53 Works

Data from: Large wildlife removal drives immune defense increases in rodents

Hillary S. Young, Rodolfo Dirzo, Kristofer M. Helgen, Douglas J. McCauley, Charles L. Nunn, Paul Snyder, Kari E. Veblen, Serena Zhao & Vanessa O. Ezenwa
Anthropogenic disturbances involving land use change, climate disruption, pollution, and invasive species have been shown to impact immune function of wild animals. These immune changes have direct impacts on the fitness of impacted animals and, also, potentially indirect effects on other species and on ecological processes, notably involving the spread of infectious disease. Here, we investigate whether the selective loss of large wildlife can also drive changes in immune function of other consumer species. Using...

Data from: Using the Phenoscape Knowledgebase to relate genetic perturbations to phenotypic evolution

Prashanti Manda, James P. Balhoff, Hilmar Lapp, Paula Mabee & Todd J. Vision
The abundance of phenotypic diversity among species can enrich our knowledge of development and genetics beyond the limits of variation that can be observed in model organisms. The Phenoscape Knowledgebase (KB) is designed to enable exploration and discovery of phenotypic variation among species. Because phenotypes in the KB are annotated using standard ontologies, evolutionary phenotypes can be compared with phenotypes from genetic perturbations in model organisms. To illustrate the power of this approach, we review...

Data from: Fluctuating, warm temperatures decrease the effect of a key floral repressor on flowering time in Arabidopsis thaliana

Liana T. Burghardt, Daniel E. Runcie, Amity M. Wilczek, Martha D. Cooper, Judith L. Roe, Stephen M. Welch & Johanna Schmitt
The genetic basis of growth and development is often studied in constant laboratory environments; however, the environmental conditions that organisms experience in nature are often much more dynamic. We examined how daily temperature fluctuations, average temperature, day length and vernalization influence the flowering time of 59 genotypes of Arabidopsis thaliana with allelic perturbations known to affect flowering time. For a subset of genotypes, we also assessed treatment effects on morphology and growth. We identified 17...

Data from: Thermodynamic constraints on the utility of ecological stoichiometry for explaining global biogeochemical patterns

Ashley M. Helton, Marcelo Ardon & Emily S. Bernhardt
Carbon and nitrogen cycles are coupled through both stoichiometric requirements for microbial biomass and dissimilatory metabolic processes in which microbes catalyse reduction-oxidation reactions. Here, we integrate stoichiometric theory and thermodynamic principles to explain the commonly observed trade-off between high nitrate and high organic carbon concentrations, and the even stronger trade-off between high nitrate and high ammonium concentrations, across a wide range of aquatic ecosystems. Our results suggest these relationships are the emergent properties of both...

Data from: Genetic stock composition of marine bycatch reveals disproportional impacts on depleted river herring genetic stocks

Daniel J. Hasselman, Eric C. Anderson, Emily E. Argo, N. David Bethoney, Stephen R. Gephard, David M. Post, Bradley P. Schondelmeier, Thomas F. Schultz, Theodore V. Willis & Eric P. Palkovacs
Bycatch of mid-trophic level anadromous fishes that connect marine and freshwater ecosystems is a growing conservation concern. Anadromous alewife (Alosa pseudoharengus) and blueback herring (A. aestivalis) are important components of coastal freshwater and marine food webs, but have experienced dramatic declines in the abundances of spawning adults. Freshwater-focused restoration efforts have yielded few consistent signs of recovery; raising concerns that bycatch in Northwest Atlantic commercial fisheries may be negating these conservation actions. Using data from...

Data from: Multiple environmental drivers structure plant traits at the community level in a pyrogenic ecosystem

Gregory M. Ames, Steven M. Anderson & Justin P. Wright
Trait-based approaches offer a way to predict changes in community structure along environmental gradients using measurable properties of individuals. Promoted as being generalizable across systems, trait-based approaches benefit from information about the environmental drivers of trait variation, how they interact and how they change with scale. However, for most diverse, natural communities, it is largely unknown whether the relationships between leaf-level traits and interacting environmental drivers (e.g. fire, water availability) are influenced by the scale...

Data from: Disruption of endosperm development is a major cause of hybrid seed inviability between Mimulus guttatus and Mimulus nudatus

Elen Oneal, John H. Willis & Robert G. Franks
Divergence of developmental mechanisms within populations could lead to hybrid developmental failure, and might be a factor driving speciation in angiosperms. We investigate patterns of endosperm and embryo development in Mimulus guttatus and the closely related, serpentine endemic Mimulus nudatus, and compare them to those of reciprocal hybrid seed. We address whether disruption in hybrid seed development is the primary source of reproductive isolation between these sympatric taxa. M. guttatus and M. nudatus differ in...

Data from: Illegal tusk harvest and the decline of tusk size in the African elephant

Patrick I. Chiyo, Vincent Obanda & David K. Korir
Harvesting of wild populations can cause the evolution of morphological, behavioral, and life history traits that may compromise natural or sexual selection. Despite the vulnerability of large mammals to rapid population decline from harvesting, the evolutionary effects of harvesting on mega-fauna have received limited attention. In elephants, illegal ivory harvesting disproportionately affects older age classes and males because they carry large tusks, but its' effects on tusk size for age or tusk size for stature...

Data from: Bonobos and chimpanzees exhibit human-like framing effects

Christopher Krupenye, Alexandra G. Rosati & Brian Hare
Humans exhibit framing effects when making choices, appraising decisions involving losses differently from those involving gains. To directly test for the evolutionary origin of this bias, we examined decision-making in humans' closest living relatives: bonobos (Pan paniscus) and chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes). We presented the largest sample of non-humans to date (n = 40) with a simple task requiring minimal experience. Apes made choices between a ‘framed’ option that provided preferred food, and an alternative option...

Data from: Natural variation, differentiation and genetic tradeoffs of ecophysiological traits in response to water limitation in Brachypodium distachyon and its descendent allotetraploid B. hybridum (Poaceae)

Antonio J. Manzaneda, Pedro José Rey, Jill Theresa Anderson, Evan Raskin, Christopher Weiss-Lehman & Thomas Mitchell-Olds
Differences in tolerance to water stress may underlie ecological divergence of closely-related ploidy lineages. However, the mechanistic basis of physiological variation governing eco-geographical cytotype segregation is not well understood. Here, using Brachypodium distachyon and its derived allotetraploid B. hybridum as model, we test the hypothesis that, for heteroploid annuals, ecological divergence of polyploids in drier environments is based on trait differentiation enabling drought-escape. We demonstrate that under water limitation allotetraploids maintain higher photosynthesis and stomatal...

Data from: Phylogeny and biogeography of the American live oaks (Quercus subsection Virentes): a genomic and population genetics approach

Jeannine Cavender-Bares, Antonio González-Rodríguez, Deren A. R. Eaton, Andrew A. L. Hipp, Anne Beulke & Paul S. Manos
The nature and timing of evolution of niche differentiation among closely related species remains an important question in ecology and evolution. The American live oak clade, Virentes, which spans the unglaciated temperate and tropical regions of North America and Mesoamerica, provides an instructive system in which to examine speciation and niche evolution. We generated a fossil-calibrated phylogeny of Virentes using RADseq data to estimate divergence times and used nuclear microsatellites, chloroplast sequences and an intron...

Data from: An archive of longitudinal recordings of the vocalizations of adult Gombe chimpanzees

Frans X. Plooij, Hetty Van De Rijt-Plooij, Martha Fischer & Anne Pusey
Studies of chimpanzee vocal communication provide valuable insights into the evolution of communication in complex societies, and also comparative data for understanding the evolution of human language. One particularly valuable dataset of recordings from free-living chimpanzees was collected by Frans X. Plooij and the late Hetty van de Rijt-Plooij at Gombe National Park, Tanzania (1971–73). These audio specimens, which have not yet been analysed, total over 10 h on 28 tapes, including 7 tapes focusing...

Data from: Baby on board: olfactory cues indicate pregnancy and fetal sex in a non-human primate

Jeremy Chase Crawford & Christine M. Drea
Olfactory cues play an integral, albeit underappreciated, role in mediating vertebrate social and reproductive behaviour. These cues fluctuate with the signaller's hormonal condition, coincident with and informative about relevant aspects of its reproductive state, such as pubertal onset, change in season and, in females, timing of ovulation. Although pregnancy dramatically alters a female's endocrine profiles, which can be further influenced by fetal sex, the relationship between gestation and olfactory cues is poorly understood. We therefore...

Data from: Resource base influences genome-wide DNA methylation levels in wild baboons (Papio cynocephalus)

Amanda J. Lea, Jeanne Altmann, Susan C. Alberts & Jenny Tung
Variation in resource availability commonly exerts strong effects on fitness-related traits in wild animals. However, we know little about the molecular mechanisms that mediate these effects, or about their persistence over time. To address these questions, we profiled genome-wide whole blood DNA methylation levels in two sets of wild baboons: (i) ‘wild-feeding’ baboons that foraged naturally in a savanna environment and (ii) ‘Lodge’ baboons that had ready access to spatially concentrated human food scraps, resulting...

Data from: Assessing the utility of whole genome amplified DNA for next-generation molecular ecology

Christopher Blair, C. Ryan Campbell & Anne D. Yoder
DNA quantity can be a hindrance in ecological and evolutionary research programmes due to a range of factors including endangered status of target organisms, available tissue type, and the impact of field conditions on preservation methods. A potential solution to low-quantity DNA lies in whole genome amplification (WGA) techniques that can substantially increase DNA yield. To date, few studies have rigorously examined sequence bias that might result from WGA and next-generation sequencing of nonmodel taxa....

Data from: From a line in the sand to a landscape of decisions: a Hierarchical Diversity Decision Framework (HiDDeF) for estimating and communicating biodiversity loss along anthropogenic gradients

Kristofor A. Voss, Ryan S. King & Emily S. Bernhardt
1. In setting water quality criteria, managers must choose thresholds for stressors that are protective of aquatic biodiversity. Setting such thresholds requires making implicit judgments about the degree of biodiversity loss that managers are willing to accept. 2. We present a new modeling approach, the Hierarchical Diversity Decision Framework model (HiDDeF) that explicitly communicates the sensitivity of water quality benchmarks to these implicit judgements. We apply HiDDeF to a dataset of stream macroinvertebrate abundances across...

Data from: Genetic isolation between two recently diverged populations of a symbiotic fungus

Sara Branco, Pierre Gladieux, Christopher E. Ellison, Alan Kuo, Kurt LaButii, Anna Lipzen, Igor V. Grigoriev, Hui-Ling Liao, Rytas Vilgalys, Kabir G. Peay, John W. Taylor, Thomas D. Bruns & Kurt LaButti
Fungi are an omnipresent and highly diverse group of organisms, making up a significant part of eukaryotic diversity. Little is currently known about the drivers of fungal population differentiation and subsequent divergence of species, particularly in symbiotic, mycorrhizal fungi. Here, we investigate the population structure and environmental adaptation in Suillus brevipes (Peck) Kuntze, a wind-dispersed soil fungus that is symbiotic with pine trees. We assembled and annotated the reference genome for Su. brevipes and resequenced...

Data from: Whole genome resequencing reveals extensive natural variation in the model green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

Jonathan M. Flowers, Khaled M. Hazzouri, Gina M. Pham, Ulises Rosas, Tayebeh Bahmani, Basel Khraiwesh, David R. Nelson, Kenan Jijakli, Rasha Abdrabu, Elizabeth H. Harris, Paul A. Lefebvre, Erik F. Y. Hom, Kourosh Salehi-Ashtiani & Michael D. Purugganan
We performed whole-genome resequencing of 12 field isolates and eight commonly studied laboratory strains of the model organism Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to characterize genomic diversity and provide a resource for studies of natural variation. Our data support previous observations that Chlamydomonas is among the most diverse eukaryotic species. Nucleotide diversity is ∼3% and is geographically structured in North America with some evidence of admixture among sampling locales. Examination of predicted loss-of-function mutations in field isolates indicates...

Data from: Synthesis of phylogeny and taxonomy into a comprehensive tree of life

Cody E. Hinchliff, Stephen A. Smith, James F. Allman, J. Gordon Burleigh, Ruchi Chaudhary, Lyndon M. Coghill, Keith A. Crandall, Jiabin Deng, Bryan T. Drew, Romina Gazis, Karl Gude, David S. Hibbett, Laura A. Katz, , Emily Jane McTavish, Peter E. Midford, Christopher L. Owen, Richard H. Ree, Jonathan A. Rees, Douglas E. Soltis, Tiffani Williams & Karen Ann Cranston
Reconstructing the phylogenetic relationships that unite all lineages (the tree of life) is a grand challenge. The paucity of homologous character data across disparately related lineages currently renders direct phylogenetic inference untenable. To reconstruct a comprehensive tree of life, we therefore synthesized published phylogenies, together with taxonomic classifications for taxa never incorporated into a phylogeny. We present a draft tree containing 2.3 million tips—the Open Tree of Life. Realization of this tree required the assembly...

Data from: Genetic diversity does not explain variation in extra-pair paternity in multiple populations of a songbird

Irene A. Liu, James E. Johndrow, James Abe, Stefan Lüpold, Ken Yasukawa, David F. Westneat & Stephen Nowicki
Many songbirds are socially monogamous but genetically polyandrous, mating with individuals outside their pair bonds. Extra-pair paternity (EPP) varies within and across species, but reasons for this variation remain unclear. One possible source of variation is population genetic diversity, which has been shown in interspecific meta-analyses to correlate with EPP but which has limited support from intraspecific tests. Using eight populations of the genetically polyandrous red-winged blackbird (Agelaius phoeniceus), including an island population, we investigated...

Data from: Optimal group size in a highly social mammal

A. Catherine Markham, Laurence R. Gesquiere, Susan C. Alberts & Jeanne Altmann
What are the costs and benefits for animals living in groups of different sizes? Balancing the trade-offs between within-group competition (which favors smaller groups) and between-group competition (which favors larger groups) suggests that intermediate-sized groups may be best, yet empirical support for this prediction has largely been lacking. Using long-term data on wild baboons, we provide novel evidence that individuals living in intermediate-sized groups have energetically optimal space-use strategies and lower glucocorticoid (stress hormone) concentrations...

Data from: Self-organizing dominance hierarchies in a wild primate population

Mathias Franz, Emily McLean, Jenny Tung, Jeanne Altmann & Susan C. Alberts
Linear dominance hierarchies, which are common in social animals, can profoundly influence access to limited resources, reproductive opportunities and health. In spite of their importance, the mechanisms that govern the dynamics of such hierarchies remain unclear. Two hypotheses explain how linear hierarchies might emerge and change over time. The ‘prior attributes hypothesis’ posits that individual differences in fighting ability directly determine dominance ranks. By contrast, the ‘social dynamics hypothesis’ posits that dominance ranks emerge from...

Data from: Mainland size variation informs predictive models of exceptional insular body size change in rodents

Paul A. P. Durst & V. Louise Roth
The tendency for island populations of mammalian taxa to diverge in body size from their mainland counterparts consistently in particular directions is both impressive for its regularity and, especially among rodents, troublesome for its exceptions. However, previous studies have largely ignored mainland body size variation, treating size differences of any magnitude as equally noteworthy. Here, we use distributions of mainland population body sizes to identify island populations as ‘extremely’ big or small, and we compare...

Data from: Charting the complete elastic properties of inorganic crystalline compounds

Maarten De Jong, Wei Chen, Thomas Angsten, Anubhav Jain, Randy Notestine, Anthony Gamst, Marcel Sluiter, Chaitanya Krishna Ande, Sybrand Van Der Zwaag, Jose J. Plata, Cormac Toher, Stefano Curtarolo, Gerbrand Ceder, Kristin A. Persson & Mark Asta
The elastic constant tensor of an inorganic compound provides a complete description of the response of the material to external stresses in the elastic limit. It thus provides fundamental insight into the nature of the bonding in the material, and it is known to correlate with many mechanical properties. Despite the importance of the elastic constant tensor, it has been measured for a very small fraction of all known inorganic compounds, a situation that limits...

Data from: Social networks predict gut microbiome composition in wild baboons

Jenny Tung, Luis B. Barriero, Michael B. Burns, J. C. Grenier, Josh Lynch, Laura E Grieneisen, Jeanne Altmann, Susan C Alberts, Ran Blekhman, Elizabeth A Archie & Jean-Christophe Grenier
Social relationships have profound effects on health in humans and other primates, but the mechanisms that explain this relationship are not well understood. Using shotgun metagenomic data from wild baboons, we found that social group membership and social network relationships predicted both the taxonomic structure of the gut microbiome and the structure of genes encoded by gut microbial species. Rates of interaction directly explained variation in the gut microbiome, even after controlling for diet, kinship,...

Registration Year

  • 2015
    53

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    53

Affiliations

  • Duke University
    53
  • University of California, Berkeley
    6
  • Princeton University
    5
  • University of Alberta
    3
  • University of Minnesota
    3
  • Institute of Primate Research
    3
  • Smithsonian Institution
    3
  • Yale University
    3
  • The Bronx Defenders
    2
  • Stanford University
    2