42 Works

Data from: Regional climate and local-scale biotic acceptance explain native-exotic diversity relationships in Australian annual plant communities

Isaac R. Towers, John M. Dwyer, John. M. Dwyer & Isaac. R. Towers
Native and exotic species richness is expected to be negatively related at small spatial scales where individuals interact, and positive at larger spatial scales as a greater variety of habitats are sampled. However, a range of native-exotic richness relationships (NERRs) have been reported, including positive at small scales and negative at larger scales. We present a hierarchical metacommunity framework to explain how contrasting NERRs may emerge across scales and study systems, and then apply this...

Data from: An Ishihara-style test of animal colour vision

Karen L. Cheney, Naomi.F. Green, Alexander P. Vibert, Misha Vorobyev, Justin Marshall, Daniel C. Osorio & John A. Endler
Colour vision mediates ecologically relevant tasks for many animals, such as mate choice, foraging and predator avoidance. However, our understanding of animal colour perception is largely derived from human psychophysics, even though animal visual systems differ from our own. Behavioural tests of non-human animals are required to understand how colour signals are perceived by them. Here we introduce a novel test of colour vision in animals inspired by the Ishihara colour charts, which are widely...

Data from: Warming impacts on early life stages increase the vulnerability and delay the population recovery of a long-lived habitat-forming macroalga

Pol Capdevila, Bernat Hereu, Roberto Salguero-Gómez, Graciel·La Rovira, Alba Medrano, Emma Cebrian, Joaquim Garrabou, Diego K. Kersting & Cristina Linares
1. Understanding the combined effects of global and local stressors is crucial for conservation and management, yet challenging due to the different scales at which these stressors operate. Here we examine the effects of one of the most pervasive threats to marine biodiversity, ocean warming, on the early life stages of the habitat-forming macroalga Cystoseira zosteroides, its long-term consequences for population resilience and its combined effect with physical stressors. 2. First, we performed a controlled...

Data from: Adaptation to reef habitats through selection on the coral animal and its associated microbiome

Madeleine J.H. Van Oppen, Pim Bongaerts, Pedro Frade, Lesa M. Peplow, Sarah E. Boyd, Hieu T. Nim, Line K. Bay & Madeleine J. H. Van Oppen
Spatially adjacent habitats on coral reefs can represent highly distinct environments, often harbouring different coral communities. Yet, certain coral species thrive across divergent environments. It is unknown whether the forces of selection are sufficiently strong to overcome the counteracting effects of the typically high gene flow over short distances, and for local adaptation to occur. We screened the coral genome (using restriction-site-associated sequencing [RAD-seq]), and characterized both the dinoflagellate photosymbiont and tissue-associated prokaryote microbiomes (using...

Data from: New small-bodied ornithopods (Dinosauria, Neornithischia) from the Early Cretaceous Wonthaggi Formation (Strzelecki Group) of the Australian-Antarctic rift system, with revision of Qantassaurus intrepidus Rich and Vickers-Rich, 1999

Matthew C. Herne, Jay P. Nair, Alistair R. Evans & Alan M. Tait
The Flat Rocks locality in the Wonthaggi Formation (Strzelecki Group) of the Gippsland Basin, southeastern Australia, hosts fossils of a late Barremian vertebrate fauna that inhabited the ancient rift between Australia and Antarctica. Known from its dentary, Qantassaurus intrepidus Rich and Vickers-Rich, 1999 has been the only dinosaur named from this locality. However, the plethora of vertebrate fossils collected from Flat Rocks suggests that further dinosaurs await discovery. From this locality, we name a new...

Data from: High species richness and lineage diversity of reef corals in the mesophotic zone

Paul R. Muir, Carden C. Wallace, Michel Pichon & Pim Bongaerts
Coral reefs are increasingly threatened by thermal bleaching and tropical storm events associated with rising sea surface temperatures. Deeper habitats offer some protection from these impacts and may safeguard reef-coral biodiversity, but their faunas are largely undescribed for the Indo-Pacific. Here, we show high species richness of scleractinian corals in mesophotic habitats (30-125 m) for the northern Great Barrier Reef region that greatly exceeds previous records for mesophotic habitats globally. Overall, 45% of shallow reef...

Data from: QuLinePlus: extending plant breeding strategy and genetic model simulation to cross-pollinated populations – case studies in forage breeding

Valerio Hoyos-Villegas, Vivi N. Arief, Wen-Hsi Yang, Mingzhu Sun, Ian H. DeLacy, Brent A. Barrett, Zulfi Jahufer & Kaye E. Basford
Plant breeders are supported by a range of tools that assist them to make decisions about the conduct or design of plant breeding programs. Simulations are a strategic tool that enable the breeder to integrate the multiple components of a breeding program into a number of proposed scenarios that are compared by a range of statistics measuring the efficiency of the proposed systems. A simulation study for the trait growth score compared two major strategies...

Data from: A genomic reference panel for Drosophila serrata

Adam R. Reddiex, Scott L. Allen & Stephen F. Chenoweth
Here we describe a collection of re-sequenced inbred lines of Drosophila serrata, sampled from a natural population situated deep within the species endemic distribution in Brisbane, Australia. D. serrata is a member of the speciose montium group whose members inhabit much of south east Asia and has been well studied for aspects of climatic adaptation, sexual selection, sexual dimorphism, and mate recognition. We sequenced 110 lines that were inbred via 17-20 generations of full-sib mating...

Data from: The ‘filtering’ metaphor revisited: competition and environment jointly structure invasibility and coexistence

Rachel M. Germain, Margaret M. Mayfield & Benjamin Gilbert
‘Filtering’, or the reduction in species diversity that occurs because not all species can persist in all locations, is thought to unfold hierarchically, controlled by the environment at large scales and competition at small scales. However, the ecological effects of competition and the environment are not independent, and observational approaches preclude investigation into their interplay. We use a demographic approach with 30 plant species to experimentally test (i) the effect of competition on species persistence...

Data from: Neuromechanical coupling within the human triceps surae and its consequence on individual force sharing strategies

Marion Crouzier, Lilian Lacourpaille, Antoine Nordez, Kylie Tucker & Francois Hug
Little is known about the factors that influence the coordination of synergist muscles that act across the same joint, even during single-joint isometric tasks. The overall aim of this study was to determine the nature of the relationship between the distribution of activation and the distribution of force-generating capacity among the three heads of the triceps surae (soleus [SOL], gastrocnemius medialis [GM] and lateralis [GL]). Twenty volunteers performed isometric plantarflexions during which the activation of...

Data from: Short-term response of a declining woodland bird assemblage to the removal of a despotic competitor

Galen Davitt, Kimberly Maute, Richard E. Major, Paul G. McDonald & Martine Maron
Interspecific aggression by the noisy miner (Manorina melanocephala), a highly despotic species, is homogenizing woodland avifaunas across eastern Australia. Although a native species, the noisy miner's aggressive exclusion of small birds is a Key Threatening Process under national law. Large‐scale removal of noisy miners has been proposed as a management response to this threat following increases in miner presence due to anthropogenic land use practices. We tested this proposal by experimentally removing noisy miners from...

Data from: Multiple habitat use by declining migratory birds necessitates joined-up conservation

Micha V Jackson, L R Carrasco, Chi-Yeung Choi, Jing Li, Zhijun Ma, David S Melville, Tong Mu, He-Bo Peng, Bradley K Woodworth, Ziyou Yang, Lin Zhang & Richard A Fuller
Many species depend on multiple habitats at different points in space and time. Their effective conservation requires an understanding of how and when each habitat is used, coupled with adequate protection. Migratory shorebirds use intertidal and supratidal wetlands, both of which are affected by coastal landscape change. Yet the extent to which shorebirds use artificial supratidal habitats, particularly at highly developed stopover sites, remains poorly understood leading to potential deficiencies in habitat management. We surveyed...

Data from: Global patterns in helminth host specificity: phylogenetic and functional diversity of regional host species pools matter

Konstans Wells, David I. Gibson & Nicholas J. Clark
Host specificity has a major influence on a parasite’s ability to shift between human and animal host species. Yet there is a dearth of quantitative approaches to explore variation in host specificity across biogeographical scales, particularly in response to the varying community compositions of potential hosts. We built a global dataset of intermediate host associations for nine of the world’s most widespread helminth parasites (all of which infect humans). Using hierarchical models, we asked if...

Data from: Avoided emissions and conservation of scrub mangroves: a potential Blue Carbon project in the Gulf of California, Mexico

M. Fernanda Adame, Eduardo Najera, Catherine E. Lovelock & Chris J. Brown
Mangroves are considered ideal ecosystems for Blue Carbon projects. However, because of their short stature, some mangroves (“scrub” mangroves, < 2m) do not fulfil the current definition of “forests” which makes them ineligible for emission reduction programs such as REDD+. Short stature mangroves can be the dominant form of mangroves in arid and poor nutrient landscapes, and emissions from their deforestation and degradation could be substantial. Here, we describe a potential Blue Carbon project in...

Data from: Prediction error and repetition suppression have distinct effects on neural representations of visual information

Matthew F. Tang, Cooper A. Smout, Ehsan Arabzadeh & Jason B. Mattingley
Predictive coding theories argue that recent experience establishes expectations in the brain that generate prediction errors when violated. Prediction errors provide a possible explanation for repetition suppression, where evoked neural activity is attenuated across repeated presentations of the same stimulus. The predictive coding account argues repetition suppression arises because repeated stimuli are expected, whereas non-repeated stimuli are unexpected and thus elicit larger neural responses. Here we employed electroencephalography in humans to test the predictive coding...

Data from: Geometric models to explore mechanisms of dynamic shape change in skeletal muscle

Taylor J.M. Dick, James M. Wakeling & Taylor J. M. Dick
Skeletal muscle bulges when it contracts. These 3-dimensional (3D) dynamic shape changes play an important role in muscle performance by altering the range of fascicle velocities over which a muscle operates. However traditional muscle models are 1D and cannot fully explain in vivo shape changes. In this study we compared medial gastrocnemius behaviour during human cycling (fascicle length changes and rotations) predicted by a traditional 1D Hill-type model and by models that incorporate 2D and...

Data from: Do slower movers have lower reproductive success and higher mutation load?

Carly B. Walsh & Katrina McGuigan
Deleterious mutations occur frequently in eukaryotes, resulting in individuals carrying multiple alleles that decrease their fitness. At a population level, if unchecked, accumulation of this mutation load can ultimately lead to extinction. How selection counters the accumulation of mutation load, limiting declines in population fitness, is not well understood. Here, we use manipulative experiments in zebrafish (Danio rerio) to investigate the opportunities for selection on mutation load. Inducing high mutation load through mutagenesis, we applied...

Data from: Seascapes as drivers of herbivore assemblages in coral reef ecosystems

George Roff, Sonia Bejarano, Mark Priest, Alyssa Marshell, Iliana Chollett, Robert S. Steneck, Christopher Doropoulos, Yimnang Golbuu & Peter J. Mumby
Herbivorous fish maintain a critical ecosystem function on coral reefs by grazing algae and maintaining highly productive algal turf assemblages. Current paradigms implicate habitat complexity, predation and primary productivity as major drivers of the distribution and abundance of herbivorous fish, yet little is known about the relative contribution of these factors. Here, we compare bottom-up and top-down drivers of notional herbivore assemblages across an environmental gradient of wave exposure in the Palau archipelago. We surveyed...

Data from: The influence of distance to perennial surface water on ant communities in Mopane woodlands, northern Botswana

Fredrik Dalerum, Tarryn Anne Retief, Carl Peter Havemann, Christian T. Chimimba, Benrdt Janse Van Rensburg & Berndt Janse Van Rensburg
Studies of biodiversity along environmental gradients provide information on how ecological communities change in response to biotic and abiotic factors. For instance, distance to water is associated with several factors that shape the structure and the functioning of ecosystems at a range of spatial scales. We investigated the influence of distance to a perennial water source on ant communities in a semi-arid savanna in northern Botswana. Ant abundance, taxonomic richness and both alpha and beta...

Data from: Accurate predictions of coexistence in natural systems require the inclusion of facilitative interactions and environmental dependency

Malyon D. Bimler, Daniel B. Stouffer, Hao Ran Lai & Margaret M. Mayfield
1. Coexistence between plant species is well known to depend on the outcomes of species interactions within an environmental context. The incorporation of environmental variation into empirical studies of coexistence are rare, however, due to the complex experiments needed to do so and the lack of feasible modelling approaches for determining how environmental factors alter specific coexistence mechanisms. 2. In this paper, we present a simple modelling framework for assessing how variation in species interactions...

Data from: Pattern edges improve predator learning of aposematic signals

Naomi F. Green, Holly H. Urquhart, Cedric P. Van Den Berg, N. Justin Marshall & Karen L. Cheney
Edges are salient visual cues created by abrupt changes in luminance and color, and are crucial in perceptual tasks such as motion detection and object recognition. Disruptively colored animals exploit edge detection mechanisms to obscure their body outline and/or to conceal themselves against their background. Conversely, aposematic species may use contrasting patterns with well-defined edges to create highly salient, memorable warning signals. In this study, we investigated how the amount of internal pattern edge, colored...

Data from: Multidimensional analyses of physical performance reveal a size dependent trade-off between suites of traits

Jordan E. Charters, Jaime Heiniger, Christofer J. Clemente, Skye F. Cameron, Ami F. Amir Abdul Nasir, Amanda C. Niehaus & Robbie S. Wilson
1. Animal movement is multidimensional and complex, and to understand the motor system of wild animals in the context of their natural ecology, we must analyze how suites of performance traits both mutualistically and antagonistically affect function —a necessity highlighted by previous work on performance trade-offs. 2. Evidence from some studies of human athletes using multidimensional analyses of performance suggests that overall quality among individuals can mask functional trade-offs within them, yet no studies have...

Data from: Groundwater enhances aboveground growth in mangroves

Matthew A. Hayes, Amber Jesse, Nina Welti, Basam Tabet, David Lockington & Catherine E. Lovelock
1. Groundwater flow through coastal wetlands plays an important role in the maintenance of productivity of intertidal ecosystems. Groundwater can reduce salinity and increase nutrient availability which can enhance plant growth and alter plant biomass allocation patterns. 2. Here, we used stable isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen to assess how groundwater influences belowground and aboveground growth in the widespread mangrove species Avicennia marina. 3. We found source water within tree stems varied seasonally, with non-saline...

Data from: Assessment of plasma proteomics biomarker’s ability to distinguish benign from malignant lung nodules

Gerard A. Silvestri, Nichole T. Tanner, Paul Kearney, Anil Vachani, Pierre P. Massion, Alexander Porter, Steven C. Springmeyer, Kenneth C. Fang, David Midthun, Peter J. Mazzone, D. Madtes, J. Landis, A. Levesque, K. Rothe, M. Balaan, B. Dimitt, B. Fortin, N. Ettinger, A. Pierre, L. Yarmus, K. Oakjones-Burgess, N. Desai, Z. Hammoud, A. Sorenson, R. Murali … & F. Allison
Background: Lung nodules are a diagnostic challenge, with an estimated yearly incidence of 1.6 million in the United States. This study evaluated the accuracy of an integrated proteomic classifier in identifying benign nodules in patients with a pretest probability of cancer (pCA) ≤ 50%. Methods: A prospective, multicenter observational trial of 685 patients with 8- to 30-mm lung nodules was conducted. Multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry was used to measure the relative abundance of two...

Data from: Cyclic population dynamics and density-dependent intransitivity as pathways to coexistence between co-occurring annual plants

Daniel B. Stouffer, Claire E. Wainwright, Thomas Flanagan & Margaret M. Mayfield
1. Recent studies have brought renewed attention to the importance of complex species interactions - notably intransitive interactions - to patterns of plant community diversity. One underappreciated avenue through which intransitivity can occur is through cyclic population dynamics. Though such cyclic intransitive relationships have been extensively studied in predator-prey systems, evidence of their importance in competitive communities, notably plant communities, is more limited. Most studies of coexistence in plant communities assume fixed-point coexistence even while...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    42

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    42

Affiliations

  • University of Queensland
    42
  • University of the Sunshine Coast
    3
  • University of Toronto
    3
  • Queensland University of Technology
    3
  • Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation
    3
  • University of Canterbury
    3
  • University of Washington
    2
  • Australian National University
    2
  • University of Melbourne
    2
  • National University of Singapore
    2