43 Works

Personality predicts foraging site fidelity and trip repeatability in a marine predator

Stephanie M. Harris, Sébastien Descamps, Lynne U. Sneddon, Philip Bertrand, Olivier Chastel & Samantha C. Patrick
1. Animal populations are often comprised of both foraging specialists and generalists. For instance, some individuals show higher foraging site fidelity (spatial specialisation) than others. Such individual differences in degree of specialisation can persist over timescales of months or even years in long-lived animals, but the mechanisms leading to these different individual strategies are not fully understood. 2. There is accumulating evidence that individual variation in foraging behaviour is shaped by animal personality traits, such...

Data from: Oceanic thermal structure mediates dive sequences in a foraging seabird

Xavier Meyer, Andrew MacIntosh, André Chiaradia, Akiko Kato, Francisco Ramírez, Cedric Sueur & Yan Ropert-Coudert
1. Changes in marine ecosystems are easier to detect in upper-level predators, like seabirds, which integrate trophic interactions throughout the food web. 2. Here, we examined whether diving parameters and complexity in the temporal organisation of foraging sequences of little penguins (Eudyptula minor) are influenced by sea surface temperature (SST), water stratification and wind speed – three oceanographic features influencing prey abundance and distribution in the water column. 3. Using fractal time series analysis, we...

Westland petrel data combined GPS and accelerometer data 2016 & 2017

Timothee Poupart, Susan Waugh, Akiko Kato & John Arnould
This study investigated the foraging niche of dimorphic males and females Westland petrel during the chick-rearing period. At-sea movements were recorded with GPS, behaviours and foraging behaviour were recorded with accelerometers, and trophic niche was inferred with stable isotopes (carbon, nitrogen). Altogether, these fine-scale data allowed to look at the foraging niche used by males and females.

Variation in immunity and health in response to introduced avian malaria in an endemic Hawaiian songbird

Gabrielle Names, Elizabeth Schultz, Thomas Hahn, Kathleen Hunt, Frederic Angelier, Cécile Ribout & Kirk Klasing
Emerging infectious diseases are spreading at unprecedented rates and affecting wildlife worldwide, with particularly strong effects on islands. Since the introduction of avian malaria to Hawaii a century ago, the disease has contributed to the decline and extinction of several endemic Hawaiian honeycreeper species. At low elevation, where avian malaria is prevalent, Hawaii Amakihi (Chlorodrepanis virens) honeycreeper populations have experienced strong selection by the disease and have evolved increased malaria resilience, the ability to recover...

Fine-scale spatial segregation in a pelagic seabird driven by differential use of tidewater glacier fronts

Philip Bertrand, Joël Bêty, Nigel Gilles Yoccoz, Marie-Josée Fortin, Hallvard Strøm, Harald Steen, Jack Kohler, Stephanie M. Harris, Samantha C. Patrick, Olivier Chastel, Pierre Blévin, Haakon Hop, Geir Moholdt, Joséphine Maton & Sébastien Descamps
In colonially breeding marine predators, individual movements and colonial segregation are influenced by seascape characteristics. Tidewater glacier fronts are important features of the Arctic seascape and are often described as foraging hotspots. Albeit their documented importance for wildlife, little is known about their structuring effect on arctic predator movements and space use. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that tidewater glacier fronts can influence marine bird foraging patterns and drive spatial segregation among adjacent...

Supplementary information for Paleoceanographic changes in the late Pliocene promoted rapid diversification in pelagic seabirds

Joan Ferrer Obiol, Helen F. James, R. Terry Chesser, Vincent Bretagnolle, Jacob González-Solís, Julio Rozas, Andreanna J. Welch & Marta Riutort
Aim: Paleoceanographic changes can act as drivers of diversification and speciation, even in highly mobile marine organisms. Shearwaters are a group of globally distributed and highly mobile pelagic seabirds. Despite a recent well resolved phylogeny, shearwaters have controversial species limits, and show periods of both slow and rapid diversification. Here, we explore the role of paleoceanographic changes on the diversification and speciation in these highly mobile pelagic seabirds. We investigate shearwater biogeography and the evolution...

Data for: Modeling short-term energetic costs of sonar disturbance to cetaceans using high resolution foraging data

Max Czapanskiy, Matthew Savoca, William Gough, Paolo Segre, Danuta Wisniewska, David Cade & Jeremy Goldbogen
Anthropogenic noise is a pervasive and increasing source of disturbance to wildlife. Marine mammals exhibit behavioral and physiological responses to naval sonar and other sound sources. The lost foraging opportunities and elevated locomotor effort associated with sonar disturbance likely carry energetic costs, which may lead to population-level consequences. We modeled the energetic costs associated with behavioral responses using (1) empirical datasets of cetacean feeding rates and prey characteristics and (2) allometry of swimming performance and...

Data from: Postglacial recolonisation in a cold climate specialist in Western Europe: patterns of genetic diversity in the adder (Vipera berus) support the central-marginal hypothesis

Sylvain Ursenbacher, Michaël Guillon, Hervé Cubizolle, Andréaz Dupoué, Gabriel Blouin-Demers & Olivier Lourdais
Understanding the impact of postglacial recolonization on genetic diversity is essential in explaining current patterns of genetic variation. The central–marginal hypothesis (CMH) predicts a reduction in genetic diversity from the core of the distribution to peripheral populations, as well as reduced connectivity between peripheral populations. While the CMH has received considerable empirical support, its broad applicability is still debated and alternative hypotheses predict different spatial patterns of genetic diversity. Using microsatellite markers, we analysed the...

First explorations: ontogeny of central-place-foraging directions in two tropical seabirds

Julien Collet, Aurélien Prudor, Alexandre Corbeau, Loriane Mendez & Henri Weimerskirch
A widespread hypothesis for the ontogeny of behaviour and decision-making is the early-exploration-later-canalization hypothesis. It postulates that juveniles are more exploratory and adults more consistent in their behavior. In addition, it is often assumed that naïve juveniles could overcome the costs of individual experience building by copying more the decisions of others than adults (early-conformism-later-self-defining hypothesis). Here we compare the central-place-foraging movements of adults and post-fledging juveniles in their first flights around the colony before...

Temporal and spatial differences in the post-breeding behaviour of a ubiquitous Southern Hemisphere seabird, the common diving petrel

Aymeric Fromant, Charles-Andre Bost, Paco Bustamante, Alice Carravieri, Yves Cherel, Yonina Eizenberg, Colin Miskelly, John Arnould & Karine Delord
The non-breeding period plays a major role in seabird survival and population dynamics. However, our understanding of the migratory behaviour, moulting and feeding strategies of non-breeding seabirds is still very limited, especially for small-sized species. The present study investigated the post-breeding behaviour of three distant populations (Kerguelen Archipelago, south-eastern Australia, New Zealand) of the common diving petrel (Pelecanoides urinatrix), an abundant, widely distributed zooplanktivorous seabird breeding throughout the southern Atlantic, Indian and Pacific oceans. The...

Data from: Early-life exposure to artificial light at night elevates physiological stress in free-living songbirds

Melissa L. Grunst, Thomas Raap, Andrea S. Grunst, Rianne Pinxten, Charline Parenteau, Frédéric Angelier & Marcel Eens
Artificial light at night (ALAN) can disrupt adaptive patterns of physiology and behavior that promote high fitness, resulting in physiological stress and elevation of steroid glucocorticoids (corticosterone, CORT in birds). Elevated CORT may have particularly profound effects early in life, with the potential for enduring effects that persist into adulthood. Research on the consequences of early-life exposure to ALAN remains limited, especially outside of the laboratory, and whether light exposure affects CORT concentrations in wild...

Correlates of substitution rate variation in a robust Procellariiform seabird phylogeny

Andrea Estandia, Terry Chesser, Helen James, Max Levy, Joan Ferrer-Obiol, Vincent Bretagnolle, Jacob González-Solís & Andreanna Welch
Molecular substitution rates vary among branches and can lead to inaccurate reconstructions of evolutionary relationships and obscure the true phylogeny of affected clades. Body mass is often assumed to have a major influence on substitution rate, though other factors such as population size, life history traits, and flight demands are also thought to have an influence. Birds of the order Procellariiformes—which encompasses petrels, storm-petrels and albatrosses—show a striking 900-fold difference in body mass between the...

Landfast ice: a major driver of reproductive success in a polar seabird

Sara Labrousse, Alexander D. Fraser, Michael Sumner, Frédéric Le Manach, Christophe Sauser, Isabella Horstmann, Eileen Devane, Karine Delord, Stéphanie Jenouvrier & Christophe Barbraud
In a fast-changing world, polar ecosystems are threatened by climate variability. Understanding the roles of fine-scale processes, and linear and nonlinear effects of climate factors on the demography of polar species is crucial for anticipating the future state of these fragile ecosystems. While the effects of sea ice on polar marine top predators are increasingly being studied, little is known about the impacts of landfast ice (LFI) on this species community. Based on a unique...

Fisheries bycatch mitigation measures as an efficient tool for the conservation of seabird populations

Anaïs Dasnon, Karine Delord, Adrien Chaigne & Christophe Barbraud
The impact of industrial fisheries on marine biodiversity is conspicuous in large pelagic vertebrate fisheries bycatch. In seabirds, this led to the decline of many populations since the 1980s following the rise of global fishing efforts. Bycatch mitigation measures were implemented in the 2000s, but their effects on the concerned seabird populations remain poorly quantified and understood. We studied the effects of bycatch mitigation measures on the demography of the white-chinned petrel, one of the...

Data from: Spatial heterogeneity in landscape structure influences dispersal and genetic structure: empirical evidence from a grasshopper in an agricultural landscape

Bertrand Gauffre, Sophie Mallez, Marie-Pierre Chapuis, Leblois Raphael, Isabelle Litrico, Sabrina Delaunay, Isabelle Badenhausser & Raphael Leblois
Dispersal may be strongly influenced by landscape and habitat characteristics that could either enhance or restrict movements of organisms. Therefore, spatial heterogeneity in landscape structure could influence gene flow and the spatial structure of populations. In the past decades, agricultural intensification has led to the reduction in grassland surfaces, their fragmentation and intensification. As these changes are not homogeneously distributed in landscapes, they have resulted in spatial heterogeneity with generally less intensified hedged farmland areas...

Data from: Predictive modelling of habitat selection by marine predators with respect to the abundance and depth distribution of pelagic prey

Charlotte Boyd, Ramiro Castillo, , André E. Punt, Glenn R. VanBlaricom, Henri Weimerskirch, Sophie Bertrand & George L. Hunt
1. Understanding the ecological processes that underpin species distribution patterns is a fundamental goal in spatial ecology. However, developing predictive models of habitat use is challenging for species that forage in marine environments, as both predators and prey are often highly mobile and difficult to monitor. Consequently, few studies have developed resource selection functions for marine predators based directly on the abundance and distribution of their prey. 2. We analysed contemporaneous data on the diving...

Data from: Modelling unbiased dispersal kernels over continuous space by accounting for spatial heterogeneity in marking and observation efforts

Joël Chadoeuf, Alexandre Millon, Jean-Luc Bourrioux, Thierry Printemps, Benoit Van Hecke, Vincent Lecoustre & Vincent Bretagnolle
1. Although a key demographic trait determining the spatial dynamics of wild populations, dispersal is notoriously difficult to estimate in the field. Indeed, dispersal distances obtained from the monitoring of marked individuals typically lead to biased estimations of dispersal kernels as a consequence of i) restricted spatial scale of the study areas compared to species potential dispersal and ii) heterogeneity in marking and observation efforts and therfore in detection probability across space. 2. Here we...

Data from: Habitat-driven population structure of bottlenose dolphins, Tursiops truncatus, in the North-East Atlantic

Marie Louis, Amélia Viricel, Tamara Lucas, Hélène Peltier, Eric Alfonsi, Simon Berrow, Andrew Brownlow, Pablo Covelo, Willy Dabin, Rob Deaville, Renaud De Stephanis, François Gally, Pauline Gauffier, Rod Penrose, Monica A. Silva, Christophe Guinet & Benoît Simon-Bouhet
Despite no obvious barrier to gene flow, historical environmental processes and ecological specializations can lead to genetic differentiation in highly mobile animals. Ecotypes emerged in several large mammal species as a result of niche specializations and/or social organization. In the North-West Atlantic, two distinct bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) ecotypes (i.e. ‘coastal’ and ‘pelagic’) have been identified. Here, we investigated the genetic population structure of North-East Atlantic (NEA) bottlenose dolphins on a large scale through the...

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