3 Works

Data from: An integrative skeletal and paleogenomic analysis of stature variation suggests relatively reduced health for early European farmers

Stephanie Marciniak, Christina Bergey, Ana Maria Silva, Agata Hałuszko, Mirosław Furmanek, Barbara Veselka, Petr Velemínský, Giuseppe Vercellotti, Joachim Wahl, Gunita Zarina, Cristina Longhi, Jan Kolář, Rafael Garrido-Pena, Raúl Flores-Fernández, Ana M. Herrero-Corral, Angela Simalcsik, Werner Müller, Alison Sheridan, Žydrūnė Miliauskienė, Rimantas Jankauskas, Vyacheslav Moiseyev, Kitti Köhler, Ágnes Király, Beatriz Gamarra, Olivia Cheronet … & George H. Perry
Human culture, biology, and health were shaped dramatically by the onset of agriculture ~12,000 years before present (BP). This shift is hypothesized to have resulted in increased individual fitness and population growth as evidenced by archaeological and population genomic data alongside a decline in physiological health as inferred from skeletal remains. Here, we consider osteological and ancient DNA data from the same prehistoric individuals to study human stature variation as a proxy for health across...

Phenotypic plasticity determines differences between the skulls of tigers from mainland Asia

David Cooper, Nobuyuki Yamaguchi, David Macdonald, Olga Nanova, Viktor Yudin, Andrew Dugmore & Andrew Kitchener
Tiger subspecific taxonomy is controversial because of morphological and genetic variation found between now fragmented populations, yet the extent to which phenotypic plasticity or genetic variation affects phenotypes of putative tiger subspecies has not been explicitly addressed. In order to assess the role of phenotypic plasticity in determining skull variation, we compared skull morphology amongst continental tigers from zoos and the wild. In turn, we examine continental tiger skulls from across their wild range, to...

Larval parasitism in a specialist herbivore is explained by phenological synchrony and host plant availability

Constanti Stefanescu, Pau Colom, José Miguel Barea-Azcón, David Horsfield, Benjamin Komac, Adrià Miralles, Mark R. Shaw, Andreu Ubach & David Gutiérrez
Parasitism is a key factor in the population dynamics of many herbivorous insects, although its impact on host populations varies widely, for instance, along latitudinal and altitudinal gradients. Understanding the sources of geographical variation in host-parasitoid interactions is crucial for reliably predicting the future success of the interacting species under a context of global change. Here, we examine larval parasitism in the butterfly Aglais urticae in south-west Europe, where it is a mountain specialist. Larval...

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  • 2022
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  • National Museums Scotland
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  • Institute for Anthropological Research
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  • Vrije Universiteit Brussel
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  • Rovira i Virgili University
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  • The Ohio State University
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  • University of Neuchâtel
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  • University of Wrocław
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  • Mediterranean Institute for Advanced Studies
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  • Autonomous University of Madrid
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  • Eötvös Loránd University
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