245 Works

Data from: Local adaptation with high gene flow: temperature parameters drive adaptation to altitude in the common frog (Rana temporaria)

Anna P. Muir, Roman Biek, Rob Thomas & Barbara K. Mable
Both environmental- and genetic-influences can result in phenotypic variation. Quantifying the relative contributions of local adaptation and phenotypic plasticity to phenotypes is key to understanding the effect of environmental variation on populations. Identifying the selective pressures that drive divergence is an important, but often lacking, next step. High gene flow between high- and low-altitude common frog (Rana temporaria) breeding sites has previously been demonstrated in Scotland. The aim of this study was to assess whether...

Data from: Laboratory colonisation and genetic bottlenecks in the tsetse fly Glossina pallidipes

Marc Ciosi, Daniel K. Masiga & Charles M. R. Turner
Background: The IAEA colony is the only one available for mass rearing of Glossina pallidipes, a vector of human and animal African trypanosomiasis in eastern Africa. This colony is the source for Sterile Insect Technique (SIT) programs in East Africa. The source population of this colony is unclear and its genetic diversity has not previously been evaluated and compared to field populations. Methodology/Principal Findings: We examined the genetic variation within and between the IAEA colony...

Data from: Crater lake habitat predicts morphological diversity in adaptive radiations of cichlid fishes

Hans Recknagel, Kathryn Rebecca Elmer & Axel Meyer
Adaptive radiations provide an excellent opportunity for studying the correlates and causes for the origin of biodiversity. In these radiations, species diversity may be influenced by either the ecological and physical environment, intrinsic lineage effects, or both. Disentangling the relative contributions of these factors in generating biodiversity remains a major challenge in understanding why a lineage does or does not radiate. Here, we examined morphological variation in body shape for replicate flocks of Nicaraguan Midas...

Data from: Aerobic scope predicts dominance during early life in a tropical damselfish

Shaun S. Killen, Matthew D. Mitchell, Jodie L. Rummer, Douglas P. Chivers, Maud C. O. Ferrari, Mark I. McCormick & Mark G. Meekan
A range of physiological traits are linked with aggression and dominance within social hierarchies, but the role of individual aerobic capacity in facilitating aggression has seldom been studied. Further, links previously observed between an individual's metabolic rate and aggression level may be context dependent and modulated by factors such as social stress and competitor familiarity. We examined these issues in juvenile Ambon damselfish, Pomacentrus amboinensis, which display intraspecific competition for territories during settlement on coral...

Data from: Using genetic variation to infer associations with climate in the common frog, Rana temporaria

Anna P. Muir, Rob Thomas, Roman Biek & Barbara K. Mable
Recent and historical species' associations with climate can be inferred using molecular markers. This knowledge of population and species-level responses to climatic variables can then be used to predict the potential consequences of ongoing climate change. The aim of this study was to predict responses of Rana temporaria to environmental change in Scotland by inferring historical and contemporary patterns of gene flow in relation to current variation in local thermal conditions. We first inferred colonization...

Data from: Individuals with higher metabolic rates have lower levels of reactive oxygen species hydrogen peroxide in vivo

Karine Salin, Sonya K. Auer, Agata M. Rudolf, Graeme J. Anderson, Andrew G. Cairns, William Mullen, Richard C. Hartley, Colin Selman & Neil B. Metcalfe
There is increasing interest in the effect of energy metabolism on oxidative stress, but much ambiguity over the relationship between the rate of oxygen consumption and the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Production of ROS (such as hydrogen peroxide, H2O2) in the mitochondria is primarily inferred indirectly from measurements in vitro, which may not reflect actual ROS production in living animals. Here, we measured in vivo H2O2 content using the recently developed MitoB probe...

Data from: What causes mating system shifts in plants? Arabidopsis lyrata as a case study

Barbara K. Mable, Joerg Hagmann, Sang-Tae Kim, Aileen Adam, Elizabeth Kilbride, Detlef Weigel & Marc Stift
The genetic breakdown of self-incompatibility (SI) and subsequent mating system shifts to inbreeding has intrigued evolutionary geneticists for decades. Most of our knowledge is derived from interspecific comparisons between inbreeding species and their outcrossing relatives, where inferences may be confounded by secondary mutations that arose after the initial loss of SI. Here, we study an intraspecific breakdown of SI and its consequences in North American Arabidopsis lyrata to test whether: (1) particular S-locus haplotypes are...

Carbon and nutrient data for rainfall fractions in the Peruvian Amazon

L. E. Vihermaa, S. Waldron & J. Newton
Aquatic carbon (dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and particulate organic carbon and the carbon isotopic composition of DIC) and nutrients (calcium, magnesium, potassium, sodium, total soluble phosphorus and silica) in rainfall fractions (rainwater, throughfall, stemflow and overland flow) were sampled in the Western Amazonian basin. The samples were collected towards the end of a wet season April - May 2012. Rainfall and throughfall samples were collected in plastic buckets. Stemflow samples were...

Data from: Coralline algae in a naturally acidified ecosystem persist by maintaining control of skeletal mineralogy and size

Nicholas A. Kamenos, Gabriela Perna, Maria Cristina Gambi, Fiorenza Micheli & Kristy J. Kroeker
To understand the effects of ocean acidification (OA) on marine calcifiers, the trade-offs among different sublethal responses within individual species and the emergent effects of these trade-offs must be determined in an ecosystem setting. Crustose coralline algae (CCA) provide a model to test the ecological consequences of such sublethal effects as they are important in ecosystem functioning, service provision, carbon cycling and use dissolved inorganic carbon to calcify and photosynthesize. Settlement tiles were placed in...

Data from: A robust and representative lower bound on object processing speed in humans

Magdalena M. Bieniek, Patrick J. Bennett, Allison B. Sekuler & Guillaume A. Rousselet
How early does the brain decode object categories? Addressing this question is critical to constrain the type of neuronal architecture supporting object categorization. In this context, much effort has been devoted to estimating face processing speed. With onsets estimated from 50 to 150 ms, the timing of the first face-sensitive responses in humans remains controversial. This controversy is due partially to the susceptibility of dynamic brain measurements to filtering distortions and analysis issues. Here, using...

Data from: Evidence of the phenotypic expression of a lethal recessive allele under inbreeding in a wild population of conservation concern

Amanda E. Trask, Eric M. Bignal, Davy I. McCracken, Pat Monaghan, Stuart B. Piertney & Jane M. Reid
Deleterious recessive alleles that are masked in outbred populations are predicted to be expressed in small, inbred populations, reducing both individual fitness and population viability. However, there are few definitive examples of phenotypic expression of lethal recessive alleles under inbreeding conditions in wild populations. Studies that demonstrate the action of such alleles, and infer their distribution and dynamics, are required to understand their potential impact on population viability and inform management responses. The Scottish population...

Data from: Male sexually coercive behaviour drives increased swimming efficiency in female guppies

Shaun S. Killen, Darren P. Croft, Karine Salin & Safi K. Darden
Sexual coercion of females by males is widespread across sexually reproducing species. It stems from a conflict of interest over reproduction and exerts selective pressure on both sexes. For females, there is often a significant energetic cost of exposure to male sexually coercive behaviours. Our understanding of the efficiency of female resistance to male sexually coercive behaviour is key to understanding how sexual conflict contributes to population level dynamics and ultimately to the evolution of...

Data from: Evaluation of two methods for minimally invasive peripheral body temperature measurement in birds

Andreas Nord, Marina Lehmann, Ross Macloed, Dominic J. McCafferty, Ruedi G. Nager, Jan-Åke Nilsson, Barbara Helm & Ross MacLeod
Body temperature (Tb) is a valuable parameter when assessing the physiological state of animals, but its widespread measurement is often constrained by methods that are invasive or require frequent recapture of animals. Alternatives based on automated remote sensing of peripheral Tb show promise, but little is known about their strengths and limitations. We measured peripheral Tb in great tits Parus major with subcutaneously implanted passive integrated transponders (PIT tags) and externally attached radio transmitters to...

Data from: Predictors and immunological correlates of sublethal mercury exposure in vampire bats

Daniel J. Becker, Matthew M. Chumchal, Alexandra B. Bentz, Steven G. Platt, Gábor A. Czirják, Thomas R. Rainwater, Sonia Altizer & Daniel G. Streicker
Mercury (Hg) is a pervasive heavy metal that often enters the environment from anthropogenic sources such as gold mining and agriculture. Chronic exposure to Hg can impair immune function, reducing the ability of animals to resist or recover from infections. How Hg influences immunity and susceptibility remains unknown for bats, which appear immunologically distinct from other mammals and are reservoir hosts of many pathogens of importance to human and animal health. We here quantify total...

Data from: Perceptually relevant speech tracking in auditory and motor cortex reflects distinct linguistic features

Anne Keitel, Joachim Gross & Christoph Kayser
During online speech processing, our brain tracks the acoustic fluctuations in speech at different timescales. Previous research has focused on generic timescales (for example, delta or theta bands) that are assumed to map onto linguistic features such as prosody or syllables. However, given the high intersubject variability in speaking patterns, such a generic association between the timescales of brain activity and speech properties can be ambiguous. Here, we analyse speech tracking in source-localised magnetoencephalographic data...

Data from: Do glucocorticoids predict fitness? Linking environmental conditions, corticosterone and reproductive success in the blue tit, Cyanistes caeruleus

Lindsay J. Henderson, Neil P. Evans, Britt J. Heidinger, Katherine A. Herborn & Kathryn E. Arnold
Glucocorticoids, including corticosterone (CORT), have been suggested to provide a physiological link between ecological conditions and fitness. Specifically, CORT, which is elevated in response to harsh conditions, is predicted to be correlated with reduced fitness. Yet, empirical studies show that CORT can be non-significantly, positively and negatively linked with fitness. Divergent environmental conditions between years or study systems may influence whether CORT is linked to fitness. To test this, we monitored free-living blue tits (Cyanistes...

Data from: PTEN controls glandular morphogenesis through a juxtamembrane β-Arrestin1/ARHGAP21 scaffolding complex

Arman Javadi, Ravi K. Deevi, Emma Evergren, Elodie Blondel-Tepaz, George S. Baillie, Mark G.H. Scott, Frederick Charles Campbell & Mark GH Scott
PTEN controls three-dimensional (3D) glandular morphogenesis by coupling juxtamembrane signalling to mitotic spindle machinery. While molecular mechanisms remain unclear, PTEN interacts through its C2 membrane-binding domain with the scaffold protein β-Arrestin1. Because β-Arrestin1 binds and suppresses the Cdc42 GTPase-activating protein ARHGAP21, we hypothesize that PTEN controls Cdc42-dependent morphogenic processes through a β-Arrestin1-ARHGAP21 complex. Here we show that PTEN knockdown (KD) impairs β-Arrestin1 membrane localization, β-Arrestin1-ARHGAP21 interactions, Cdc42 activation, mitotic spindle orientation and 3D glandular morphogenesis....

Data from: The effects of sub-curative praziquantel treatment on life-history traits and trade-offs in drug-resistant Schistosoma mansoni

Mafalda Viana, Christina L. Faust, Dan T. Haydon, Joanne P. Webster, Poppy H. L. Lamberton & Daniel T. Haydon
Natural selection acts on all organisms, including parasites, to maximise reproductive fitness. Drug resistance traits are often associated with life-history costs in the absence of treatment. Schistosomiasis control programmes rely on mass drug administration to reduce human morbidity and mortality. Although hotspots of reduced drug efficacy have been reported, resistance is not widespread. Using Bayesian State-Space Models (SSMs) fitted to data from an in vivo laboratory system, we tested the hypothesis that the spread of...

Data from: Links between parental life histories of wild salmon and the telomere lengths of their offspring

Darryl McLennan, John D. Armstrong, Dave C. Stewart, Simon Mckelvey, Winnie Boner, Pat Monaghan, Neil B. Metcalfe & David C. Stewart
The importance of parental contributions to offspring development and subsequent performance is self-evident at a genomic level; however, parents can also affect offspring fitness by indirect genetic and environmental routes. The life history strategy that an individual adopts will be influenced by both genes and environment; and this may have important consequences for offspring. Recent research has linked telomere dynamics (i.e. telomere length and loss) in early life to future viability and longevity. Moreover, a...

Data from: Local weather and body condition influence habitat use and movements on land of molting female southern elephant seals (Mirounga leonina)

Laureline L. Chaise, Iris Prinet, Camille Toscani, Susan L. Gallon, William Paterson, Dominic J. McCafferty, Marc Théry, André Ancel & Caroline Gilbert
Southern elephant seals (Mirounga leonina) are known to move and aggregate while moulting, but little is known about their behaviour on land during this time. In this study, 60 adult females were monitored (23 with GPS tags) during four moulting seasons, between 2012 and 2016 at Kerguelen Archipelago, Indian Ocean. Population surveys were recorded each year (N = 230 daily counts) and habitat use was analysed in relation to the stage of the moult and...

Data from: Rapid and dynamic alternative splicing impacts the Arabidopsis cold response transcriptome

Cristiane P. G. Calixto, Wenbin Guo, Allan B. James, Nikoleta A. Tzioutziou, Juan C. Entizne, Paige E. Panter, Heather Knight, Hugh Nimmo, Runxuan Zhang & John W. S. Brown
Plants have adapted to tolerate and survive constantly changing environmental conditions by re-programming gene expression. The dynamics of the contribution of alternative splicing (AS) to stress responses are unknown. RNA-sequencing of a time-series of Arabidopsis thaliana plants exposed to cold determines the timing of significant AS changes. This shows a massive and rapid AS response with coincident waves of transcriptional and AS activity occurring in the first few hours of temperature reduction, and further AS...

2012 Machine Learning Data Set for NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory - Atmospheric Imaging Assembly

David Fouhey, Meng Jin, Mark Cheung, Abndres Munoz-Jaramillo, Richard Galvez, Rajat Thomas, Paul Wright, Alexander Szenicer, Monica G. Bobra, Yang Liu & James Mason
We present a curated dataset from the NASA Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) mission in a format suitable for machine learning research. Beginning from level 1 scientific products we have processed various instrumental corrections, downsampled to manageable spatial and temporal resolutions, and synchronized observations spatially and temporally. We anticipate this curated dataset will facilitate machine learning research in heliophysics and the physical sciences generally, increasing the scientific return of the SDO mission. This work is a...

2017 Machine Learning Data Set for NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory - Atmospheric Imaging Assembly

David Fouhey, Meng Jin, Mark Cheung, Abndres Munoz-Jaramillo, Richard Galvez, Rajat Thomas, Paul Wright, Alexander Szenicer, Monica G. Bobra, Yang Liu & James Mason
We present a curated dataset from the NASA Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) mission in a format suitable for machine learning research. Beginning from level 1 scientific products we have processed various instrumental corrections, downsampled to manageable spatial and temporal resolutions, and synchronized observations spatially and temporally. We anticipate this curated dataset will facilitate machine learning research in heliophysics and the physical sciences generally, increasing the scientific return of the SDO mission. This work is a...

2018 Machine Learning Data Set for NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory - Atmospheric Imaging Assembly

David Fouhey, Meng Jin, Mark Cheung, Abndres Munoz-Jaramillo, Richard Galvez, Rajat Thomas, Paul Wright, Alexander Szenicer, Monica G. Bobra, Yang Liu & James Mason
We present a curated dataset from the NASA Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) mission in a format suitable for machine learning research. Beginning from level 1 scientific products we have processed various instrumental corrections, downsampled to manageable spatial and temporal resolutions, and synchronized observations spatially and temporally. We anticipate this curated dataset will facilitate machine learning research in heliophysics and the physical sciences generally, increasing the scientific return of the SDO mission. This work is a...

Data from: Genetic diversity, infection prevalence, and possible transmission routes of Bartonella spp. in vampire bats

Daniel J. Becker, Laura M. Bergner, Alexandra B. Bentz, Richard J. Orton, Sonia Altizer & Daniel G. Streicker
Bartonella spp. are globally distributed bacteria that cause endocarditis in humans and domestic animals. Recent work has suggested bats as zoonotic reservoirs of some human Bartonella infections; however, the ecological and spatiotemporal patterns of infection in bats remain largely unknown. Here we studied the genetic diversity, prevalence of infection across seasons and years, individual risk factors, and possible transmission routes of Bartonella in populations of common vampire bats (Desmodus rotundus) in Peru and Belize, for...

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