30 Works

Data from: Moving in the Anthropocene: global reductions in terrestrial mammalian movements

Marlee A. Tucker, Katrin Böhning-Gaese, William F. Fagan, John M. Fryxell, Bram Van Moorter, Susan C. Alberts, Abdullahi H. Ali, Andrew M. Allen, Nina Attias, Tal Avgar, Hattie Bartlam-Brooks, Buuveibaatar Bayarbaatar, Jerrold L. Belant, Alessandra Bertassoni, Dean Beyer, Laura Bidner, Floris M. Van Beest, Stephen Blake, Niels Blaum, Chloe Bracis, Danielle Brown, P. J. Nico De Bruyn, Francesca Cagnacci, Justin M. Calabrese, Constança Camilo-Alves … & Thomas Mueller
Animal movement is fundamental for ecosystem functioning and species survival, yet the effects of the anthropogenic footprint on animal movements have not been estimated across species. Using a unique GPS-tracking database of 803 individuals across 57 species, we found that movements of mammals in areas with a comparatively high human footprint were on average one-half to one-third the extent of their movements in areas with a low human footprint. We attribute this reduction to behavioral...

Data from: Transcriptome profiles of sunflower reveal the potential role of microsatellites in gene expression divergence

Chathurani Ranathunge, Gregory L. Wheeler, Melody E. Chimahusky, Meaghan M. Kennedy, Jesse I. Morrison, Brian S. Baldwin, Andy D. Perkins & Mark E. Welch
The mechanisms by which natural populations generate adaptive genetic variation are not well understood. Some studies propose that microsatellites can function as drivers of adaptive variation. Here we tested a potentially adaptive role for transcribed microsatellites with natural populations of the common sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) by assessing the enrichment of microsatellites in genes that show expression divergence across latitudes. Seeds collected from six populations at two distinct latitudes in Kansas and Oklahoma were planted...

Data from: Using phylogenomic data to explore the effects of relaxed clocks and calibration strategies on divergence time estimation: primates as a test case

Mario Dos Reis, Gregg F. Gunnell, Jose Barba-Montoya, Alex Wilkins, Ziheng Yang & Anne D. Yoder
Primates have long been a test case for the development of phylogenetic methods for divergence time estimation. Despite a large number of studies, however, the timing of origination of crown Primates relative to the K-Pg boundary and the timing of diversification of the main crown groups remain controversial. Here we analysed a dataset of 372 taxa (367 Primates and 5 outgroups, 3.4 million aligned base pairs) that includes nine primate genomes. We systematically explore the...

Data from: Evidence that Myotis lucifugus ‘subspecies’ are five non-sister species, despite gene flow

Ariadna E Morales & Bryan C Carstens
While genetic exchange between non-sister species was traditionally considered to be rare in mammals, analyses of molecular data in multiple systems suggest that it may be common. Interspecific gene flow, if present, is problematic for phylogenetic inference, particularly for analyses near the species level. Here, we explore how to detect and account for gene flow during phylogeny estimation using data from a clade of North American Myotis bats where previous results have led researchers to...

Data from: Geographic range size and latitude predict population genetic structure in a global survey

Tara A. Pelletier & Bryan C. Carstens
While genetic diversity within species is influenced by both geographic distance and environmental gradients, it is unclear what other factors are likely to promote population genetic structure. Using a machine learning framework and georeferenced DNA sequences from >8,000 species, we demonstrate that geographic attributes of the species range, including total size, latitude, and elevation are the most important predictors of which species are likely to contain structured genetic variation. While latitude is well known as...

Data from: Crop pests and predators exhibit inconsistent responses to surrounding landscape composition

Daniel S. Karp, Rebecca Chaplin-Kramer, Timothy D. Meehan, Emily A. Martin, Fabrice DeClerck, Heather Grab, Claudio Gratton, Lauren Hunt, Ashley E. Larsen, Alejandra Martínez-Salinas, Megan E. O’Rourke, Adrien Rusch, Katja Poveda, Mattias Jonsson, Jay A. Rosenheim, Nancy A. Schellhorn, Teja Tscharntke, Stephen D. Wratten, Wei Zhang, Aaron L. Iverson, Lynn S. Adler, Matthias Albrecht, Audrey Alignier, Gina M. Angelella, Muhammad Zubair Anjum … & Yi Zou
The idea that noncrop habitat enhances pest control and represents a win–win opportunity to conserve biodiversity and bolster yields has emerged as an agroecological paradigm. However, while noncrop habitat in landscapes surrounding farms sometimes benefits pest predators, natural enemy responses remain heterogeneous across studies and effects on pests are inconclusive. The observed heterogeneity in species responses to noncrop habitat may be biological in origin or could result from variation in how habitat and biocontrol are...

Data from: The evolutionary history of dogs in the Americas

Máire Ní Leathlobhair, Angela R. Perri, Evan K. Irving-Pease, Kelsey E. Witt, Anna Linderholm, James Haile, Ophelie Lebrasseur, Carly Ameen, Jeffrey Blick, Adam R. Boyko, Selina Brace, Yahaira Nunes Cortes, Susan J. Crockford, Alison Devault, Evangelos A. Dimopoulos, Morley Eldridge, Jacob Enk, Shyam Gopalakrishnan, Kevin Gori, Vaughan Grimes, Eric Guiry, Anders J. Hansen, Ardern Hulme-Beaman, John Johnson, Andrew Kitchen … & Laurent A. F. Frantz
Dogs were present in the Americas prior to the arrival of European colonists, but the origin and fate of these pre-contact dogs are largely unknown. We sequenced 71 mitochondrial and seven nuclear genomes from ancient North American and Siberian dogs spanning ~9,000 years. Our analysis indicates that American dogs were not domesticated from North American wolves. Instead, American dogs form a monophyletic lineage that likely originated in Siberia and dispersed into the Americas alongside people....

Data from: Genome-specific histories of divergence and introgression between an allopolyploid unisexual salamander lineage and two ancestral sexual species

Robert D. Denton, Ariadna E. Morales & H. Lisle Gibbs
Quantifying introgression between sexual species and polyploid lineages traditionally thought to be asexual is an important step in understanding what drives the longevity of putatively asexual groups. Here, we capitalize on three recent innovations—ultraconserved element (UCE) sequencing, bioinformatic techniques for identifying genome-specific variation in polyploids, and model-based methods for evaluating historical gene flow—to measure the extent and tempo of introgression over the evolutionary history of an allopolyploid lineage of all-female salamanders and two ancestral sexual...

Data from: Optimizing prevention of HIV mother to child transmission: duration of antiretroviral therapy and viral suppression at delivery among pregnant Malawian women

Maganizo B. Chagomerana, William C. Miller, Jennifer H. Tang, Irving F. Hoffman, Bryan C. Mthiko, Jacob Phulusa, Mathias John, Allan Jumbe & Mina C. Hosseinipour
Background: Effective antiretroviral therapy during pregnancy minimizes the risk of vertical HIV transmission. Some women present late in their pregnancy for first antenatal visit; whether these women achieve viral suppression by delivery and how suppression varies with time on ART is unclear. Methods: We conducted a prospective cohort study of HIV-infected pregnant women initiating antiretroviral therapy for the first time from June 2015 to November 2016. Multivariable Poisson models with robust variance estimators were used...

Data from: Walking crowds on a shaky surface: stable walkers discover Millennium Bridge oscillations with and without pedestrian synchrony

Varun Joshi & Manoj Srinivasan
Why did the London Millennium Bridge shake when there was a big enough crowd walking on it? What features of human walking dynamics when coupled to a shaky surface produce such shaking? Here, we use a simple biped model capable of walking stably in 3D to examine these questions. We simulate multiple such stable bipeds walking simultaneously on a bridge, showing that they naturally synchronize under certain conditions, but that synchronization is not required to...

Data from: Artificial lighting at night alters aquatic-riparian invertebrate food webs

S. Mažeika P. Sullivan, Katie Hossler & Lars A. Meyer
Artificial lighting at night (ALAN) is a global phenomenon that can be detrimental to organisms at individual and population levels, yet potential consequences for communities and ecosystem functions are less resolved. Riparian systems may be particularly vulnerable to ALAN. We investigated the impacts of ALAN on invertebrate community composition and food-web characteristics for linked aquatic-terrestrial ecosystems. We focused on food-chain length (FCL) - a central property of ecological communities that can influence their structure, function...

Data from: Dominant and subordinate outside options alter help and eviction in a pay-to-stay negotiation model

Jennifer K. Hellmann & Ian M. Hamilton
In several cooperatively breeding species, subordinates that do not help sufficiently are punished or evicted from the group by dominant individuals. The credibility of dominant eviction threats may vary with the social context beyond the group level: when subordinates can easily breed in a neighboring territory, dominant may be less able to demand help from subordinates. Further, dominant ability to enforce subordinate cooperation may be reduced when it is difficult to replace evicted subordinates or...

Data from: HyDe: a Python package for genome-scale hybridization detection

Paul D. Blischak, Julia Chifman, Andrea D. Wolfe & Laura S. Kubatko
The analysis of hybridization and gene flow among closely related taxa is a common goal for researchers studying speciation and phylogeography. Many methods for hybridization detection use simple site pattern frequencies from observed genomic data and compare them to null models that predict an absence of gene flow. The theory underlying the detection of hybridization using these site pattern probabilities exploits the relationship between the coalescent process for gene trees within population trees and the...

Data from: Total duplication of the small single copy region in the angiosperm plastome: rearrangement and inverted repeat instability in Asarum

Brandon Tyler Sinn, Dylan D. Sedmak, Lawrence M. Kelly & John V. Freudenstein
Premise of the Study: As more plastomes are assembled, it is evident that rearrangements, losses, intergenic spacer expansion and contraction, and syntenic breaks within otherwise functioning plastids are more common than was thought previously, and such changes have developed independently in disparate lineages. However, to date, the magnoliids remain characterized by their highly conserved plastid genomes (plastomes). Methods: Illumina HiSeq and MiSeq platforms were used to sequence the plastomes of Saruma henryi and those of...

Data from: Habitat structure modifies microclimate: an approach for mapping fine-scale thermal refuge

Charlotte R. Milling, Janet L. Rachlow, Peter J. Olsoy, Mark A. Chappell, Timothy R. Johnson, Jennifer S. Forbey, Lisa A. Shipley & Daniel H. Thornton
1. Contemporary techniques predicting habitat suitability under climate change projections often underestimate availability of thermal refuges. Habitat structure contributes to thermal heterogeneity at a variety of spatial scales, but quantifying microclimates at organism‐relevant resolutions remains a challenge. Landscapes that appear homogeneous at large scales may offer patchily distributed thermal refuges at finer scales. 2. We quantified the relationship between vegetation structure and the thermal environment at a scale relevant to small, terrestrial animals using a...

Data from: Mutations in bacterial genes induce unanticipated changes in the relationship between bacterial pathogens in experimental otitis media

Vinal Lakhani, Tan Li, Sayak Mukherjee, William C.L. Stewart, W. Edward Sword & Jayajit Das
Otitis media (OM) is a common polymicrobial infection of the middle ear in children under the age of fifteen years. A widely used experimental strategy to analyze roles of specific phenotypes of bacterial pathogens of OM is to study changes in co-infection kinetics of bacterial populations in animal models when a wild type bacterial strain is replaced by a specific isogenic mutant strain in the co-inoculating mixtures. Since relationships between the OM bacterial pathogens within...

Data from: An ecological approach to measuring the evolutionary consequences of gene flow from crops to wild or weedy relatives

Lesley G. Campbell, David Lee, Kruti Shukla, Thomas A. Waite, Detlef Bartsch & Norman C. Ellstrand
Premise of the study: Agricultural practices routinely create opportunities for crops to hybridize with wild relatives, leading to crop gene introgression into wild genomes. Conservationists typically worry this introgression could lead to genetic homogenization of wild populations, over and above the central concern of transgene escape. Alternatively, viewing introgression as analogous to species invasion, we suggest that increased genetic diversity may likewise be an undesirable outcome. Methods: Here, we compare the sensitivity of conventional population...

Data from: Local prey community composition and genetic distance predict venom divergence among populations of the northern Pacific rattlesnake (Crotalus oreganus)

Matthew L. Holding, Mark J. Margres, Darin R. Rokyta, H. Lisa Gibbs & H. Lisle Gibbs
Identifying the environmental correlates of divergence in functional traits between populations can provide insights into the evolutionary mechanisms that generate local adaptation. Here, we assess patterns of population differentiation in expressed venom proteins in Northern Pacific rattlesnakes (Crotalus oreganus) from 13 locations across California. We evaluate the relative importance of major biotic (prey species community composition), abiotic (temperature, precipitation, and elevation) and genetic factors (genetic distance based on RADseq loci) as correlates of population divergence...

Data from: How does human motor cortex regulate vocal pitch in singers?

Michel Belyk, Yune S. Lee & Steven Brown
Vocal pitch is used as an important communicative device by humans, as found in the melodic dimension of both speech and song. Vocal pitch is determined by the degree of tension in the vocal folds of the larynx, which itself is influenced by complex and non-linear interactions among the laryngeal muscles. The relationship between these muscles and vocal pitch has been described by a mathematical model in the form of a set of “control rules”....

Data from: Too constrained to converse: the effect of financial constraints on word-of-mouth

Anna Paley, Stephanie M. Tully & Eesha Sharma
Existing research demonstrates that financial constraints are widespread and influence consumer attention, preference, choice, and consumption in a variety of ways. Despite the growing knowledge of how financial constraints affect the consumer decision making process, less is known about its impact on post-purchase behavior. This work examines whether financial constraints impact an important post-purchase behavior—word-of-mouth—and in what direction. Seven studies show that financial constraints reduce purchase-related word-of-mouth. This effect emerges across consumers’ reported frequencies of...

Data from: Genomewide genotyping of a novel Mexican Chile Pepper collection illuminates the history of landrace differentiation after Capsicum annuum L. domestication

Nathan Taitano, Vivian Bernau, Lev Jardón-Barbolla, Brian Leckie, Michael Mazourek, Kristin Mercer, Leah McHale, Andrew Michel, David Baumler, Michael Kantar, Esther Van Der Knapp & Esther Van Der Knaap
Studies of genetic diversity among phenotypically distinct crop landraces improve our understanding of fruit evolution and genome structure under domestication. Chile peppers (Capsicum spp. L.) are economically valuable and culturally important species, and extensive phenotypic variation among landraces exists in southern Mexico, a center of C. annuum diversity. We collected 103 chile pepper seed accessions from 22 named landraces across 27 locations in southern Mexico. We genotyped these accessions with genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS), yielding 32,623 filtered...

Data from: Risk factors for suicidality in Huntington's disease: an analysis of the 2CARE clinical trial

Andrew J. McGarry, Michael P. McDermott, Karl Kieburtz, Wai Lun Alan Fung, Elizabeth Anne McCusker, Jing Peng, Elisabeth A. De Blieck & Merit E. Cudkowicz
Most suicidality literature in HD is based on natural history studies or retrospective reviews, but reports on risk factors from clinical trials are limited. We analyzed 609 participants from 2CARE, a randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled clinical trial with up to 5 years of follow-up, for risk factors related to suicidality. The primary outcome variable was the time from randomization until the first occurrence of either suicidal ideation or attempt. We also considered time from randomization...

Data from: Using host-associated differentiation to track source population and dispersal distance among insect vectors of plant pathogens

Gina M. Angelella, Andy P. Michel, Ian Kaplan, G.M. Angelella & A.P. Michel
Small, mobile insects are notoriously challenging to track across landscapes and manage in agricultural fields. However, genetic differentiation among insect populations and host-plants acquired through host-associated differentiation could be exploited to infer movement within crop systems and damage potential. Although many insects exhibit host-associated differentiation, management strategies for insect vectors of plant pathogens assume a homogenous population. Nevertheless, phenotypic changes derived from host-associated differentiation could manifest in altered behavior or physiology affecting the likelihood of...

Data from: Dating the species network: allopolyploidy and repetitive DNA evolution in American daisies (Melampodium sect. Melampodium, Asteraceae)

Jamie McCann, Tae-Soo Jang, Jiri Macas, Gerald M. Schneeweiss, Nicholas J. Matzke, Petr Novak, Tod F. Stuessy, Jose L. Villaseñor & Hanna Weiss-Schneeweiss
Allopolyploidy has played an important role in the evolution of the flowering plants. Genome mergers are often accompanied by significant and rapid alterations of genome size and structure via chromosomal rearrangements and altered dynamics of tandem and dispersed repetitive DNA families. Recent developments in sequencing technologies and bioinformatic methods allow for a comprehensive investigation of the repetitive component of plant genomes. Interpretation of evolutionary dynamics following allopolyploidization requires both the knowledge of parentage and the...

Data from: Fluidigm2PURC: automated processing and haplotype inference for double-barcoded PCR amplicons

Paul D. Blischak, Maribeth Latvis, Diego F. Morales-Briones, Jens C. Johnson, Verónica S. Di Stilio, Andrea D. Wolfe & David C. Tank
Premise of the Study: Targeted enrichment strategies for phylogenomic inference are a time‐ and cost‐efficient way to collect DNA sequence data for large numbers of individuals at multiple, independent loci. Automated and reproducible processing of these data is a crucial step for researchers conducting phylogenetic studies. Methods and Results: We present Fluidigm2PURC, an open source Python utility for processing paired‐end Illumina data from double‐barcoded PCR amplicons. In combination with the program PURC (Pipeline for Untangling...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    30

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    30

Affiliations

  • The Ohio State University
    30
  • Max Planck Institute for Ornithology
    2
  • Duke University
    2
  • Université Paul-Valéry Montpellier
    2
  • University of Georgia
    2
  • University of Alberta
    2
  • University of Minnesota
    2
  • North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences
    2
  • University College London
    2
  • University of British Columbia
    2