31 Works

Data from: Costs and drivers of helminth parasite infection in wild female baboons

Mercy Y. Akinyi, David Jansen, Bobby Habig, Laurence Gesquiere, Susan C. Alberts & Elizabeth A. Archie
1. Helminth parasites can have wide ranging, detrimental effects on host reproduction and survival. These effects are best documented in humans and domestic animals, while only a few studies in wild mammals have identified both the forces that drive helminth infection risk and their costs to individual fitness. 2. Working in a well-studied population of wild baboons (Papio cynocephalus) in the Amboseli ecosystem in Kenya, we pursued two goals, to: (i) examine the costs of...

Data from: Comparative genomic analysis of the pheromone receptor Class 1 family (V1R) reveals extreme complexity in mouse lemurs (genus, Microcebus) and a chromosomal hotspot across mammals

Kelsie E Hunnicutt, George P Tiley, Rachel C Williams, Peter A Larsen, Marina B Blanco, Rodin M Rasoloarison, Christopher Ryan Campbell, Kevin Zhu, David W Weisrock, Hiroaki Matsunami & Anne D Yoder
Sensory gene families are of special interest, both for what they can tell us about molecular evolution, and for what they imply as mediators of social communication. The vomeronasal type-1 receptors (V1Rs) have often been hypothesized as playing a fundamental role in driving or maintaining species boundaries given their likely function as mediators of intraspecific mate choice, particularly in nocturnal mammals. Here, we employ a comparative genomic approach for revealing patterns of V1R evolution within...

Convergent evolution in lemur environmental niches

James Herrera
Aim: To test the hypothesis that adaptive convergent evolution of climate niches occurred in multiple independent lemur lineages. Location: Madagascar Taxon: Lemurs Methods: I collected climate and altitude data from WorldClim and summarized the niches of almost all living lemurs (83 species) into phylogenetically-controlled principal components. To test for convergent evolution, I searched for multiple, similar climate optima using multi-peak Ornstein-Uhlenbeck models (surface, l1-ou, bayou). I compared the observed level of climate convergence to that...

Biotic and anthropogenic forces rival climatic/abiotic factors in determining global plant population growth and fitness

William Morris
Multiple, simultaneous environmental changes, in climatic/abiotic factors, in interacting species, and in direct human influences, are impacting natural populations and thus biodiversity, ecosystem services, and evolutionary trajectories. Determining whether the magnitudes of the population impacts of abiotic, biotic, and anthropogenic drivers differ, accounting for their direct effects and effects mediated through other drivers, would allow us to better predict population fates and design mitigation strategies. We compiled 644 paired values of the population growth rate...

Data from: Functional trait evolution in Sphagnum peat mosses and its relationship to niche construction

Bryan T. Piatkowski & A. Jonathan Shaw
Species in the genus Sphagnum create, maintain, and dominate boreal peatlands through ‘extended phenotypes’ that allow these organisms to engineer peatland ecosystems and thereby impact global biogeochemical cycles. One such phenotype is the production of peat, or incompletely decomposed biomass, that accumulates when rates of growth exceed decomposition. Interspecific variation in peat production is thought to be responsible for the establishment and maintenance of ecological gradients, such as the microtopographic hummock-hollow gradient, along which sympatric...

Data from: Quality and quantity of genetic relatedness data affect the analysis of social structure

Vivienne Foroughirad, Alexis Levengood, Janet Mann & Celine H. Frère
Kinship plays a fundamental role in the evolution of social systems and is considered a key driver of group living. To understand the role of kinship in the formation and maintenance of social bonds, accurate measures of genetic relatedness are critical. Genotype-by-sequencing technologies are rapidly advancing the accuracy and precision of genetic relatedness estimates for wild populations. The ability to assign kinship from genetic data varies depending on a species’ or population’s mating system and...

Data from: Resolution of the ordinal phylogeny of mosses using targeted exons from organellar and nuclear genomes

Yang Liu, Matthew G. Johnson, Cymon J. Cox, Rafael Medina, Nicolas Devos, Alain Vanderpoorten, Lars Hedenäs, Neil E. Bell, James R. Shevock, Blanka Aguero, Dietmar Quandt, Norman J. Wickett, A. Jonathan Shaw & Bernard Goffinet
Mosses are a highly diverse lineage of land plants, whose diversification, spanning at least 400 million years, remains phylogenetically ambiguous due to the lack of fossils, massive early extinctions, late radiations, limited morphological variation, and conflicting signal among previously used markers. Here, we present phylogenetic reconstructions based on complete organellar exomes and a comparable set of nuclear genes for this major lineage of land plants. Our analysis of 142 species representing 29 of the 30...

Data from: Context-dependent scaling of kinematics and energetics during contests and feeding in mantis shrimp

P.A. Green, M.J. McHenry & S.N. Patek
Measurements of energy use, and its scaling with size, are critical to understanding how organisms accomplish myriad tasks. For example, energy budgets are central to game theory models of assessment during contests and underlie patterns of feeding behavior. Clear tests connecting energy to behavioral theory require measurements of the energy use of single individuals for particular behaviors. Many species of mantis shrimp (Stomatopoda: Crustacea) use elastic energy storage to power high-speed strikes that they deliver...

Data from: Can the environment have a genetic basis? a case study of seedling establishment in Arabidopsis thaliana

Michelle C. D'Aguillo, Brianne R. Edwards & Kathleen Donohue
The timing of seed germination determines the environment experienced by a plant’s most vulnerable life stage—the seedling. Germination is environmentally cued, and genotypes can differ in their sensitivity to environmental cues. When genotypes differ in their response to cues, and when cues accurately predict the post-germination environment, the post-germination environment experienced by seedlings can itself have a genetic basis and potential to evolve. We tested for genetic differences in the post-germination environment using Arabidopsis thaliana...

Data from: High fat diet induces microbiota-dependent silencing of enteroendocrine cells

John Rawls, Lihua Ye, Olaf Mueller, Jennifer Bagwell, Michel Bagnat & Rodger Liddle
Enteroendocrine cells (EECs) are specialized sensory cells in the intestinal epithelium that sense and transduce nutrient information. Consumption of dietary fat contributes to metabolic disorders, but EEC adaptations to high fat feeding were unknown. Here, we established a new experimental system to directly investigate EEC activity in vivo using a zebrafish reporter of EEC calcium signaling. Our results reveal that high fat feeding alters EEC morphology and converts them into a nutrient insensitive state that...

Data from: A logical model of homology for comparative biology

Paula Mabee, James Balhoff, Wasila Dahdul, Hilmar Lapp, Christopher Mungall & Todd Vision
There is a growing body of research on the evolution of anatomy in a wide variety of organisms. Discoveries in this field could be greatly accelerated by computational methods and resources that enable these findings to be compared across different studies and different organisms and linked with the genes responsible for anatomical modifications. Homology is a key concept in comparative anatomy; two important types are historical homology (the similarity of organisms due to common ancestry)...

Integrating climate adaptation and biodiversity conservation in the global ocean

Derek Tittensor, Maria Beger, Kristina Boerder, Daniel Boyce, Rachel Cavanagh, Aurelie Cosandey-Godin, Guillermo Crespo, Daniel Dunn, Wildan Ghiffary, Susie Grant, Lee Hannah, Pat Halpin, Mike Harfoot, Susan Heaslip, Nicholas Jeffery, Naomi Kingston, Heike Lotze, Jennifer McGowan, Elizabeth McLeod, Chris McOwen, Bethan O'Leary, Laurenne Schiller, Ryan Stanley, Maxine Westhead, Kristen Wilson … & Boris Worm
The impacts of climate change and the socioecological challenges they present are ubiquitous and increasingly severe. Practical efforts to operationalize climate-responsive design and management in the global network of marine protected areas (MPAs) are required to ensure long-term effectiveness for safeguarding marine biodiversity and ecosystem services. Here, we review progress in integrating climate change adaptation into MPA design and management and provide eight recommendations to expedite this process. Climate-smart management objectives should become the default...

Comparative skeletal anatomy of neonatal ursids and the extreme altriciality of the giant panda

Peishu Li & Kathleen Smith
Vertebrate neonates are born with a wide range of maturity at birth. Altricial newborns are born with limited sensory agency and require significant parental care, while precocial neonates are relatively mature physically and often capable of independent function. In extant mammals, placental newborns span this range, while marsupials and monotremes are all extremely altricial at birth. Bears (family Ursidae) have one of the lowest neonatal-maternal mass ratios in placental mammals and are considered to have...

Data from: Eulerian videography technology improves classification of sleep architecture in primates

Emilie M. Melvin, David R. Samson & Charles L. Nunn
Sleep is a critically important dimension of primate behavior, ecology, and evolution, yet primate sleep is under-studied because current methods of analyzing sleep are expensive, invasive, and time-consuming. In contrast to electroencephalography (EEG) and actigraphy, videography is a cost-effective and non-invasive method to study sleep architecture in animals. With video data, however, it is challenging to score subtle changes that occur in different sleep states, and technology has lagged behind innovations in EEG and actigraphy....

Social bonds fail to mediate the connection between early adversity and fecal glucocorticoids in wild baboons

Shuxi Zeng
Code scripts for "Social bonds fail to mediate the connection between early adversity and fecal glucocorticoids in wild baboons ".

Data from: Phylogenomic delineation of Physcomitrium (Bryophyta: Funariaceae) based on targeted sequencing of nuclear exons and their flanking regions rejects the retention of Physcomitrella, Physcomitridium and Aphanorrhegma

Rafael Medina, Matthew G. Johnson, Yang Liu, Norman J. Wickett, A. Jonathan Shaw & Bernard Goffinet
Selection on spore dispersal mechanisms in mosses is thought to shape the transformation of the sporophyte. The majority of extant mosses develop a sporangium that dehisces through the loss of an operculum, and regulates spore release through the movement of articulate teeth, the peristome, lining the capsule mouth. Such complexity was acquired by the Mesozoic Era, but was lost in some groups during subsequent diversification events, challenging the resolution of the affinities for taxa with...

Data from: Male-mediated prenatal loss: functions and mechanisms

Matthew Zipple, Eila K. Roberts, Susan C. Alberts & Jacinta C. Beehner
Sexually selected infanticide has been the subject of intense empirical and theoretical study for decades; a related phenomenon, male-mediated prenatal loss, has received much less attention in evolutionary studies. Male-mediated prenatal loss occurs when inseminated or pregnant females terminate reproductive effort following exposure to a non-sire male, either through implantation failure or pregnancy termination. Male-mediated prenatal loss encompasses two sub-phenomena: sexually selected feticide and the Bruce effect. In this review, we lay out a framework...

Data from: Intestinal Serum Amyloid A suppresses systemic neutrophil activation and bactericidal activity in response to microbiota colonization

Caitlin Murdoch, Scott Espenschied, Molly Matty, Olaf Mueller, David Tobin & John Rawls
The intestinal microbiota influences the development and function of myeloid lineages such as neutrophils, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are unresolved. Using gnotobiotic zebrafish, we identified the immune effector Serum amyloid A (Saa) as one of the most highly induced transcripts in digestive tissues following microbiota colonization. Saa is a conserved secreted protein produced in the intestine and liver with described effects on neutrophils in vitro, however its in vivo functions remain poorly defined. We...

Data from: Statistical structure of locomotion and its modulation by odors

Liangyu Tao, Siddhi Ozarkar, Jeffrey M. Beck & Vikas Bhandawat
Most behaviors such as making tea are not stereotypical but have an obvious structure. However, analytical methods to objectively extract structure from non-stereotyped behaviors are immature. In this study, we analyze the locomotion of fruit flies and show that this non-stereotyped behavior is well-described by a Hierarchical Hidden Markov Model (HHMM). HHMM shows that a fly's locomotion can be decomposed into a few locomotor features, and odors modulate locomotion by altering the time a fly...

Data from: Genomic signatures of GPCR expansions reveal functional transitions in the evolution of cephalopod signal transduction

Elena A. Ritschard, Robert R. Fitak, Oleg Simakov & Sönke Johnsen
Coleoid cephalopods show unique morphological and neural novelties, such as arms with tactile and chemosensory suckers and a large complex nervous system. The evolution of such cephalopod novelties has been attributed at a genomic level to independent gene family expansions, yet the exact association and the evolutionary timing remain unclear. In the octopus genome, one such expansion occurred in the G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) repertoire, a superfamily of proteins that mediate signal transduction. Here we...

Data from: Multi-scale predictors of parasite risk in wild male savanna baboons (Papio cynocephalus)

Bobby Habig, David A.W.A.M. Jansen, Mercy Y. Akinyi, Laurence R. Gesquiere, Susan C. Alberts & Elizabeth A. Archie
Several factors are thought to shape male parasite risk in polygynous and polygynandrous mammals, including male-male competition, investment in potentially immunosuppressive hormones, and dispersal. Parasitism is also driven by processes occurring at larger scales, including host social groups and populations. To date, studies that test parasite-related costs of male behavior at all three scales—individual hosts, social groups, and the host population—remain rare. To fill this gap, we investigated multi-scale predictors of helminth parasitism in 97...

Sounds of senescence: Male swamp sparrows respond less aggressively to the song of older individuals

Matthew Zipple, Susan Peters, William Searcy & Stephen Nowicki
Age-related changes in assessment signals occur in a diverse array of animals, including humans. Age-related decline in vocal quality in humans is known to affect perceived attractiveness by potential mates and voters, but whether such changes have functional implications for non-human animals is poorly understood. Most studies of age-related change in animal signals focus on increases in signal quality that occur soon after the age of first breeding (“delayed maturation”), but a few have shown...

Data from: Diving behavior of Cuvier's beaked whales (Ziphius cavirostris) off Cape Hatteras, North Carolina

Jeanne M. Shearer, Nicola J. Quick, William R. Cioffi, Robin W. Baird, Daniel L. Webster, Heather J. Foley, Zachary T. Swaim, Danielle M. Waples, Joel T. Bell & Andrew J. Read
Cuvier’s beaked whales exhibit exceptionally long and deep foraging dives. The species is relatively little studied due to their deep-water, offshore distribution and limited time spent at the surface. We used LIMPET satellite tags to study the diving behavior of Cuvier's beaked whales off Cape Hatteras, North Carolina from 2014 to 2016. We deployed 11 tags, recording 3,242 hours of behavior data, encompassing 5,926 dives. Dive types were highly bimodal; deep dives (>800m, n=1,408) had...

Data from: Improving structured population models with more realistic representations of non-normal growth

Megan L. Peterson, William Morris, Cristina Linares & Daniel Doak
1. Structured population models are among the most widely used tools in ecology and evolution. Integral projection models (IPMs) use continuous representations of how survival, reproduction, and growth change as functions of state variables such as size, requiring fewer parameters to be estimated than projection matrix models (PPMs). Yet almost all published IPMs make an important assumption: that size-dependent growth transitions are or can be transformed to be normally distributed. In fact, many organisms exhibit...

Data from: Computational 3D histological phenotyping of whole zebrafish by X-ray histotomography

Yifu Ding, Daniel J Vanselow, Maksim A Yakovlev, Spencer R Katz, Alex Y Lin, Darin P Clark, Phillip Vargas, Xuying Xin, Jean E Copper, Victor A Canfield, Khai C Ang, Yuxin Wang, Xianghui Xiao, Francesco De Carlo, Damian B Van Rossum, Patrick La Riviere & Keith Cheng
Organismal phenotypes frequently involve multiple organ systems. Histology is a powerful way to detect cellular and tissue phenotypes, but is largely descriptive and subjective. To determine how synchrotron-based X-ray micro-tomography (micro-CT) can yield 3-dimensional whole-organism images suitable for quantitative histological phenotyping, we scanned whole zebrafish, a small vertebrate model with diverse tissues, at ~1 micron voxel resolutions. Using micro-CT optimized for cellular characterization (histo-tomography), brain nuclei can be computationally segmented and assigned to brain regions....

Registration Year

  • 2019
    31

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    31

Affiliations

  • Duke University
    31
  • University of Notre Dame
    3
  • University of Minnesota
    2
  • University of Chicago
    2
  • University of Connecticut
    2
  • Michigan State University
    2
  • University of South Dakota
    1
  • University of Liège
    1
  • The Nature Conservancy
    1
  • University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
    1