3 Works

Data from: How diverse is Mitopus morio? Integrative taxonomy detects cryptic species in a small-scale sample of a widespread harvestman

Wolfgang Arthofer, Hannes Rauch, Barbara Thaler-Knoflach, Karl Moder, Christoph Muster, Birgit C. Schlick-Steiner & Florian M. Steiner
Mitopus morio is a widespread harvestman species occurring in most of Europe and in moderate and cold-moderate zones of Asia and North America. The species is characterized by extreme variability in body size and leg length. As leg length is correlated with habitat temperature, M. morio has been considered as an example of Allen's rule. Recently, observations for a single location in Tyrol, Austria, indicated the absence of mating between short- and long-legged individuals. This...

Data from: Diversity and palaeoecology of the enigmatic genus Knebelia (Eucrustacea, Decapoda, Eryonidae) from Upper Jurassic plattenkalks in southern Germany

Denis Audo, Günter Schweigert, Joachim T. Haug, Carolin Haug, Jean-Paul Saint Martin & Sylvain Charbonnier
For a long time, the genus Knebelia Van Straelen, 1922 has comprised two species of eryonid lobster, K. bilobata (Münster, 1839) and K. schuberti (Meyer, 1836), both recorded exclusively from Late Jurassic Lagerstätten in southern Germany. Recently, the latter has been suggested to represent a juvenile individual of Cycleryon propinquus (Schlotheim, 1822). A re-examination of the type and new material has led to our rejection of that interpretation and confirmation of assignment of this species...

Data from: Gene transfer from bacteria and archaea facilitated evolution of an extremophilic eukaryote

Gerald Schönknecht, Wei-Hua Chen, Chad M. Ternes, Guillaume G. Barbier, Roshan P. Shrestha, Mario Stanke, Andrea Bräutigam, Brett J. Baker, Jillian F. Banfield, R. Michael Garavito, Kevin Carr, Curtis Wilkerson, Stefan A. Rensing, David Gagneul, Nicholas E. Dickenson, Christine Oesterhelt, Martin J. Lercher & Andreas P. M. Weber
Some microbial eukaryotes, such as the extremophilic red alga Galdieria sulphuraria, can live in hot, toxic metal-rich, acidic environments. To elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms of adaptation, we sequenced the 13.7 Mb genome of G. sulphuraria. This alga shows an enormous metabolic flexibility, growing either photoautotrophically or heterotrophically on more than 50 carbon sources. Environmental adaptation seems to have been facilitated by horizontal gene transfer from various bacteria and archaea, often followed by gene family...

Registration Year

  • 2013
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Affiliations

  • University of Greifswald
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  • University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
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  • Department of Plant Biology
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  • University of California, Berkeley
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  • Oklahoma State University
    1
  • University of Freiburg
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  • French National Centre for Scientific Research
    1
  • German Diabetes Center - Leibniz Institute for Diabetes Research at Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf
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  • Museum für Naturkunde
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  • University of Innsbruck
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