4 Works

Maintaining genetic integrity with high promiscuity: Frequent hybridization with low introgression in multiple hybrid zones of Melocactus(Cactaceae)

Khan Gulzar, Evandro Marsola De Moraes, Fernando Faria Franco, Gislaine A.R. Silva, Juliana R. Bombonato, Marlon Machado, Diego P. Alonso, Paulo E.M. Ribolla & Dirk C. Albach
Hybridization and introgression between species in contact/hybrid zones provide important insight into the genetic and ecological mechanisms of speciation. Cactaceae represents the most important radiation of true succulent angiosperms in the New World. This diversification continues to date, with species experiencing few intrinsic barriers to gene flow and the frequent occurrence of natural hybridization. Here, we used RAD-Seq single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data to investigate the genetic architecture of hybridization in four hybrid zones hosting Melocactus...

FragSAD: A database of diversity and species abundance distributions from habitat fragments

Jonathan M. Chase, Mario Liebergesell, Alban Sagouis, Felix May, Shane A. Blowes, Åke Berg, Enrico Bernard, Berry J. Brosi, Marc W. Cadotte, Luis Cayuela, Adriano G. Chiarello, Jean-François Cosson, Will Cresswell, Filibus Danjuma Dami, Jens Dauber, Christopher R. Dickman, Raphael K. Didham, David P. Edwards, Fabio Z. Farneda, Yoni Gavish, Thiago Gonçalves-Souza, Demetrio Luis Guadagnin, Mickaël Henry, Adrià López-Baucells, Heike Kappes … & Yaron Ziv
Habitat destruction is the single greatest anthropogenic threat to biodiversity. Decades of research on this issue have led to the accumulation of hundreds of data sets comparing species assemblages in larger, intact, habitats to smaller, more fragmented, habitats. Despite this, little synthesis or consensus has been achieved, primarily because of non‐standardized sampling methodology and analyses of notoriously scale‐dependent response variables (i.e., species richness). To be able to compare and contrast the results of habitat fragmentation...

A new approach to map landscape variation in forest restoration success in tropical and temperate forest biomes

Renato Crouzeilles, Felipe S. M. Barros, Paulo G. Molin, Mariana S. Ferreira, André B. Junqueira, Robin L. Chazdon, David B. Lindenmayer, Julio R. C. Tymus, Bernardo B. N. Strassburg & Pedro H. S. Brancalion
A high level of variation of biodiversity recovery within a landscape during forest restoration presents obstacles to ensure large‐scale, cost‐effective and long‐lasting ecological restoration. There is an urgent need to predict landscape variation in forest restoration success at a global scale. We conducted a meta‐analysis comprising 135 study landscapes to predict and map landscape variation in forest restoration success in tropical and temperate forest biomes. Our analysis was based on the amount of forest cover...

Importance of spatio-temporal connectivity to maintain species experiencing range shifts

Jun-Long Huang, Marco Andrello, Alexandre Martensen, Santiago Saura, Dian-Feng Liu, Jian-Hua He & Marie-Josée Fortin
Climate change can affect the habitat resources available to species by changing habitat quantity, suitability and spatial configuration, which largely determine population persistence in the landscape. In this context, dispersal is a central process for species to track their niche. Assessments of the amount of reachable habitat (ARH) using static snap-shots do not account, however, for the temporal overlap of habitat patches that may enhance stepping-stone effects. Here, we quantified the impacts of climate change...

Registration Year

  • 2019
    4

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    4

Affiliations

  • Federal University of São Carlos
    4
  • Universidade do Oeste Paulista
    2
  • University of Toronto
    2
  • Oeko Institut
    1
  • Sao Paulo State University
    1
  • University of Jos
    1
  • The Nature Conservancy
    1
  • Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro
    1
  • University of Lisbon
    1
  • Hessische Hochschule für Polizei und Verwaltung
    1