54 Works

Data from: Mesoscale activity facilitates energy gain in a top predator

Briana Abrahms, Kylie L. Scales, Elliott L. Hazen, Steven J. Bograd, Robert S. Schick, Patrick W. Robinson & Daniel P. Costa
How animal movement decisions interact with the distribution of resources to shape individual performance is a key question in ecology. However, links between spatial and behavioural ecology and fitness consequences are poorly understood because the outcomes of individual resource selection decisions, such as energy intake, are rarely measured. In the open ocean, mesoscale features (~10-100 km) such as fronts and eddies can aggregate prey and thereby drive the distribution of foraging vertebrates through bottom-up biophysical...

Evaluating the effects of land-use change and future climate change on vulnerability of coastal landscapes to saltwater intrusion

Abinash Bhattachan, Ryan Emanuel, Marcelo Ardon, Emily Bernhardt, Steven Anderson, Matthew Stillwagon, Emily Ury, Todd Bendor & Justin Wright
The exposure of freshwater-dependent coastal ecosystems to saltwater is a present-day impact of climate and land-use changes in many coastal regions, with the potential to harm freshwater and terrestrial biota, alter biogeochemical cycles and reduce agricultural yields. Land-use activities associated with artificial drainage infrastructure (canals, ditches, and drains) could exacerbate saltwater exposure. However, studies assessing the effects of artificial drainage on the vulnerability of coastal landscapes to saltwater exposure are lacking. We examined the extent...

Data from: Local fields in human subthalamic nucleus track the lead-up to impulsive choices

John M. Pearson, Patrick T. Hickey, Shivanand P. Lad, Michael L. Platt & Dennis A. Turner
The ability to adaptively minimize not only motor but cognitive symptoms of neurological diseases, such as Parkinson's Disease (PD) and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), is a primary goal of next-generation deep brain stimulation (DBS) devices. On the basis of studies demonstrating a link between beta-band synchronization and severity of motor symptoms in PD, the minimization of beta band activity has been proposed as a potential training target for closed-loop DBS. At present, no comparable signal is...

Data from: Variations in age- and sex-specific survival rates help explain population trend in a discrete marine mammal population

Mònica Arso Civil, Barbara Cheney, Nicola J. Quick, Valentina Islas-Villanueva, Jeff A. Graves, Vincent M. Janik, Paul M. Thompson & Phillip S. Hammond
1. Understanding the drivers underlying fluctuations in the size of animal populations is central to ecology, conservation biology and wildlife management. Reliable estimates of survival probabilities are key to population viability assessments, and patterns of variation in survival can help inferring the causal factors behind detected changes in population size. 2. We investigated whether variation in age and sex-specific survival probabilities could help explain the increasing trend in population size detected in a small, discrete...

Data from: Leaf nutrients, not specific leaf area, are consistent indicators of elevated nutrient inputs

Jennifer Firn, James M. McGree, Eric Harvey, Habacuc Flores-Moreno, Martin Schütz, Yvonne M. Buckley, Elizabeth T. Borer, Eric W. Seabloom, Kimberly J. La Pierre, Andrew M. MacDougall, Suzanne M. Prober, Carly J. Stevens, Lauren L. Sullivan, Erica Porter, Emma Ladouceur, Charlotte Allen, Karine H. Moromizato, John W. Morgan, W. Stanley Harpole, Yann Hautier, Nico Eisenhauer, Justin P. Wright, Peter B. Adler, Carlos Alberto Arnillas, Jonathan D. Bakker … & Anita C. Risch
Leaf traits are frequently measured in ecology to provide a ‘common currency’ for predicting how anthropogenic pressures impact ecosystem function. Here, we test whether leaf traits consistently respond to experimental treatments across 27 globally distributed grassland sites across 4 continents. We find that specific leaf area (leaf area per unit mass)—a commonly measured morphological trait inferring shifts between plant growth strategies—did not respond to up to four years of soil nutrient additions. Leaf nitrogen, phosphorus...

Data from: Ecological differentiation facilitates fine-scale coexistence of sexual and asexual Boechera

Catherine A. Rushworth, Michael D. Windham, Rose A. Keith & Tom Mitchell-Olds
Premise of the study: Ecological differentiation (ED) between sexual and asexual organisms may permit the maintenance of reproductive polymorphism. Several studies of sexual/asexual ED in plants have shown that the geographic ranges of asexuals extend beyond those of sexuals, often in areas of higher latitude or elevation. But very little is known about ED at fine scales, wherein coexistence of sexuals and asexuals may be permitted by differential niche occupation. Methods: We used 149 populations...

Data from: Host associated bacterial community succession during amphibian development

Tiffany L. Prest, Abigail K. Kimball, Jordan G. Kueneman & Valerie J. Mckenzie
Amphibians undergo significant developmental changes during their life cycle, as they typically move from a primarily aquatic environment to a more terrestrial one. Amphibian skin is a mucosal tissue that assembles communities of symbiotic microbiota. However, it is currently not well understood as to where amphibians acquire their skin symbionts, and whether the sources of microbial symbionts change throughout development. In this study, we utilized data collected from four wild boreal toad populations (Anaxyrus boreas);...

Data from: Chronic exposure of Hawaii Island spinner dolphins (Stenella longirostris) to human activities

Julian A. Tyne, Fredrik Christiansen, Heather L. Heenehan, David W. Johnston & Lars Bejder
Habitat selection is strongly influenced by spatial variations in habitat quality and predation risk. Repeated exposure of wildlife to anthropogenic activities in important habitats may affect habitat selection, leading to negative biological consequences. We quantified the cumulative human exposure of a small, genetically-isolated and behaviourally-constrained spinner dolphin (Stenella longirostris) population, off Hawaii Island, and exposure effects on their daytime cumulative activity budget. Dolphins were exposed to human activities within 100m for 82.7% of the daytime,...

Data from: Measuring visual search and distraction in immersive virtual reality

Bettina Olk, Alina Dinu, David J. Zielinski & Regis Kopper
An important issue of psychological research is how experiments conducted in the laboratory or theories based on such experiments relate to human performance in daily life. Immersive virtual reality (VR) allows control over stimuli and conditions at increased ecological validity. The goal of the present study was to accomplish a transfer of traditional paradigms that assess attention and distraction to immersive VR. To further increase ecological validity we explored attentional effects with daily objects as...

Data from: Estimation of energetic condition in wild baboons using fecal thyroid hormone determination

Laurence R. Gesquiere, Mya Pugh, Susan C. Alberts & A. Catherine Markham
Understanding how environmental and social factors affect reproduction through variation in energetic condition remains understudied in wild animals, in large part because accurately and repeatedly measuring energetic condition in the wild is a challenge. Thyroid hormones (THs), such as triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4), have a key role in mitigating metabolic responses to energy intake and expenditure, and therefore are considered important biomarkers of an animal's energetic condition. Recent method development has shown that T3...

Data from: Contemporaneous radiations of fungi and plants linked to symbiosis

François Lutzoni, Michael D. Nowak, Michael E. Alfaro, Valérie Reeb, Jolanta Miadlikowska, Michael Krug, A. Elizabeth Arnold, Louise A. Lewis, David L. Swofford, David Hibbett, Khidir Hilu, Timothy Y. James, Dietmar Quandt & Susana Magallón
Interactions between fungi and plants, including parasitism, mutualism, and saprotrophy, have been invoked as key to their respective macroevolutionary success. Here we evaluate the origins of plant-fungal symbioses and saprotrophy using a time-calibrated phylogenetic framework that reveals linked and drastic shifts in diversification rates of each kingdom. Fungal colonization of land was associated with at least two origins of terrestrial green algae and preceded embryophytes (as evidenced by losses of fungal flagellum, ca. 720 Ma),...

Data from: Deep phenotyping in zebrafish reveals genetic and diet-induced adiposity changes that may inform disease risk

James E.N. Minchin, Catherine M. Scahill, Nicole Staudt, Elisabeth M. Busch-Nentwich & John F. Rawls
The regional distribution of adipose tissues is implicated in a wide range of diseases. For example, proportional increases in visceral adipose tissue increase the risk for insulin resistance, diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Zebrafish offer a tractable model system by which to obtain unbiased and quantitative phenotypic information on regional adiposity, and deep phenotyping can explore complex disease-related adiposity traits. To facilitate deep phenotyping of zebrafish adiposity traits, we used pairwise correlations between 67 adiposity traits...

Data from: Extremely fast feeding strikes are powered by elastic recoil in a seahorse relative, the snipefish, Macroramphosus scolopax

Sarah J. Longo, Tyler Goodearly & Peter C. Wainwright
Among over 30,000 species of ray-finned fishes, seahorses and pipefishes have a unique feeding mechanism whereby the elastic recoil of tendons allows them to rotate their long snouts extremely rapidly in order to capture small elusive prey. To understand the evolutionary origins of this feeding mechanism, its phylogenetic distribution among closely related lineages must be assessed. We present evidence for elastic recoil powered feeding in the snipefish (Macroramphosus scolopax) from kinematics, dynamics, and morphology. High-speed...

Data from: Improving rational use of ACTs through diagnosis-dependent subsidies: evidence from a cluster-randomized controlled trial in western Kenya

Wendy Prudhomme O'Meara, Diana Menya, Jeremiah Laktabai, Alyssa Platt, Indrani Saran, Elisa Maffioli, Joseph Kipkoech, Manoj Mohanan, Elizabeth L. Turner & Wendy Prudhomme O’Meara
Background: More than half of artemisinin combination therapies (ACTs) consumed globally are dispensed in the retail sector where diagnostic testing is uncommon, leading to overconsumption and poor targeting. In many malaria-endemic countries, ACTs sold over-the-counter are available at heavily subsidized prices, further contributing to their misuse. Inappropriate use of ACTs can have serious implications for the spread of drug resistance and leads to poor outcomes for non-malaria patients treated with incorrect drugs. We evaluated the...

Data from: Responses of aerial insectivorous bats to local and landscape-level features of coffee agroforestry systems in Western Ghats, India

Shasank Ongole, Mahesh Sankaran & Krithi K. Karanth
Shade coffee has shown great promise in providing crucial habitats for biodiversity outside formal protected areas. Insectivorous bats have been understudied in coffee, although they may provide pest control services. We investigated the influence of local and landscape-level features of coffee farms on aerial insectivorous bats in Chikmagalur district in the Western Ghats biodiversity hotspot, India. Bats were monitored in 20 farm sites using ultrasound detectors, and the response of bat species richness and activity...

Data from: Interbirth intervals in wild baboons: environmental predictors and hormonal correlates

Laurence R. Gesquiere, Jeanne Altmann, Elizabeth A. Archie & Susan C. Alberts
Objectives: Interbirth intervals (IBIs) are a key metric of female reproductive success; understanding how they are regulated by environmental, social, and demographic factors can provide insight into sources of variance in female fitness. Materials and Methods: Using 36 years of reproductive data on 490 IBIs for 160 wild female baboons, we identified sources of variance in the duration of IBIs and of their component phases: postpartum amenorrhea (PPA), sexual cycling, and pregnancy. We also examined...

Data from: Genome-wide analysis of SNPs is consistent with no domestic dog ancestry in the endangered Mexican wolf (Canis lupus baileyi)

Robert R. Fitak, Sarah E. Rinkevich & Melanie Culver
The Mexican gray wolf (Canis lupus baileyi) was historically distributed throughout the southwestern United States and northern Mexico. Extensive predator removal campaigns during the early 20th century, however, resulted in its eventual extirpation by the mid 1980s. At this time, the Mexican wolf existed only in three separate captive lineages (McBride, Ghost Ranch, and Aragón) descended from three, two, and two founders, respectively. These lineages were merged in 1995 to increase the available genetic variation,...

Data from: Urbanization and anticoagulant poisons promote immune dysfunction in bobcats

Laurel E.K. Serieys, Amanda J. Lea, Marta Epeldegui, Tiffany C. Armenta, Joanne Moriarty, Sue Vandewoude, Scott Carver, Janet Foley, Robert K. Wayne, Seth P.D. Riley, Christel H. Uittenbogaart, Laurel E. K. Serieys & Seth P. D. Riley
Understanding how human activities influence immune response to environmental stressors can support biodiversity conservation across increasingly urbanizing landscapes. We studied a bobcat (Lynx rufus) population in urban southern California that experienced a rapid population decline from 2002–2005 due to notoedric mange. Because anticoagulant rodenticide (AR) exposure was an underlying complication in mange deaths, we aimed to understand sublethal contributions of urbanization and ARs on 65 biochemical markers of immune and organ function. Variance in immunological...

Data from: Moving in the Anthropocene: global reductions in terrestrial mammalian movements

Marlee A. Tucker, Katrin Böhning-Gaese, William F. Fagan, John M. Fryxell, Bram Van Moorter, Susan C. Alberts, Abdullahi H. Ali, Andrew M. Allen, Nina Attias, Tal Avgar, Hattie Bartlam-Brooks, Buuveibaatar Bayarbaatar, Jerrold L. Belant, Alessandra Bertassoni, Dean Beyer, Laura Bidner, Floris M. Van Beest, Stephen Blake, Niels Blaum, Chloe Bracis, Danielle Brown, P. J. Nico De Bruyn, Francesca Cagnacci, Justin M. Calabrese, Constança Camilo-Alves … & Thomas Mueller
Animal movement is fundamental for ecosystem functioning and species survival, yet the effects of the anthropogenic footprint on animal movements have not been estimated across species. Using a unique GPS-tracking database of 803 individuals across 57 species, we found that movements of mammals in areas with a comparatively high human footprint were on average one-half to one-third the extent of their movements in areas with a low human footprint. We attribute this reduction to behavioral...

Data from: Using phylogenomic data to explore the effects of relaxed clocks and calibration strategies on divergence time estimation: primates as a test case

Mario Dos Reis, Gregg F. Gunnell, Jose Barba-Montoya, Alex Wilkins, Ziheng Yang & Anne D. Yoder
Primates have long been a test case for the development of phylogenetic methods for divergence time estimation. Despite a large number of studies, however, the timing of origination of crown Primates relative to the K-Pg boundary and the timing of diversification of the main crown groups remain controversial. Here we analysed a dataset of 372 taxa (367 Primates and 5 outgroups, 3.4 million aligned base pairs) that includes nine primate genomes. We systematically explore the...

Data from: Herbivory enhances the resistance of mangrove forest to cordgrass invasion

Yihui Zhang, Hanyu Meng, Yi Wang & Qiang He
The biotic resistance hypothesis proposes that biotic interactions, such as competition and herbivory, resist the establishment and spread of non-native species. The relative and interactive role of competition and herbivory in resisting plant invasions, however, remains poorly understood. We investigated the interactive role of competition and herbivory (by the native rodent Rattus losea) in resisting Spartina alterniflora (cordgrass) invasions into mangrove forests. In southern China, although exotic cordgrass numerically dominates intertidal mudflats and open gaps...

Data from: SNP-skimming: a fast approach to map loci generating quantitative variation in natural populations

Carrie A. Wessinger, John K. Kelly, Peng Jiang, Mark D. Rausher, Lena C. Hileman & Carolyn A. Wessinger
Genome-wide association mapping (GWAS) is a method to estimate the contribution of segregating genetic loci to trait variation. A major challenge for applying GWAS to non-model species has been generating dense genome-wide markers that satisfy the key requirement that marker data is error-free. Here we present an approach to map loci within natural populations using inexpensive shallow genome sequencing. This 'SNP skimming' approach involves two steps: an initial genome-wide scan to identify putative targets followed...

Data from: Speciation in sympatry with ongoing secondary gene flow and an olfactory trigger in a radiation of Cameroon cichlids

Jelmer W. Poelstra, Emilie J. Richards & Christopher H. Martin
The process of sympatric speciation in nature remains a fundamental unsolved problem. Cameroon crater lake cichlid radiations were long regarded as one of the most compelling examples; however, recent work showed that their origins were more complex than a single colonization event followed by isolation. Here, we performed a detailed investigation of the speciation history of a radiation of Coptodon cichlids from Lake Ejagham using whole-genome sequencing data. The existence of this radiation is remarkable...

Data from: Computational biomechanical analyses demonstrate similar shell-crushing abilities in modern and ancient arthropods

Russell D. C. Bicknell, Justin A. Ledogar, Stephen Wroe, Benjamin C. Gutzler, Winsor H. Watson, John R. Paterson & Winsor H. Watson
The biology of the extant American horseshoe crab, Limulus polyphemus, is well documented—including its dietary habits, particularly the ability to crush shell with its gnathobasic walking appendages—but virtually nothing is known about the feeding biomechanics of this iconic arthropod. This species is also considered the archetypal functional analogue for a range of extinct groups that have gnathobasic appendages, including eurypterids, trilobites, and some of the earliest arthropods, especially Sidneyia inexpectans from the middle Cambrian (508...

Data from: Costs of injury for scent signalling in a strepsirrhine primate

Rachel L. Harris, Marylène Boulet, Kathleen E. Grogan & Christine M. Drea
Honesty is crucial in animal communication when signallers are conveying information about their condition. Condition dependence implies a cost to signal production; yet, evidence of such cost is scarce. We examined the effects of naturally occurring injury on the quality and salience of olfactory signals in ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta). Over a decade, we collected genital secretions from 23 (13 male, 10 female) adults across 34 unique injuries, owing primarily to intra-group fights. Using gas...

Registration Year

  • 2018
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Resource Types

  • Dataset
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Affiliations

  • Duke University
    54
  • Princeton University
    4
  • University of North Carolina
    4
  • University of British Columbia
    4
  • University of Pennsylvania
    3
  • University of Washington
    3
  • University of Pretoria
    3
  • Field Museum of Natural History
    3
  • University of Minnesota
    3
  • University of California, Davis
    3