59 Works

Data from: The relative contribution of natural landscapes and human-mediated factors on the connectivity of a noxious invasive weed

Diego F. Alvarado-Serrano, Megan L. Van Etten, Shu-Mei Chang & Regina S. Baucom
Examining how the landscape may influence gene flow is at the forefront of understanding population differentiation and adaptation. Such understanding is crucial in light of ongoing environmental changes and the elevated risk of ecosystems alteration. In particular, knowledge of how humans may influence population structure is imperative to allow for informed decisions in management and conservation as well as to gain a better understanding of anthropogenic impacts on the interplay between gene flow, genetic drift...

Data from: A study of the transit amplification divisions during spermatogenesis in Oncopeltus fasciatus to assess plasticity in sperm numbers or sperm viability under different diets

Ashley E. Duxbury, Brandie Weathersby, Zachary Sanchez & Patricia J. Moore
Oncopeltus fasciatus males fed the ancestral diet of milkweed seeds prioritize reproduction over lifespan as evidenced by higher rates of fertility and shorter lifespans than males from the same population fed the adapted diet of sunflower seeds. We examined the proximate mechanisms by which milkweed-fed males maintained late-life fertility. We tested the hypothesis that older milkweed-fed males maintained fertility by producing more, higher quality sperm. Our results, that older males have more sperm, but their...

Data from: Free‐moving artificial eggs containing temperature loggers reveal remarkable within‐clutch variance in incubation temperature

Sydney F. Hope, Sarah E. DuRant, John J. Hallagan, Michelle L. Beck, Robert A. Kennamer & William A. Hopkins
Incubation is a crucial aspect of avian parental care and measuring incubation temperature in the wild can improve our understanding of life history tradeoffs and inform conservation efforts. However, there are challenges associated with measuring the temperature of eggs in natural nests. Most studies to date have measured incubation temperature by using a single, stationary logger in each nest. However, real eggs are rotated and moved throughout the nest by the parent during the incubation...

Data from: Lifespan bias explains live-dead discordance in abundance of two common bivalves

Kelly E. Cronin, Gregory P. Dietl, Patricia H. Kelley & Stewart M. Edie
Lifespan bias potentially alters species abundance in death assemblages through the overrepresentation of short-lived organisms compared to their long-lived counterparts. Although previous work found that lifespan bias did not contribute significantly to live-dead discordance in bivalve assemblages, lifespan bias better explained discordance in two groups: longer-lived bivalve species and species with known lifespans. More studies using local, rather than global, species-wide, lifespans and mortality rates would help to determine the prevalence of lifespan bias, especially...

Data from: Undocumented beetle diversity in the Southeastern United States: a case study of the minute clubbed beetles (Coleoptera: Monotomidae)

Thomas C. McElrath & Joseph V. McHugh
Studies of the saproxylic and predatory beetle family Monotomidae (Coleoptera: Cucujoidea) in the southeastern USA increased the known diversity for the family in the state of Georgia by one genus and nine species. Online records of Monotomidae from Georgia increased from 0 to 885. This work highlights the lack of basic diversity information about small beetles that inhabit wood, leaf litter, and other decaying plant matter in this region.

Data from: Social living simultaneously increases infection risk and decreases the cost of infection

Vanessa O. Ezenwa, Katherine E.L. Worsley-Tonks & Katherine E. L. Worsley-Tonks
Elevated parasite infection risk is considered to be a near universal cost of social living. However, living in groups may also provide benefits that reduce the negative impacts of infection. These potential ‘tolerance’ benefits of living socially are theoretically possible, but have rarely been described. In this study, we used an anthelmintic treatment experiment in wild Grant’s gazelles (Nanger granti), who are commonly infected with gastrointestinal nematodes (GIN), to show that social living confers both...

Data from: Diet and trophic interactions of a circumglobally significant gelatinous marine zooplankter, Dolioletta gegenbauri (Uljanin, 1884)

Tina L. Walters, Lauren M. Lamboley, Natalia B. Lopez-Figueroa, Aurea E. Rodriguez-Santiago, Deidre M. Gibson & Marc E. Frischer
Gelatinous zooplankton play a crucial role in marine planktonic food webs. However, primarily due to methodological challenges, the in situ diet of zooplankton remains poorly investigated and little is known about their trophic interactions including feeding behavior, prey selection, and in situ feeding rates. This is particularly true for gelatinous zooplankton including the marine pelagic tunicate, Dolioletta gegenbauri. In this study, we applied an 18S rRNA amplicon metabarcoding approach to identify the diet of captive-fed...

Data from: Machine learning to classify animal species in camera trap images: applications in ecology

Micheal A. Tabak, Mohammad Sadegh Norouzzadeh, Michael A. Tabak, David W. Wolfson, Steven J. Sweeney, Paul A. Di Salvo, Ryan S. Miller, Jesse S. Lewis, Jeff Clune, Ryan K. Brook, Elizabeth G. Mandeville, Paul M. Lukacs, Anna K. Moeller, Raoul K. Boughton, Bethany Wight, James C. Beasley & Peter E. Schlichting
Motion‐activated cameras (“camera traps”) are increasingly used in ecological and management studies for remotely observing wildlife and are amongst the most powerful tools for wildlife research. However, studies involving camera traps result in millions of images that need to be analysed, typically by visually observing each image, in order to extract data that can be used in ecological analyses. We trained machine learning models using convolutional neural networks with the ResNet‐18 architecture and 3,367,383 images...

Data from: A fast-evolving X-linked duplicate of importin-α2 is overexpressed in sex-ratio drive in Drosophila neotestacea

Kathleen E. Pieper, Robert L. Unckless & Kelly A. Dyer
Selfish genetic elements that manipulate gametogenesis to achieve a transmission advantage are known as meiotic drivers. Sex-ratio X-chromosomes (SR) are meiotic drivers that prevent the maturation of Y-bearing sperm in male carriers to result in the production of mainly female progeny. The spread of an SR chromosome can affect host genetic diversity and genome evolution, and can even cause host extinction if it reaches sufficiently high prevalence. Meiotic drivers have evolved independently many times, though...

Data from: Impacts of biomass production at civil airports on grassland bird conservation and aviation strike risk

Tara J. Conkling, Jerrold L. Belant, Travis L. DeVault & James A. Martin
Growing concerns about climate change, foreign oil dependency, and environmental quality have fostered interest in perennial native grasses (e.g. switchgrass [Panicum virgatum]) for bioenergy production while also maintaining biodiversity and ecosystem function. However, biomass cultivation in marginal landscapes such as airport grasslands may have detrimental effects on aviation safety as well as conservation efforts for grassland birds. In 2011–2013 we investigated effects of vegetation composition and harvest frequency on seasonal species richness and habitat use...

Data from: Private land conservation has landscape-scale benefits for wildlife in agroecosystems

John M. Yeiser, John J. Morgan, Danna L. Baxley, Richard B. Chandler & James A. Martin
Private lands contain much of the world's biodiversity. Conservation of private land, especially agricultural land, is urgent yet challenging because of the diverse priorities of landowners. Local effects of farmland conservation programmes have been evaluated thoroughly, but population-level response to these programmes may depend on effects that extend beyond targeted land parcels. We investigated the landscape-scale effects of a grassland conservation initiative, the Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program (CREP), on a socially and economically important gamebird,...

Data from: Hotspot mutations and ColE1 plasmids contribute to the fitness of Salmonella Heidelberg in poultry litter

Adelumola Oladeinde, Kimberly Cook, Alex Orlek, Greg Zock, Kyler Herrington, Nelson Cox, Jodie Plumblee Lawrence & Carolina Hall
Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Heidelberg (S. Heidelberg) is a clinically-important serovar linked to food-borne illness, and commonly isolated from poultry. Investigations of a large, multistate outbreak in the USA in 2013 identified poultry litter (PL) as an important extra-intestinal environment that may have selected for specific S. Heidelberg strains. Poultry litter is a mixture of bedding materials and chicken excreta that contains chicken gastrointestinal (GI) bacteria, undigested feed, feathers, and other materials of chicken...

Data from: Estimating environmental suitability

John M. Drake & Robert L. Richards
Methods for modeling species’ distributions in nature are typically evaluated empirically with respect to data from observations of species occurrence and, occasionally, absence at surveyed locations. Such models are relatively “theory‐free.” In contrast, theories for explaining species’ distributions draw on concepts like fitness, niche, and environmental suitability. This paper proposes that environmental suitability be defined as the conditional probability of occurrence of a species given the state of the environment at a location. Any quantity...

Data from: Male body size predicts reproductive success but not within-clutch paternity patterns in gopher tortoises (Gopherus polyphemus)

K. Nicole White, Betsie B. Rothermel, Kelly R. Zamudio & Tracey D. Tuberville
In many vertebrates, body size is an important driver of variation in male reproductive success. Larger, more fit individuals are more likely to dominate mating opportunities, skewing siring success and resulting in lower effective population sizes and genetic diversity. The mating system of the gopher tortoise (Gopherus polyphemus) has been characterized as both female-defense and scramble-competition polygyny. Mating systems are typically not fixed and can be influenced by factors such as population density, demographic structure,...

Data from: Formation of a recent hybrid zone offers insight to the geographic puzzle and maintenance of species boundaries in musk turtles

Peter A. Scott, Travis C. Glenn & Leslie J. Rissler
Speciation is the result of an accumulation of reproductive barriers between populations, pinpointing these factors is often difficult. However, hybrid zones can form when these barriers are not complete, especially when lineages come into contact in intermediate or modified habitats. We examine a hybrid zone between two closely related riverine turtle species, Sternotherus depressus and S. peltifer, and use ddRAD sequencing to to understand how this hybrid zone formed and elucidate genomic patterns of reproductive...

O-specific polysaccharide confers lysozyme resistance to extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli

Yinli Bao, Haobo Zhang, Xinxin Huang, Jiale Ma, Catherine M. Logue, Lisa K. Nolan & Ganwu Li
Extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) is the leading cause of bloodstream and other extraintestinal infections in human and animals. The greatest challenge encountered by ExPEC during an infection is posed by the host defense mechanisms, including lysozyme. ExPEC have developed diverse strategies to overcome this challenge. The aim of this study was to characterize the molecular mechanism of ExPEC resistance to lysozyme. For this, 15,000 transposon mutants of a lysozyme-resistant ExPEC strain NMEC38 were screened;...

Data from: Linking the vectorial capacity of multiple vectors to observed patterns of West Nile virus transmission

Joseph R. McMillan, Rebekah A. Blakney, Daniel G. Mead, William T. Koval, Sarah M. Coker, Lance A. Waller, Uriel Kitron & Gonzalo M. Vazquez-Prokopec
1. Theoretical models suggest that increased vector species participation in pathogen transmission significantly increases the prevalence of vector and host infections. However, there has been a lack of empirical evidence to support this. 2. We linked transmission potential of multiple vectors species to observed patterns of enzootic pathogen transmission by conducting longitudinal field surveillance of West Nile virus (WNv) infections in Culex spp. mosquitoes and avian host communities in the southeastern U.S. We then used...

Data from: Context-dependent costs and benefits of tuberculosis resistance traits in a wild mammalian host

Hannah F. Tavalire, Brianna R. Beechler, Peter E. Buss, Erin E. Gorsich, Eileen G. Hoal, Nikki Le Roex, Johannie M. Spaan, Robert S. Spaan, Paul D. Van Helden, Vanessa O. Ezenwa & Anna E. Jolles
Disease acts as a powerful driver of evolution in natural host populations, yet individuals in a population often vary in their susceptibility to infection. Energetic trade-offs between immune and reproductive investment lead to the evolution of distinct life-history strategies, driven by the relative fitness costs and benefits of resisting infection. However, examples quantifying the cost of resistance outside of the laboratory are rare. Here, we observe two distinct forms of resistance to bovine tuberculosis (bTB),...

Data from: Animal-mediated organic matter transformation: aquatic insects as a source of microbially bioavailable organic nutrients and energy

Thomas B. Parr, Krista A. Capps, Shreeram P. Inamdar & Kari A. Metcalf
1. Animal communities are essential drivers of energy and elemental flow in ecosystems. However, few studies have investigated the functional role of animals as sources of dissolved organic matter (DOM) and the subsequent utilization of that DOM by the microbial community. 2. In a small forested headwater stream, we tested the effects of taxonomy, feeding traits, and body size on the quality and quantity of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) excreted...

Data from: Predictable gene expression related to behavioral variation in parenting

Kyle M. Benowitz, Elizabeth C. McKinney, Christopher B. Cunningham & Allen J. Moore
Differential gene expression has been associated with transitions between behavioral states for a wide variety of organisms and behaviors. Heterochrony, genetic toolkits, and predictable pathways underlying behavioral transitions have been hypothesized to explain the relationship between transcription and behavioral changes. Less studied is how variation in transcription is related to variation within a behavior, and if the genes that are associated with this variation are predictable. Here we adopt an evolutionary systems biology perspective to...

Data from: Genetic dissection of hybrid male sterility across stages of spermatogenesis

Denise J. Schwahn, Richard J. Wang, Michael A. White & Bret A. Payseur
Hybrid sterility is a common form of reproductive isolation between nascent species. Although hybrid sterility is routinely documented and genetically dissected in speciation studies, its developmental basis is rarely examined, especially in generations beyond the F1. To identify phenotypic and genetic determinants of hybrid male sterility from a developmental perspective, we characterized testis histology in 312 F2 hybrids generated by intercrossing inbred strains of Mus musculus domesticus and M. m. musculus, two subspecies of house...

Data from: Phylogenetic patterns of trait and trait plasticity evolution: Insights from amphibian embryos

Rick Relyea, Patrick R. Stephens, Lisa N. Barrow, Andrew Blaustein, Paul Bradley, Julia Buck, Ann Chang, Brian I Crother, James Collins, Julia Earl, Stephanie S. Gervasi, Jason T. Hoverman, Olliver Hyman, Emily Claire Moriarty Lemmon, Thomas Luhring, Moses Michelsohn, Christopher M. Murray, Steven Price, Raymond Semlitsch, Andy Sih, Aaron Stoler, Nick VandenBroek, Alexa Warwick, Greta Wengert, John Hammond … & Aaron B. Stoler
Environmental variation favors the evolution of phenotypic plasticity. For many species, we understand the costs and benefits of different phenotypes, but we lack a broad understanding of how plastic traits evolve across large clades. Using identical experiments conducted across North America, we examined prey responses to predator cues. We quantified five life history traits and the magnitude of their plasticity for 23 amphibian species/populations (spanning three families and five genera) when exposed to no cues,...

Data from: Effects of vulture exclusion on carrion consumption by facultative scavengers

Jacob E. Hill, Travis L. DeVault, James C. Beasley, , Jerrold L. Belant & Olin E. Rhodes
Vultures provide an essential ecosystem service through removal of carrion, but globally, many populations are collapsing and several species are threatened with extinction. Widespread declines in vulture populations could increase the availability of carrion to other organisms, but the ways facultative scavengers might respond to this increase have not been thoroughly explored. We aimed to determine whether facultative scavengers increase carrion consumption in the absence of vulture competition and whether they are capable of functionally...

Data from: Drivers of vegetative dormancy across herbaceous perennial plant species

Richard P. Shefferson, Tiiu Kull, Michael J. Hutchings, Marc-André Selosse, Hans Jacquemyn, Kimberly M. Kellett, Eric S. Menges, Richard B. Primack, Juha Tuomi, Kirsi Alahuhta, Sonja Hurskainen, Helen M. Alexander, Derek S. Anderson, Rein Brys, Emilia Brzosko, Slavomir Dostálik, Katharine Gregg, Zdeněk Ipser, Anne Jäkäläniemi, Jana Jersáková, W. Dean Kettle, Melissa K. McCormick, Ana Mendoza, Michael T. Miller, Asbjørn Moen … & Dennis F. Whigham
Vegetative dormancy, that is the temporary absence of aboveground growth for ≥ 1 year, is paradoxical, because plants cannot photosynthesise or flower during dormant periods. We test ecological and evolutionary hypotheses for its widespread persistence. We show that dormancy has evolved numerous times. Most species displaying dormancy exhibit life‐history costs of sprouting, and of dormancy. Short‐lived and mycoheterotrophic species have higher proportions of dormant plants than long‐lived species and species with other nutritional modes. Foliage...

Data from: Grass competition overwhelms effects of herbivores and precipitation on early tree establishment in Serengeti

Thomas A. Morrison, Ricardo M. Holdo, Deusdedith M. Rugemalila, Mawazo Nzunda & T. Michael Anderson
1. Savanna ecosystems span a diverse range of climates, edaphic conditions and disturbance regimes, the complexity of which has stimulated long-standing interest in the mechanisms that maintain tree-grass coexistence. One hypothesis suggests that tree establishment is strongly limited by one or several demographic bottlenecks at early stages of the tree life cycle. A major impediment to testing this hypothesis is the lack of data on the relative strengths of different bottlenecks across key environmental gradients....

Registration Year

  • 2018
    59

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    59

Affiliations

  • University of Georgia
    59
  • Cornell University
    5
  • Indiana University Bloomington
    4
  • University of Florida
    4
  • University of Alberta
    3
  • United States Department of Agriculture
    3
  • University of Missouri
    3
  • Emory University
    3
  • University of Kansas
    2
  • University of Montana
    2