58 Works

Data from: Is population structure in the European white stork determined by flyway permeability rather than translocation history?

Jill M. Shephard, Rob Ogden, Piotr Tryjanowski, Ola Olsson & Peter Galbusera
European white stork are long considered to diverge to eastern and western migration pools as a result of independent overwintering flyways. In relatively recent times, the western and northern distribution has been subject to dramatic population declines and country-specific extirpations. A number of independent reintroduction programs were started in the mid 1950s to bring storks back to historical ranges. Founder individuals were sourced opportunistically from the Eastern and Western European distributions and Algeria, leading to...

Data from: Reconstructing the demographic history of orang-utans using approximate Bayesian computation

Alexander Nater, Maja P. Greminger, Natasha Arora, Carel P. Van Schaik, Benoit Goossens, Ian Singleton, Ernst J. Verschoor, Kristen S. Warren, Michael Krützen & Kristin S. Warren
Investigating how different evolutionary forces have shaped patterns of DNA variation within and among species requires detailed knowledge of their demographic history. Orang-utans, whose distribution is currently restricted to the Southeast Asian islands of Borneo (Pongo pygmaeus) and Sumatra (Pongo abelii), have likely experienced a complex demographic history, influenced by recurrent changes in climate and sea levels, volcanic activities and anthropogenic pressures. Using the most extensive sample set of wild orang-utans to date, we employed...

Data from: High-throughput sequencing of ancient plant and mammal DNA preserved in herbivore middens

Dáithí C. Murray, Stuart G. Pearson, Richard Fullagar, Brian M. Chase, Jayne Houston, Jennifer Atchison, Nicole E. White, Matthew I. Bellgard, Edward Clarke, Mike Macphail, M. Thomas P. Gilbert, James Haile & Michael Bunce
The study of arid palaeoenvironments is often frustrated by the poor or non-existent preservation of plant and animal material, yet these environments are of considerable environmental importance. The analysis of pollen and macrofossils isolated from herbivore middens has been an invaluable source of information regarding past environments and the nature of ecological fluctuations within arid zones. The application of ancient DNA (aDNA) techniques to hot, arid zone middens remains unexplored. This paper attempts to retrieve...

Data from: Multiple introductions from multiple sources: invasion patterns for an important eucalyptus leaf pathogen

Matsepo Taole, Wubetu Bihon, Michael J. Wingfield, Brenda D. Wingfield & Treena I. Burgess
Many population studies on invasive plant pathogens are undertaken without knowing the center of origin of the pathogen. Most leaf pathogens of Eucalyptus originate in Australia and consequently with indigenous populations available, and it is possible to study the pathways of invasion. Teratosphaeria suttonii is a commonly occurring leaf pathogen of Eucalyptus species, naturally distributed in tropical and subtropical regions of eastern Australia where it is regarded as a minor pathogen infecting older leaves; however,...

Data from: Applying the multistate capture-recapture robust design to characterize metapopulation structure

Delphine Chabanne, Kenneth H. Pollock, Hugh Finn, Lars Bejder & Delphine B. H. Chabanne
1. Population structure must be considered when developing mark-recapture (MR) study designs as the sampling of individuals from multiple populations (or subpopulations) may increase heterogeneity in individual capture probability. Conversely, the use of an appropriate MR study design which accommodates heterogeneity associated with capture-occasion varying covariates due to animals moving between ‘states’ (i.e. geographic sites) can provide insight into how animals are distributed in a particular environment and the status and connectivity of subpopulations. 2....

Data from: Implications of survey effort on estimating demographic parameters of a long-lived marine top predator

John Symons, Kate R. Sprogis & Lars Bejder
Effective management of wildlife populations rely on knowledge of their abundance, survival and reproductive rates. Maintaining long-term studies capable of estimating demographic parameters for long-lived, slow reproducing species is challenging. Insights into effects of research intensity on the statistical power to estimate demographic parameters is limited. Here, we investigate implications of survey effort on estimating abundance, home range sizes and reproductive output of Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops aduncus), using a three-year sub-sample of a long-term,...

Data from: The importance of spinner dolphin (Stenella longirostris) resting habitat: implications for management

Julian A. Tyne, David W. Johnston, Robert Rankin, Neil R. Loneragan & Lars Bejder
Linking key ecological characteristics with animal behaviour is essential for identifying and protecting important habitats that support life functions. Spinner dolphins display a predictable diurnal behavioural pattern where they forage offshore at night and return to sheltered bays during daytime to rest. These bays, which are also subject to considerable use by humans, have long been recognized as key habitats for this species although the extent to which dolphins rely on specific characteristics of these...

Data from: Predictors of Phytophthora diversity and community composition in natural areas across diverse Australian ecoregions

Treena I. Burgess, Keith L. McDougall, Peter M. Scott, Giles E. Hardy, Jeff Garnas & Giles E. StJ. Hardy
Comprehensive understanding of the patterns and drivers of microbial diversity at a landscape scale is in its infancy, despite the recent ease by which soil communities can be characterized using massively parallel amplicon sequencing. Here we report on a comprehensive analysis of the drivers of diversity distribution and composition of the ecologically and economically important Phytophthora genus from 414 soil samples collected across Australia. We assessed 22 environmental and seven categorical variables as potential predictors...

Data from: Who’s for dinner? High-throughput sequencing reveals bat diet differentiation in a biodiversity hotspot where prey taxonomy is largely undescribed

Joanna M. Burgar, Daithi C. Murray, Michael D. Craig, James Haile, Jayne Houston, Vicki Stokes & Michael Bunce
Effective management and conservation of biodiversity requires understanding of predator–prey relationships to ensure the continued existence of both predator and prey populations. Gathering dietary data from predatory species, such as insectivorous bats, often presents logistical challenges, further exacerbated in biodiversity hot spots because prey items are highly speciose, yet their taxonomy is largely undescribed. We used high-throughput sequencing (HTS) and bioinformatic analyses to phylogenetically group DNA sequences into molecular operational taxonomic units (MOTUs) to examine...

Data from: High suckling rates and acoustic crypsis of humpback whale neonates maximise potential for mother–calf energy transfer

Simone K. A. Videsen, Lars Bejder, Mark Johnson & Peter T. Madsen
1. The migration of humpback whales to and from their breeding grounds results in a short, critical time period during which neonatal calves must acquire sufficient energy via suckling from their fasting mothers to survive the long return journey. 2. Understanding neonate suckling behaviour is critical for understanding the energetics and evolution of humpback whale migratory behaviour and for informing conservation efforts, but despite its importance, very little is known about the details, rate and...

Data from: Population density and size influence pollen dispersal pattern and mating system of the predominantly outcrossed Banksia nivea (Proteaceae) in a threatened ecological community

Rujiporn Thavornkanlapachai, Philip G. Ladd & Margaret Byrne
Gene flow is a critical component of plant mating systems and influences population fitness, yet pollen dispersal can be highly variable and influenced by natural and anthropogenic fragmentation. Gene flow through pollen dispersal was investigated in two populations of contrasting size and habitat context in Banksia nivea ssp. uliginosa, a rare species in the Busselton ironstone threatened ecological community with a naturally fragmented distribution. Paternity analysis was conducted with seven microsatellite loci to determine mating...

Data from: Temporally and spatially partitioned behaviours of spinner dolphins: implications for resilience to human disturbance

Julian A. Tyne, David W. Johnston, Fredrik Christiansen & Lars Bejder
Selective forces shape the evolution of wildlife behavioural strategies and influence the spatial and temporal partitioning of behavioural activities to maximize individual fitness. Globally, wildlife is increasingly exposed to human activities which may affect their behavioural activities. The ability of wildlife to compensate for the effects of human activities may have implications for their resilience to disturbance. Resilience theory suggests that behavioural systems which are constrained in their repertoires are less resilient to disturbance than...

Data from: Nonlinear scaling of foraging contacts with rodent population density

Benny Borremans, Jonas Reijniers, Nelika K. Hughes, Stephanie S. Godfrey, Sophie Gryseels, Rhodes H. Makundi & Herwig Leirs
Density-dependent shifts in population processes like territoriality, reproduction, dispersal, and parasite transmission are driven by changes in contacts between individuals. Despite this, surprisingly little is known about how contacts change with density, and thus the mechanisms driving density-dependent processes. A simple linear contact-density function is often assumed, but this is not based on a sound basis of empirical data. We addressed this question using a replicated, semi-natural experiment in which we measured contacts at feeding...

Data from: Depth dependent dive kinematics suggest cost-efficient foraging strategies by tiger sharks

Samantha Andrzejaczek, Adrian Gleiss, Karissa Lear, Charitha Pattiaratchi, Taylor Chapple & Mark Meekan
Tiger sharks Galeocerdo cuvier are a keystone, top-order predator that are assumed to engage in cost-efficient movement and foraging patterns. To investigate the extent to which patterns of oscillatory diving by these animals conform to these patterns, we used a biologging approach to model their cost of transport. High-resolution biologging tags with tri-axial sensors were deployed on 21 tiger sharks at Ningaloo Reef for durations of 5-48 hours. Using overall dynamic body acceleration (ODBA) as...

Data from: A critical evaluation of how ancient DNA bulk bone metabarcoding complements traditional morphological analysis of fossil assemblages

Alicia C. Grealy, Matthew C. McDowell, Paul Scofield, Dáithí C. Murray, Diana A. Fusco, James Haile, Gavin J. Prideaux & Michael Bunce
When pooled for extraction as a bulk sample, the DNA within morphologically unidentifiable fossil bones can, using next-generation sequencing, yield valuable taxonomic data. This method has been proposed as a means to rapidly and cost-effectively assess general ancient DNA preservation at a site, and to investigate temporal and spatial changes in biodiversity; however, several caveats have yet to be considered. We critically evaluated the bulk bone metabarcoding (BBM) method in terms of its: (i) repeatability,...

Data from: Deep sequencing of plant and animal DNA contained within traditional Chinese medicines reveals legality issues and health safety concerns

Megan L. Coghlan, James Haile, Jayne Houston, Dáithí C. Murray, Nicole E. White, Paula Moolhuijzen, Matthew I. Bellgard & Michael Bunce
Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has been practiced for thousands of years, but only within the last few decades has its use become more widespread outside of Asia. Concerns continue to be raised about the efficacy, legality and safety of many popular complementary alternative medicines, including TCMs. Ingredients of some TCMs are known to include derivatives of endangered, trade-restricted species of plant and animal and therefore contravene the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES)...

Sequence alignment for 7 gene regions for new Phytophthora species in clade 2a

Treena Burgess
Five new taxa from Phytophthora ITS Clade 2a are described from Cinnamomum cassia plantations and adjacent waterways in Van Yen, Vietnam, and disturbed rainforest in the Hela Province of Papua New Guinea and from disturbed forest on Christmas Island. Phylogenetic analyses were performed using data from nuclear regions (ITS, β-tubulin; Heat shock protein 90) and mitochondrial regions (cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1; cytochrome c oxidase subunit2; NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1; ribosomal protein L10). The molecular...

Data from: Genetic isolation between coastal and fishery-impacted, offshore bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops spp.) populations

Simon J. Allen, Kate A. Bryant, Robert H. S. Kraus, Neil R. Loneragan, Anna M. Kopps, Alexander M. Brown, Livia Gerber & Michael Krützen
The identification of species and population boundaries is important in both evolutionary and conservation biology. In recent years, new population genetic and computational methods for estimating population parameters and testing hypotheses in a quantitative manner have emerged. Using a Bayesian framework and a quantitative model-testing approach, we evaluated the species status and genetic connectedness of bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops spp.) populations off remote northwestern Australia, with a focus on pelagic 'offshore' dolphins subject to incidental capture...

Data from: Genetic diversity loss in a biodiversity hotspot: ancient DNA quantifies genetic decline and former connectivity in a critically endangered marsupial.

Carlo Pacioni, Helen Hunt, Morten E. Allentoft, Timothy G. Vaughan, Adrian F. Wayne, Alexander Baynes, Dalal Haouchar, Joe Dortch & Michael Bunce
The extent of genetic diversity loss and former connectivity between fragmented populations are often unknown factors when studying endangered species. While genetic techniques are commonly applied in extant populations to assess temporal and spatial demographic changes, it is no substitute for directly measuring past diversity using ancient DNA (aDNA). We analysed both mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and nuclear microsatellite loci from 64 historical fossil and skin samples of the critically endangered Western Australian woylie (Bettongia penicillata...

Data from: It’s not all black and white: investigating colour polymorphism in manta rays across Indo-Pacific populations

Stephanie Venables, Andrea Marshall, Elitza Germanov, Robert Perryman, Ricardo Tapilatu, I. Gede Hendrawan, Anna Flam, Mike Van Keulen, Joseph Tomkins & Jason Kennington
Intraspecific colour polymorphisms have been the focus of numerous studies, yet processes affecting melanism in the marine environment remain poorly understood. Arguably the most prominent example of melanism in marine species occurs in manta rays (Mobula birostris and M. alfredi). Here, we use photo identification catalogues to document the frequency variation of melanism across Indo-Pacific manta ray populations and test for evidence of selection by predation acting on colour morph variants. We use mark-recapture modeling...

Unburnt habitat patches are critical for survival and in situ population recovery in a small mammal after fire

Robyn E Shaw, Alex James, Katherine Tuft, Sarah Legge, Geoffrey J Cary, Rod Peakall & Sam C Banks
Fire drives animal population dynamics across many ecosystems. Yet, we still lack an understanding of how most species recover from fire and the effects of fire severity and patchiness on recovery processes. This information is crucial for fire-mediated biodiversity conservation, particularly as fire regimes change globally. We conducted an experiment to test whether post-fire recovery is driven by in situ survival or recolonisation, and to determine whether this varies with fires of increasing percentage area...

Data from: Survival, gene and metabolite responses of Litoria verreauxii alpina frogs to fungal disease chytridiomycosis

Laura Grogan, Jason Mulvenna, Joel P. A. Gummer, Benjamin C. Scheele, Lee Berger, Scott D. Cashins, Michael S. McFadden, Peter Harlow, David A. Hunter, Robert D. Trengove & Lee F. Skerratt
PLEASE NOTE, THESE DATA ARE ALSO REFERRED TO IN ANOTHER PUBLICATION. PLEASE SEE http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/mec.14493. The fungal skin disease chytridiomycosis has caused the devastating decline and extinction of hundreds of amphibian species globally, yet the potential for evolving resistance, and the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms remain poorly understood. We exposed 406 naïve, captive-raised alpine tree frogs (Litoria verreauxii alpina) from multiple populations (one evolutionarily naïve to chytridiomycosis) to the aetiological agent Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis in two concurrent and...

Data from: When the going gets tough: behavioral type dependent space use in the sleepy lizard changes as the season dries

Orr Spiegel, Stephan T. Leu, Andy Sih, Stephanie S. Godfrey, C. Michael Bull & Andrew Sih
Understanding space use remains a major challenge for animal ecology, with implications for species interactions, disease spread, and conservation. Behavioural type (BT) may shape the space use of individuals within animal populations. Bolder or more aggressive individuals tend to be more exploratory and disperse further. Yet, to date we have limited knowledge on how space use other than dispersal depends on BT. To address this question we studied BT-dependent space-use patterns of sleepy lizards (Tiliqua...

Data from: Genetic structure and signatures of selection in grey reef sharks (Carcharhinus amblyrhynchos)

Paolo Momigliano, Robert Harcourt, William D. Robbins, Vanessa Jaiteh, Gusti N. Mahardika, Andriuanus Sembiring & Adam Stow
With overfishing reducing the abundance of marine predators in multiple marine ecosystems, knowledge of genomic structure and local adaptation may provide valuable information to assist sustainable management. Despite recent technological advances, most studies on sharks have used small sets of neutral markers to describe their genetic structure. We used 5517 nuclear SNPs and a mtDNA gene to characterize patterns of genetic structure and detect signatures of selection in grey reef sharks (Carcharhinus amblyrhynchos). Using samples...

Data from: Cultural transmission of tool use combined with habitat specializations leads to fine-scale genetic structure in bottlenose dolphins

Anna M. Kopps, Corinne Y. Ackermann, William B. Sherwin, Simon J. Allen, Lars Bejder, Michael Krützen & M. Krutzen
Kopps et al 2014 genotypes

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