42 Works

Data from: The edaphic environment mediates flowering-time differentiation between adjacent populations of Leptosiphon parviflorus

Emily L. Dittmar & Douglas W. Schemske
Flowering time is an important life history trait in plants that often affects fitness. The optimal time to flower may be influenced by trade-offs between flowering time and growth-related traits and is thus likely to differ among habitats. Because flowering-time differences between populations can also reduce gene flow, understanding the factors that contribute to variation in flowering time among closely adjacent populations that experience gene flow is of particular interest. Plant adaptation to different edaphic...

The Rhododendron genome and chromosomal organization provide insight into shared whole-genome duplications across the heath family (Ericaceae)

Valerie L. Soza, Dale Lindsley, Adam Waalkes, Elizabeth Ramage, Rupali P. Patwardhan, Joshua N. Burton, Andrew Adey, Akash Kumar, Ruolan Qiu, Jay Shendure & Benjamin Hall
The genus Rhododendron (Ericaceae), which includes horticulturally important plants such as azaleas, is a highly diverse and widely distributed genus of >1,000 species. Here, we report the chromosome-scale de novo assembly and genome annotation of Rhododendron williamsianum as a basis for continued study of this large genus. We created multiple short fragment genomic libraries, which were assembled using ALLPATHS-LG. This was followed by contiguity preserving transposase sequencing (CPT-seq) and fragScaff scaffolding of a large fragment...

Soil microbial communities associated with giant sequoia: How does the world's largest tree affect some of the world's smallest organisms?

Stephen Hart, Chelsea J. Carey, Sydney I. Glassman, Thomas D. Bruns & Emma L. Aronson
Giant sequoia (Sequoiadendron giganteum) is an iconic conifer that lives in relic populations on the western slopes of the California Sierra Nevada. In these settings, it is unusual among the dominant trees in that it associates with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi rather than ectomycorrhizal fungi. However, it is unclear whether differences in microbial associations extends more broadly to non-mycorrhizal components of the soil microbial community. To address this question, we characterized microbiomes associated with giant sequoia...

Beyond leaf habit: generalities in plant function across 97 tropical dry forest tree species

German Vargas G., Tim J. Brodribb, Juan M. Dupuy, Roy González‐M., Catherine M. Hulshof, David Medvigy, Tristan A. P. Allerton, Camila Pizano, Beatriz Salgado‐Negret, Naomi B. Schwartz, Skip J. Van Bloem, Bonnie G. Waring & Jennifer S. Powers
Leaf habit has been hypothesized to define a linkage between the slow-fast plant economic spectrum and the drought resistance-avoidance trade-off in tropical forests (‘slow-safe versus fast-risky’). However, variation in hydraulic traits as a function of leaf habit has rarely been explored for a large number of species. We sampled leaf and branch functional traits of 97 tropical dry forest tree species from four sites to investigate whether patterns of trait variation varied consistently in relation...

Data from: Evidence for arrested succession in a liana‐infested Amazonian forest

Blaise Tymen, Maxime Réjou-Méchain, James W. Dalling, Sophie Fauset, Ted R. Feldausch, Natalia Norden, Oliver L. Phillips, Benjamin L. Turner, Jérôme Viers & Jérôme Chave
1. Empirical evidence and modelling both suggest that global changes may lead to an increased dominance of lianas, and thus to an increased prevalence of liana-infested forest formations in tropical forests. The implications for tropical forest structure and the carbon cycle remain poorly understood. 2. We studied the ecological processes underpinning the structure and dynamics of a liana-infested forest in French Guiana, using a combination of long-term surveys (tree, liana, seedling and litterfall), soil chemical...

Data from: Genomic diversity, population structure, and migration following rapid range expansion in the balsam poplar, Populus balsamifera

Stephen R. Keller, Matthew S. Olson, Salim Silim, William Schroeder & Peter Tiffin
Rapid range expansions can cause pervasive changes in the genetic diversity and structure of populations. The post-glacial history of the Balsam Poplar, Populus balsamifera, involved the colonization of most of northern North America, an area largely covered by continental ice sheets during the last glacial maximum. To characterize how this expansion shaped genomic diversity within and among populations, we developed 412 SNP markers that we assayed for a range-wide sample of 474 individuals sampled from...

Data from: Environmental gradients and the evolution of successional habitat specialization: a test case with 14 Neotropical forest sites

Susan G. Letcher, Jesse R. Lasky, Robin L. Chazdon, Natalia Norden, S. Joseph Wright, Jorge A. Meave, Eduardo A. Pérez-García, Rodrigo Muñoz, Eunice Romero-Pérez, Ana Andrade, José Luis Andrade, Patricia Balvanera, Justin M. Becknell, Tony V. Bentos, Radika Bhaskar, Frans Bongers, Vanessa Boukili, Pedro H. S. Brancalion, Ricardo G. César, Deborah A. Clark, David B. Clark, Dylan Craven, Alexander DeFrancesco, Juan M. Dupuy, Bryan Finegan … & G. Bruce Williamson
1. Successional gradients are ubiquitous in nature, yet few studies have systematically examined the evolutionary origins of taxa that specialize at different successional stages. Here we quantify successional habitat specialization in Neotropical forest trees and evaluate its evolutionary lability along a precipitation gradient. Theoretically, successional habitat specialization should be more evolutionarily conserved in wet forests than in dry forests due to more extreme microenvironmental differentiation between early and late successional stages in wet forest. 2....

Data from: Heterosis and outbreeding depression in crosses between natural populations of Arabidopsis thaliana

Christopher G. Oakley, Jon Ågren & Douglas W. Schemske
Understanding the causes and architecture of genetic differentiation between natural populations is of central importance in evolutionary biology. Crosses between natural populations can result in heterosis if recessive or nearly recessive deleterious mutations have become fixed within populations because of genetic drift. Divergence between populations can also result in outbreeding depression because of genetic incompatibilities. The net fitness consequences of between-population crosses will be a balance between heterosis and outbreeding depression. We estimated the magnitude...

Data from: Functional mismatch in a bumble bee pollination mutualism under climate change

Nicole E. Miller-Struttmann, Jennifer C. Geib, James D. Franklin, Peter G. Kevan, Ricardo M. Holdo, Diane Ebert-May, Austin M. Lynn, Jessica A. Kettenbach, Elizabeth Hedrick & Candace Galen
Ecological partnerships, or mutualisms, are globally widespread, sustaining agriculture and biodiversity. Mutualisms evolve through the matching of functional traits between partners, such as tongue length of pollinators and flower tube depth of plants. Long-tongued pollinators specialize on flowers with deep corolla tubes, whereas shorter-tongued pollinators generalize across tube lengths. Losses of functional guilds because of shifts in global climate may disrupt mutualisms and threaten partner species. We found that in two alpine bumble bee species,...

Data from: Effect of expanded variation in anther position on pollinator visitation to wild radish, Raphanus raphanistrum

Yuval Sapir, Keith Karoly, Vanessa A. Koelling, Heather F. Sahli, Frances N. Knapczyk & Jeffrey K. Conner
Background and Aims: Plant-pollinator interactions shape the evolution of flowers. Floral attraction and reward traits have often been shown to affect pollinator behavior, but the possible effect of efficiency traits on visitation behavior has rarely been addressed. Here we tested for the effect of anther position, usually considered a trait that influences efficiency of pollen deposition on pollinators, on pollinator visitation rates and visit duration in flowers of wild radish, Raphanus raphanistrum. Methods: We used...

Data from: Heterochronic developmental shifts underlie floral diversity within Jaltomata (Solanaceae)

Jamie L. Kostyun, Jill C. Preston & Leonie C. Moyle
Background: Heterochronic shifts during mid- to late stages of organismal development have been proposed as key mechanisms generating phenotypic diversity. To determine whether late heterochronic shifts underlie derived floral morphologies within Jaltomata (Solanaceae)—a genus whose species have extensive and recently evolved floral diversity—we compared floral development of four diverse species (including an ambiguously ancestral or secondarily derived rotate, two putatively independently evolved campanulate, and a tubular morph) to the ancestral rotate floral form, as well...

ABCB transporters in a leaf beetle respond to sequestered plant toxins

Paulina Kowalski, Michael Baum, Marcel Koerten, Alexander Donath & Susanne Dobler
Phytophagous insects can tolerate and detoxify toxic compounds present in their host plants and have evolved intricate adaptations to this end. Some insects even sequester the toxins for their defense. This necessitates specific mechanisms, especially carrier proteins that regulate uptake and transport to specific storage sites or protect sensitive tissues from noxious compounds. We identified three ATP-binding cassette subfamily B (ABCB) transporters from the transcriptome of the cardenolide-sequestering leaf beetle Chrysochus auratus and analyzed their...

Field‐based individual plant phenotyping of herbaceous species by unmanned aerial vehicle

Wei Guo, Yuya Fukano, Koji Noshita & Seishi Ninomiya
1. Recent advances in Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAVs) and image processing have made high-throughput field phenotyping possible at plot/canopy level in the mass grown experiment. Such techniques are now expected to be used for individual level phenotyping in the single grown experiment. 2. We found two main challenges of phenotyping individual plants in the single grown experiment: plant segmentation from weedy backgrounds and the estimation of complex traits that are difficult to measure manurally. 3....

Habitat selection of foraging male Great Snipes on floodplain meadows: importance of proximity to the lek, vegetation cover and bare ground

Michał Korniluk, Paweł Białomyzy, Grzegorz Grygoruk, Łukasz Kozub, Marcin Sielezniew, Piotr Świętochowski, Tomasz Tumiel, Marcin Wereszczuk & Przemysław Chylarecki
Drainage of wetlands and agricultural intensification has resulted in serious biodiversity loss in Europe, not least in grasslands. Consequently, many meadow birds have drastically declined, and the habitats they select for breeding currently rely on land management. However, the selection of habitats maintained by agriculture may contribute to reduced fitness and thus remain maladaptive for individuals, which makes conservation challenging. An understanding of the relationships between species’ habitat selection, food supply and land management in...

Data from: Ecology and genomics of an important crop wild relative as a prelude to agricultural innovation

Eric J. B. Von Wettberg, Peter L Chang, Fatma Başdemir, Noelia Carrasquila-Garcia, Lijalem Korbu, Susan M. Moenga, Gashaw Bedada, Alex Greenlon, Ken S. Moriuchi, Vasantika Suryawanshi, Matilde A Cordeiro, Nina V. Noujdina, Kassaye Negash Dinegde, Syed Gul Abbas Shah Sani, Tsegaye Getahun, Lisa Vance, Emily Bergmann, Donna Lindsay, Bullo Erena Mamo, Emily J. Warschefsky, Emmanuel Dacosta-Calheiros, Edward Marques, Mustafa Abdullah Yilmaz, Ahmet Murat Cakmak, Janna Rose … & Douglas R. Cook
Domesticated species are impacted in unintended ways during domestication and breeding. Changes in the nature and intensity of selection impart genetic drift, reduce diversity, and increase the frequency of deleterious alleles. Such outcomes constrain our ability to expand the cultivation of crops into environments that differ from those under which domestication occurred. We address this need in chickpea, an important pulse legume, by harnessing the diversity of wild crop relatives. We document an extreme domestication-related...

Data from: The impact of hurricanes Irma and Maria on the forest ecosystems of Saba and St. Eustatius, northern Caribbean

Maarten B. Eppinga, Carolyn A. Pucko. & Carolyn A. Pucko
In September 2017, Irma became the first recorded category 5 hurricane to hit the Caribbean Windward Islands. The second category 5, Maria, followed two weeks later. In November 2017, we assessed the structural impact of this disturbance on highly valued Caribbean forest ecosystems. We recorded the status of 935 tree stems on Saba and St. Eustatius in stands at different elevations. Tree damage was substantial on both islands, with 93% of stems being defoliated, 84%...

Data from: Genome sequences of two diploid wild relatives of cultivated sweetpotato reveal targets for genetic improvement

Shan Wu, Kin H. Lau, Qinghe Cao, John P. Hamilton, Honghe Sun, Chenxi Zhou, Lauren Eserman, Dorcus Gemenet, Bode Olukolu, Haiyan Wang, Emily Crisovan, Grant T. Godden, Chen Jiao, Xin Wang, Mercy Kitavi, Norma Manrique-Carpintero, Brieanne Vaillancourt, Krystle Wiegert-Rininger, Xinsun Yang, Kan Bao, Yi Zheng, Jennifer Schaff, Jan Kreuze, Wolfgang Gruneberg, Awais Khan … & Zhangjun Fei
I_triloba_NSP323_stress_FPKM_expression_matrix_v3_anno.xlsxFPKM values of v3 high confidence gene models for 15 I. triloba abiotic and biotic stress RNA-seq libraries. The libraries are described in the 'Library Key' worksheet.I_triloba_NSP323_FPKM_expression_matrix_v3_anno.xlsxFPKM values of v3 high confidence gene models for 6 I. triloba RNA-seq libraries (flower, flowerbud, leaf, root1, root2, stem).NSP323_triloba_v3.hc.func_anno.txtPutative functional annotation of high confidence gene models.NSP323_triloba_v3.hc.gene_models.cdna.faNucleotide sequences of the high confidence gene model transcript sequences (cDNA).NSP323_triloba_v3.hc.gene_models.cds.faNucleotide sequences of the high confidence gene model coding sequences (CDS).NSP323_triloba_v3.hc.gene_models.gff3High confidence gene...

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