30 Works

Survey data of scientists on knowledge exchange in critical zone and geoscience

Y. Zheng, L.A Naylor, S. Waldron & D.M. Oliver
Survey data on knowledge exchange experience of both Chinese and British scientists working on critical zone and more broadly on geoscience. Data are drawn from questionnaire surveys to explore the knowledge management methods used in their environmental research. Data are anonymised social survey data from questionnaires. The data were generated during the NERC grant 'The transmissive critical zone: understanding the karst hydrology-biogeochemical interface for sustainable management' reference NE/N007425/1 undertaken as part of the NERC Using...

Literature review of knowledge management across the environment-policy interface in China

Y. Zheng, L.A. Naylor, S. Waldron & D.M. Oliver
Data from literature search systematically conducted using two widely-used academic databases: Web of Science™ (WoS) and Scopus . Data include the annual amount of KM publication in China and across the world, in WoS, the total amount of knowledge management (KM) publication during the searched years for each country (top 20), in Scopus, the total amount of KM publication during the searched years for each country (top 20), information about the retained KM publication for...

Soil protozoa data from Sourhope field experiment site, Scotland [NERC Soil Biodiversity Programme]

B.J. Finlay, H.I.J. Black, S. Brown, K.J. Clarke, G.F. Esteban, R.M. Hindle, J.L. Olmo, A. Rollett, K. Vickerman & S. Buckland
This set of data describes protozoa abundance and diversity in samples taken at the Sourhope experimental site in 1999 and 2000 by the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology and the University of Glasgow. Data were collected during a project funded under the NERC Soil Biodiversity Programme. The NERC Soil Biodiversity Thematic Programme was established in 1999 and was centred upon the intensive study of a large field experiment located at the Macaulay Land Use Research...

Data from: Effects of interspecific coexistence on laying date and clutch size in two closely related species of hole‐nesting birds

Anders Pape Møller, Javier Balbontin, André A. Dhondt, Vladimir Remeš, Frank Adriaensen, Clotilde Biard, Jordi Camprodon, Mariusz Cichoń, Blandine Doligez, Anna Dubiec, Marcel Eens, Tapio Eeva, Anne E. Goodenough, Andrew G. Gosler, Lars Gustafsson, Philipp Heeb, Shelley A. Hinsley, Staffan Jacob, Rimvydas Juškaitis, Toni Laaksonen, Bernard Leclercq, Bruno Massa, Tomasz D. Mazgajski, Rudi G. Nager, Jan-Åke Nilsson … & Ruedi G. Nager
Coexistence between great tits Parus major and blue tits Cyanistes caeruleus, but also other hole‐nesting taxa, constitutes a classic example of species co‐occurrence resulting in potential interference and exploitation competition for food and for breeding and roosting sites. However, the spatial and temporal variations in coexistence and its consequences for competition remain poorly understood. We used an extensive database on reproduction in nest boxes by great and blue tits based on 87 study plots across...

Data from: Can variation in standard metabolic rate explain context-dependent performance of farmed salmon offspring?

Grethe Robertsen, Donald Reid, Sigurd Einum, Tonje Aronsen, Ian A. Fleming, Line E. Sundt-Hansen, Sten Karlsson, Eli Kvingedal, Ola Ugedal & Kjetil Hindar
Escaped farmed Atlantic salmon interbreed with wild Atlantic salmon, leaving offspring that often have lower success in nature than pure wild salmon. On top of this, presence of farmed salmon descendants can impair production of wild type recruits. We hypothesize that both these effects connect with farmed salmon having acquired higher standard metabolic rates (SMR, the energetic cost of self-maintenance) during domestication. Furthermore, fitness related advantages of phenotypic traits associated with both high SMR and...

Data from: Conserved but flexible modularity in the zebrafish skull: implications for craniofacial evolvability

Kevin J. Parsons, Young H. Son, Amelie Crespel, Davide Thambithurai, Shaun Killen, Matthew P. Harris & R. Craig Albertson
Morphological variation is the outward manifestation of development and provides fodder for adaptive evolution. Because of this contingency, evolution is often thought to be biased by developmental processes and functional interactions among structures, which are statistically detectable through forms of covariance among traits. This can take the form of substructures of integrated traits, termed modules, which together comprise patterns of variational modularity. While modularity is essential to an understanding of evolutionary potential, biologists currently have...

Data from: Assessing metabolic constraints on the maximum body size of actinopterygians: locomotion energetics of Leedsichthys problematicus (Actinopterygii, Pachycormiformes)

Humberto G. Ferrón, Borja Holgado, Jeff J. Liston, Carlos Martínez Pérez & Hector Botella
Maximum sizes attained by living actinopterygians are much smaller than those reached by chondrichthyans. Several factors, including the high metabolic requirements of bony fishes, have been proposed as possible body-size constraints but no empirical approaches exist. Remarkably, fossil evidence has rarely been considered despite some extinct actinopterygians reaching sizes comparable to those of the largest living sharks. Here, we have assessed the locomotion energetics of Leedsichthys problematicus, an extinct gigantic suspension-feeder and the largest actinopterygian...

Data from: Resting-state gamma-band power alterations in schizophrenia reveal E/I-balance abnormalities across illness-stages

Tineke Grent-'T-Jong, Joachim Gross, Jozien Goense, Michael Wibral, Ruchika Gajwani, Andrew I. Gumley, Stephen M. Lawrie, Matthias Schwannauer, Frauke Schultze-Lutter, Tobias Navarro Schröder, Dagmar Koethe, F. Markus Leweke, Wolf Singer & Peter J. Uhlhaas
We examined alterations in E/I-balance in schizophrenia (ScZ) through measurements of resting-state gamma-band activity in participants meeting clinical high-risk (CHR) criteria (n = 88), 21 first episode (FEP) patients and 34 chronic ScZ-patients. Furthermore, MRS-data were obtained in CHR-participants and matched controls. Magnetoencephalographic (MEG) resting-state activity was examined at source level and MEG-data were correlated with neuropsychological scores and clinical symptoms. CHR-participants were characterized by increased 64–90 Hz power. In contrast, FEP- and ScZ-patients showed...

Data from: Mesocosm experiments reveal the impact of mosquito control measures on malaria vector life history and population dynamics

Kija Ng’habi, Mafalda Viana, Jason Matthiopoulos, Issa Lyimo, Gerry Killen & Heather M. Feguson
The impact of control measures on mosquito vector fitness and demography is usually estimated from bioassays or indirect variables in the field. Whilst indicative, neither approach is sufficient to quantify the potentially complex response of mosquito populations to combined interventions. Here, large replicated mesocosms were used to measure the population-level response of the malaria vector Anopheles arabiensis to long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLINs) when used in isolation, or combined with insecticidal eave louvers (EL), or treatment...

Data from: Grass competition overwhelms effects of herbivores and precipitation on early tree establishment in Serengeti

Thomas A. Morrison, Ricardo M. Holdo, Deusdedith M. Rugemalila, Mawazo Nzunda & T. Michael Anderson
1. Savanna ecosystems span a diverse range of climates, edaphic conditions and disturbance regimes, the complexity of which has stimulated long-standing interest in the mechanisms that maintain tree-grass coexistence. One hypothesis suggests that tree establishment is strongly limited by one or several demographic bottlenecks at early stages of the tree life cycle. A major impediment to testing this hypothesis is the lack of data on the relative strengths of different bottlenecks across key environmental gradients....

Data from: Moving in the Anthropocene: global reductions in terrestrial mammalian movements

Marlee A. Tucker, Katrin Böhning-Gaese, William F. Fagan, John M. Fryxell, Bram Van Moorter, Susan C. Alberts, Abdullahi H. Ali, Andrew M. Allen, Nina Attias, Tal Avgar, Hattie Bartlam-Brooks, Buuveibaatar Bayarbaatar, Jerrold L. Belant, Alessandra Bertassoni, Dean Beyer, Laura Bidner, Floris M. Van Beest, Stephen Blake, Niels Blaum, Chloe Bracis, Danielle Brown, P. J. Nico De Bruyn, Francesca Cagnacci, Justin M. Calabrese, Constança Camilo-Alves … & Thomas Mueller
Animal movement is fundamental for ecosystem functioning and species survival, yet the effects of the anthropogenic footprint on animal movements have not been estimated across species. Using a unique GPS-tracking database of 803 individuals across 57 species, we found that movements of mammals in areas with a comparatively high human footprint were on average one-half to one-third the extent of their movements in areas with a low human footprint. We attribute this reduction to behavioral...

Data from: Eye region surface temperature reflects both energy reserves and circulating glucocorticoids in a wild bird

Paul Jerem, Susanne Jenni-Eiermann, Katherine Herborn, Dorothy McKeegan, Dominic J. McCafferty & Ruedi G. Nager
Body temperature of endotherms shows substantial within- and between-individual variation, but the sources of this variation are not fully understood in wild animals. Variation in body temperature can indicate how individuals cope with their environment via metabolic or stress-induced effects, both of which may relate to depletion of energy reserves. Body condition can reflect heat production through changes to metabolic rate made to protect energy reserves. Additionally, changes in metabolic processes may be mediated by...

Data from: Resveratrol supplementation reduces oxidative stress and modulates the immune response in free-living animals during a viral infection

Manrico Sebastiano, Marcel Eens, Simone Messina, Hamada Ablelgawad, Kévin Pineau, Gerrit T.S. Beemster, Olivier Chastel, David Costantini, Hamada AbdElgawad & Gerrit T. S. Beemster
1. Diet quality may have an important effect on the regulation of oxidative status and the immune system during an infectious disease. However, the relationship among intake of specific dietary molecules, an individual’s oxidative status and the occurrence and progress of a viral disease remains almost unexplored in free-living organisms. 2. Here, we study a wild, long-lived animal, the Magnificent frigatebird Fregata magnificens to investigate: i) the differences in a number of physiological traits (biomarkers...

Data from: Detection of human disease conditions by single-cell morpho-rheological phenotyping of blood

Nicole Toepfner, Christoph Herold, Oliver Otto, Philipp Rosendahl, Angela Jacobi, Martin Kräter, Julia Stächele, Leonard Menschner, Maik Herbig, Laura Ciuffreda, Lisa Ranford-Cartwright, Michal Grzybek, Ünal Coskun, Elisabeth Reithuber, Genevieve Garriss, Peter Mellroth, Birgitta Henriques Normark, Nicola Tregay, Meinolf Suttorp, Martin Bornhäuser, Edwin R. Chilvers, Reinhard Berner, Jochen Guck, Birgitta Henriques-Normark & Leonhard Menschner
Blood is arguably the most important bodily fluid and its analysis provides crucial health status information. A first routine measure to narrow down diagnosis in clinical practice is the differential blood count, determining the frequency of all major blood cells. What is lacking to advance initial blood diagnostics is an unbiased and quick functional assessment of blood that can narrow down the diagnosis and generate specific hypotheses. To address this need, we introduce the continuous,...

Data from: Plant–insect interactions: double-dating associated insect and plant lineages reveals asynchronous radiations

Diana M. Percy, Roderic D. M. Page, Quentin C. B. Cronk, Quentin C.B. Cronk & Roderic D.M. Page
An increasing number of plant-insect studies using phylogenetic analysis suggest that cospeciation events are rare in plant–insect systems. Instead, nonrandom patterns of phylogenetic congruence are produced by phylogenetically conserved host switching (to related plants) or tracking of particular resources or traits (e.g., chemical). The dominance of host switching in many phytophagous insect groups may make the detection of genuine cospeciation events difficult. One important test of putative cospeciation events is to verify whether reciprocal speciation...

Data from: Glutamate receptor delta2 serum antibodies in paediatric opsoclonus myoclonus ataxia syndrome

Georgina Berridge, David A Menassa, Teresa Moloney, Patrick J Waters, Imogen Welding, Selina Thomsen, Sameer Zuberi, Roman Fischer, A. Radu Aricescu, Michael Pike, Russell C Dale, Benedikt Kessler, Angela Vincent, Ming Lim, Sarosh R Irani & Bethan Lang
Objective: To identify neuronal surface antibodies in opsoclonus myoclonus ataxia syndrome (OMAS) usingcontemporary antigen discovery methodology. Methods: OMAS patient serum IgG immunohistochemistry using age-equivalent rat cerebellar tissue was followed by immunoprecipitation, gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Data are available via ProteomeXchange (identifier PXD009578). This generated a list of potential neuronal surface cerebellar autoantigens. Live cell-based assays (CBA) were used to confirm membrane-surface antigens and adsorb antigen-specific IgGs. The serological results were compared to the clinical...

Data from: “Green incubation”: avian offspring benefit from aromatic nest herbs through improved parental incubation behaviour

Helga Gwinner, Pablo Capilla-Lasheras, Caren Cooper & Barbara Helm
Development of avian embryos requires thermal energy, usually from parents. Parents may however trades off catering for embryonic requirements against their own need to forage through intermittent incubation. This dynamically adjusted behaviour can be affected by properties of the nest. Here we experimentally show a novel mechanism by which parents, through incorporation of aromatic herbs into nests, effectively modify their incubation behaviour to the benefit of their offspring. Our study species, the European starling, includes...

Data from: The population and landscape genetics of the European badger (Meles meles) in Ireland.

Jimena Guerrero, Andrew W. Byrne, John Lavery, Eleanor Breadon, Gavin Kelly, Emily A. Courcier, James O'Keefe, Ursula Fogarty, Denise B. O'Meara, Dennis Ensing, Carl McCormick, Roman Biek, Robin A. Skuce, Adrian R. Allen & James O'Keeffe
The population genetic structure of free-ranging species is expected to reflect landscape-level effects. Quantifying the role of these factors and their relative contribution often has important implications for wildlife management. The population genetics of the European badger (Meles meles) have received considerable attention, not least because the species acts as a potential wildlife reservoir for bovine tuberculosis (bTB) in Britain and Ireland. Herein, we detail the most comprehensive population and landscape genetic study of the...

Data from: Alternative reproductive tactics and lifetime reproductive success in a polygynandrous mammal

Adele Balmer, Bertram Zinner, Jamieson C. Gorrell, David W. Coltman, Shirley Raveh & F. Stephen Dobson
The widespread occurrence of alternative reproductive tactics (ARTs) highlights the diverse ways in which sexual selection can operate within a population. We studied ARTs in Columbian ground squirrels (Urocitellus columbianus), evaluating paternity, lifetime reproductive success, and life histories. Reproductively mature male Columbian ground squirrels displayed either a territorial or satellite (non-territorial) tactic. Territorial males secured a higher proportion of copulations, were more likely to mate at earlier positions in females’ mating sequences and sired more...

Data from: Decreased mitochondrial metabolic requirements in fasting animals carry an oxidative cost

Karine Salin, Eugenia M. Villasevil, Graeme J. Anderson, Sonya K. Auer, Colin Selman, Richard C. Hartley, William Mullen, Christos Chinopoulos & Neil B. Metcalfe
1. Many animals experience periods of food shortage in their natural environment. It has been hypothesised that the metabolic responses of animals to naturally-occurring periods of food deprivation may have long-term negative impacts on their subsequent life-history. 2. In particular, reductions in energy requirements in response to fasting may help preserve limited resources but potentially come at a cost of increased oxidative stress. However, little is known about this trade-off since studies of energy metabolism...

Data from: Rapid and dynamic alternative splicing impacts the Arabidopsis cold response transcriptome

Cristiane P. G. Calixto, Wenbin Guo, Allan B. James, Nikoleta A. Tzioutziou, Juan C. Entizne, Paige E. Panter, Heather Knight, Hugh Nimmo, Runxuan Zhang & John W. S. Brown
Plants have adapted to tolerate and survive constantly changing environmental conditions by re-programming gene expression. The dynamics of the contribution of alternative splicing (AS) to stress responses are unknown. RNA-sequencing of a time-series of Arabidopsis thaliana plants exposed to cold determines the timing of significant AS changes. This shows a massive and rapid AS response with coincident waves of transcriptional and AS activity occurring in the first few hours of temperature reduction, and further AS...

Data from: Perceptually relevant speech tracking in auditory and motor cortex reflects distinct linguistic features

Anne Keitel, Joachim Gross & Christoph Kayser
During online speech processing, our brain tracks the acoustic fluctuations in speech at different timescales. Previous research has focused on generic timescales (for example, delta or theta bands) that are assumed to map onto linguistic features such as prosody or syllables. However, given the high intersubject variability in speaking patterns, such a generic association between the timescales of brain activity and speech properties can be ambiguous. Here, we analyse speech tracking in source-localised magnetoencephalographic data...

Data from: Genetic diversity, infection prevalence, and possible transmission routes of Bartonella spp. in vampire bats

Daniel J. Becker, Laura M. Bergner, Alexandra B. Bentz, Richard J. Orton, Sonia Altizer & Daniel G. Streicker
Bartonella spp. are globally distributed bacteria that cause endocarditis in humans and domestic animals. Recent work has suggested bats as zoonotic reservoirs of some human Bartonella infections; however, the ecological and spatiotemporal patterns of infection in bats remain largely unknown. Here we studied the genetic diversity, prevalence of infection across seasons and years, individual risk factors, and possible transmission routes of Bartonella in populations of common vampire bats (Desmodus rotundus) in Peru and Belize, for...

Data from: Local weather and body condition influence habitat use and movements on land of molting female southern elephant seals (Mirounga leonina)

Laureline L. Chaise, Iris Prinet, Camille Toscani, Susan L. Gallon, William Paterson, Dominic J. McCafferty, Marc Théry, André Ancel & Caroline Gilbert
Southern elephant seals (Mirounga leonina) are known to move and aggregate while moulting, but little is known about their behaviour on land during this time. In this study, 60 adult females were monitored (23 with GPS tags) during four moulting seasons, between 2012 and 2016 at Kerguelen Archipelago, Indian Ocean. Population surveys were recorded each year (N = 230 daily counts) and habitat use was analysed in relation to the stage of the moult and...

Data from: Plasmodium vivax-like genome sequences shed new insights into Plasmodium vivax biology and evolution

Aude Gilabert, Thomas D. Otto, Gavin G. Rutledge, Blaise Franzon, Benjamin Ollomo, Céline Arnathau, Patrick Durand, Nancy D. Moukodoum, Alain-Prince Okouga, Barthélémy Ngoubangoye, Boris Makanga, Larson Boundenga, Christophe Paupy, François Renaud, Franck Prugnolle & Virginie Rougeron
Although Plasmodium vivax is responsible for the majority of malaria infections outside Africa, little is known about its evolution and pathway to humans. Its closest genetic relative, Plasmodium vivax-like, was discovered in African great apes and is hypothesized to have given rise to P. vivax in humans. To unravel the evolutionary history and adaptation of P. vivax to different host environments, we generated using long and short read sequence technologies two new P. vivax-like reference...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    30

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    30

Affiliations

  • University of Glasgow
    30
  • French National Centre for Scientific Research
    4
  • University of Antwerp
    2
  • University of Münster
    2
  • University of Georgia
    2
  • University of Alberta
    2
  • University of British Columbia
    2
  • University of Stirling
    2
  • University of Bristol
    2
  • Max Planck Institute for Ornithology
    1