9 Works

Data from: Implications of survey effort on estimating demographic parameters of a long-lived marine top predator

John Symons, Kate R. Sprogis & Lars Bejder
Effective management of wildlife populations rely on knowledge of their abundance, survival and reproductive rates. Maintaining long-term studies capable of estimating demographic parameters for long-lived, slow reproducing species is challenging. Insights into effects of research intensity on the statistical power to estimate demographic parameters is limited. Here, we investigate implications of survey effort on estimating abundance, home range sizes and reproductive output of Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops aduncus), using a three-year sub-sample of a long-term,...

Data from: Population density and size influence pollen dispersal pattern and mating system of the predominantly outcrossed Banksia nivea (Proteaceae) in a threatened ecological community

Rujiporn Thavornkanlapachai, Philip G. Ladd & Margaret Byrne
Gene flow is a critical component of plant mating systems and influences population fitness, yet pollen dispersal can be highly variable and influenced by natural and anthropogenic fragmentation. Gene flow through pollen dispersal was investigated in two populations of contrasting size and habitat context in Banksia nivea ssp. uliginosa, a rare species in the Busselton ironstone threatened ecological community with a naturally fragmented distribution. Paternity analysis was conducted with seven microsatellite loci to determine mating...

Data from: Predictors of Phytophthora diversity and community composition in natural areas across diverse Australian ecoregions

Treena I. Burgess, Keith L. McDougall, Peter M. Scott, Giles E. Hardy, Jeff Garnas & Giles E. StJ. Hardy
Comprehensive understanding of the patterns and drivers of microbial diversity at a landscape scale is in its infancy, despite the recent ease by which soil communities can be characterized using massively parallel amplicon sequencing. Here we report on a comprehensive analysis of the drivers of diversity distribution and composition of the ecologically and economically important Phytophthora genus from 414 soil samples collected across Australia. We assessed 22 environmental and seven categorical variables as potential predictors...

Data from: Survival, gene and metabolite responses of Litoria verreauxii alpina frogs to fungal disease chytridiomycosis

Laura Grogan, Jason Mulvenna, Joel P. A. Gummer, Benjamin C. Scheele, Lee Berger, Scott D. Cashins, Michael S. McFadden, Peter Harlow, David A. Hunter, Robert D. Trengove & Lee F. Skerratt
PLEASE NOTE, THESE DATA ARE ALSO REFERRED TO IN ANOTHER PUBLICATION. PLEASE SEE http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/mec.14493. The fungal skin disease chytridiomycosis has caused the devastating decline and extinction of hundreds of amphibian species globally, yet the potential for evolving resistance, and the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms remain poorly understood. We exposed 406 naïve, captive-raised alpine tree frogs (Litoria verreauxii alpina) from multiple populations (one evolutionarily naïve to chytridiomycosis) to the aetiological agent Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis in two concurrent and...

Data from: The cover uncovered: bark control over wood decomposition

Gbadamassi G.O. Dossa, Douglas Schaefer, Jiao-Lin Zhang, Jian-Ping Tao, Kun-Fang Cao, Richard T. Corlett, Anthony B. Cunningham, Jian-Chu Xu, Johannes H. C. Cornelissen, Rhett D. Harrison & Gbadamassi G. O. Dossa
1. Woody debris (WD) represents a globally significant carbon stock and its decomposition returns nutrients to the soil while providing habitat to microbes, plants and animals. Understanding what drives WD decomposition is therefore important. 2. WD decomposition rates differ greatly among species. However, the role of bark in the process remains poorly known. 3. We ask how, and how much, interspecific variation in bark functional traits related to growth and protection have afterlife effects on...

Data from: Chronic exposure of Hawaii Island spinner dolphins (Stenella longirostris) to human activities

Julian A. Tyne, Fredrik Christiansen, Heather L. Heenehan, David W. Johnston & Lars Bejder
Habitat selection is strongly influenced by spatial variations in habitat quality and predation risk. Repeated exposure of wildlife to anthropogenic activities in important habitats may affect habitat selection, leading to negative biological consequences. We quantified the cumulative human exposure of a small, genetically-isolated and behaviourally-constrained spinner dolphin (Stenella longirostris) population, off Hawaii Island, and exposure effects on their daytime cumulative activity budget. Dolphins were exposed to human activities within 100m for 82.7% of the daytime,...

Data from: Effect of plant root symbionts on performance of native woody species in competition with an invasive grass in multispecies microcosms

Christina Birnbaum, Tim K. Morald, Mark Tibbett, Richard G. Bennett & Rachel J. Standish
The majority of terrestrial plants form mutualistic associations with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and rhizobia (i.e. nitrogen fixing bacteria). Understanding these associations has important implications for ecological theory and for restoration practice. Here we tested whether the presence of AMF and rhizobia influence the performance of native woody plants invaded by a non-native grass in experimental microcosms. We planted eight plant species (i.e. Acacia acuminata, A. microbotrya, Eucalyptus loxophleba subsp. loxophleba, E. astringens, Calothamnus quadrifidus,...

Data from: Synchronous diversification of Sulawesi's iconic artiodactyls driven by recent geological events

Laurent A. F. Frantz, Anna Rudzinski, Abang Mansyursyah Surya Nugraha, Allowen Evin, James Burton, Ardern Hulme-Beaman, Anna Linderholm, Ross Barnett, Rodrigo Vega, Evan K. Irving-Pease, James Haile, Richard Allen, Kristin Leus, Jill Shephard, Mia Hillyer, Sarah Gillemot, Jeroen Van Den Hurk, Sharron Ogle, Cristina Atofanei, Mark G. Thomas, Friederike Johansson, Abdul Haris Mustari, John Williams, Kusdiantoro Mohamad, Chandramaya Siska Damayanti … & Greger Larson
The high degree of endemism on Sulawesi has previously been suggested to have vicariant origins, dating back 40 Myr ago. Recent studies, however, suggest that much of Sulawesi’s fauna assembled over the last 15 Myr. Here, we test the hypothesis that more recent uplift of previously submerged portions of land on Sulawesi promoted diversification, and that much of its faunal assemblage is much younger than the island itself. To do so, we combined palaeogeographical reconstructions...

Data from: Seed moisture content as a primary trait regulating the lethal temperature thresholds of seeds.

Ryan Tangney, David J. Merritt, Joseph B. Fontaine & Ben P. Miller
1) Fire has shaped biological responses of plants and plant communities in fire-prone systems and is linked to myriad ecological processes but also frequently puts people and infrastructure at risk. Fuel or hazard-reduction burning is a common practice aimed at reducing the risk of high-severity fires, which ideally also incorporates consideration of biodiversity values. Within fire-prone systems, seed banks are often critical for plant species’ regeneration, and seeds are typically adapted to survive the passage...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    9

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    9

Affiliations

  • Murdoch University
    9
  • University of Western Australia
    2
  • QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute
    1
  • NSW Office of Environment & Heritage
    1
  • University of Adelaide
    1
  • VU University Amsterdam
    1
  • Royal Zoological Society of Antwerp
    1
  • University of Pretoria
    1
  • National Museums Scotland
    1
  • Duke University
    1