichiro Tayasu
1. Isotope analysis has high potential for understanding fish ecology and food-web structure in aquatic ecosystems. The utility of isotope analysis will be greatly improved if we can reconstruct the chronology of several isotopes at multiple growth stages of individual fish. However, no practical methods exist for reconstructing the chronology of light-element isotopes (e.g. δ13C, δ15N, δ34S, and Δ14C) in teleost fishes. Here, we present and test a new analytical approach for reconstructing the isotopic...

Data from: MHC class II DRB diversity predicts antigen recognition and is associated with disease severity in California sea lions naturally infected with Leptospira interrogans

Karina Acevedo-Whitehouse, Frances M. D. Gulland & Lizabeth Bowen
We examined the associations between California sea lion MHC class II DRB (Zaca-DRB) configuration and diversity, and leptospirosis. As Zaca-DRB gene sequences are involved with antigen presentation of bacteria and other extracellular pathogens, we predicted that they would play a role in determining responses to these pathogenic spirochaetes. Specifically, we investigated whether Zaca-DRB diversity (number of genes) and configuration (presence of specific genes) explained differences in disease severity, and whether higher levels of Zaca-DRB diversity...

Registration Year

  • 2017
    46

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    46

Affiliations

  • University of California System
    46
  • University of California, Berkeley
    9
  • Southwest Fisheries Science Center
    4
  • University of Alaska Fairbanks
    3
  • University of Colorado Boulder
    3
  • University of California, Irvine
    3
  • University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
    2
  • University of Virginia
    2
  • University of Gothenburg
    2
  • Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
    2