9 Works

Data from: In and out of refugia: historical patterns of diversity and demography in the North American Caesar’s mushroom species complex

Santiago Sánchez-Ramirez, Rodham E. Tulloss, Laura Guzmán-Davalos, Joaquín Cifuentes-Blanco, Ricardo Valenzuela, Arturo Estrada-Torres, Felipe Ruán-Soto, Raúl Díaz-Moreno, Nallely Hernández-Rico, Mariano Torres-Gómez, Hugo León & Jean-Marc Moncalvo
Some of the effects of past climate dynamics on plant and animal diversity make-up have been relatively well studied, but to less extent in fungi. Pleistocene refugia are thought to harbor high biological diversity (i.e. phylogenetic lineages and genetic diversity), mainly as a product of increased reproductive isolation and allele conservation. In addition, high extinction rates and genetic erosion is expected in previously glaciated regions. Some of the consequences of past climate dynamics might involve...

Data from: Evolution of sexual dimorphism in phenotypic covariance structure in Phymata

David Punzalan & Locke Rowe
Sexual dimorphism is a consequence of both sex-specific selection and potential constraints imposed by a shared genetic architecture underlying sexually homologous traits. However, genetic architecture is expected to evolve to mitigate these constraints, allowing the sexes to approach their respective optimal mean phenotype. In additon, sex-specific selection is expected to generate sexual dimorphism of trait covariance structure (e.g. the phenotypic covariance matrix, P) but previous empirical work has not fully addressed this prediction. We compared...

Data from: A new species of Peckoltia from the Upper Orinoco (Siluriformes: Loricariidae)

Jonathan Armbruster, Nathan Lujan, Jonathan W. Armbruster & Nathan K. Lujan
A new species of the suckermouth armored catfish genus Peckoltia is described from the lower Ventuari River, a tributary of the upper Orinoco River in Amazonas State, Venezuela. Specimens of this species were formerly included in the wide-ranging Amazonian species P. vittata, but a recent molecular phylogeny found Orinoco individuals to be distantly related to Amazon Basin individuals spanning the range of P. vittata syntypes. Detailed morphological examination confirmed distinctiveness of Orinoco specimens, and found...

Data from: A new family of Cambrian rhynchonelliformean brachiopods (Order Naukatida) with an aberrant coral-like morphology

Michael Streng, Aodhán D. Butler, John S. Peel, Russell J. Garwood & Jean-Bernard Caron
Tomteluva perturbata gen. et sp. nov. and Nasakia thulensis gen. et sp. nov., two new rhynchonelliformean brachiopod taxa, are described from carbonate beds from the lower middle Cambrian (Series 3, Stage 5) basinal Stephen Formation, Canada, and the upper lower Cambrian (Series 2, Stage 4) Henson Gletscher Formation, North Greenland, respectively. The two taxa are characterized by an unusual coral-like morphology typified by a high conical ventral valve with an anteriorly curved umbo and a...

Data from: Assessing models of speciation under different biogeographic scenarios; an empirical study using multi-locus and RNA-seq analyses

Taylor Edwards, Marc Tollis, PingHsun Hsieh, Ryan N. Gutenkunst, Zhen Liu, Kenro Kusumi, Melanie Culver & Robert W. Murphy
Evolutionary biology often seeks to decipher the drivers of speciation, and much debate persists over the relative importance of isolation and gene flow in the formation of new species. Genetic studies of closely related species can assess if gene flow was present during speciation, because signatures of past introgression often persist in the genome. We test hypotheses on which mechanisms of speciation drove diversity among three distinct lineages of desert tortoise in the genus Gopherus....

Data from: High speciation rate at temperate latitudes explains unusual diversity gradients in a clade of ectomycorrhizal fungi

Santiago Sanchez-Ramirez, Rampal S. Etienne & Jean-Marc Moncalvo
Understanding the patterns of biodiversity through time and space is a challenging task. However, phylogeny-based macroevolutionary models allow us to account and measure many of the processes responsible for diversity build-up, namely speciation and extinction. The general latitudinal diversity gradient (LDG) is a well-recognized pattern describing a decline in species richness from the equator pole-wards. Recent macroecological studies in ectomycorrhizal (EM) fungi have shown that their LDG is shifted, peaking at temperate rather than tropical...

Data from: Shaping species with ephemeral boundaries: the distribution and genetic structure of the desert tortoise (Gopherus morafkai) in the Sonoran Desert region

Taylor Edwards, Mercy Vaughn, Philip C. Rosen, Cristina Meléndez Torres, Alice E. Karl, Melanie Culver & Robert W. Murphy
Aim: We examine the role biogeographical features played in the evolution of Morafka's desert tortoise (Gopherus morafkai) and test the hypothesis that G. morafkai maintains genetically distinct lineages associated with different Sonoran Desert biomes. Increased knowledge of the past and present distribution of the Sonoran Desert region's biota provides insight into the forces that drive and maintain its biodiversity. Location: Sonoran Desert biogeographical region; Sonora and Sinaloa, Mexico and Arizona, USA. Methods: We examined wild...

Data from: Speciation processes in putative island endemic sister bat species: false impressions from mitochondrial DNA and microsatellite data

Hao-Chih Kuo, Shiang-Fan Chen, Yin-Ping Fang, James A. Cotton, Joe D. Parker, Gábor Csorba, Burton K. Lim, Judith L. Eger, Chia-Hong Chen, Cheng-Han Chou & Stephen J. Rossiter
Cases of geographically restricted co-occurring sister taxa are rare and may point to potential divergence with gene flow. The two bat species Murina gracilis and M. recondita are both endemic to Taiwan and are putative sister species. To test for non-allopatric divergence and gene flow in these taxa, we generated sequences using Sanger and Next Generation Sequencing, and combined these with microsatellite data for coalescent-based analyses. MtDNA phylogenies supported the reciprocally monophyletic sister relationship between...

Data from: A large new leanchoiliid from the Burgess Shale and the influence of inapplicable states on stem arthropod phylogeny

Cédric Aria, Jean-Bernard Caron & Robert Gaines
Characterized by atypical frontalmost appendages, leanchoiliids are early arthropods whose phylogenetic placement has been much debated. Morphological interpretations have differed, some of which concern critical characters such as the number of eyes and head appendages, but methodological approaches also have diverged. Here, we describe a new leanchoiliid, Yawunik kootenayi gen. et sp. nov., based on 42 specimens from the newly discovered Marble Canyon locality of the Burgess Shale (Kootenay National Park, British Columbia; middle Cambrian)....

Registration Year

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  • Royal Ontario Museum
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  • University of Toronto
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  • University of Arizona
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  • CIUDAD
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  • Pomona College
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  • University of Groningen
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  • Universidad de Ciencias y Artes de Chiapas
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  • Autonomous University of Tlaxcala
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  • Queen Mary University of London
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  • University of Manchester
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