64 Works

Image-based automated species identification: Can virtual data augmentation overcome problems of insufficient sampling?

Morris Klasen, Jonas Eberle, Dirk Ahrens & Volker Steinhage
Automated species identification and delimitation is challenging, particularly in rare and thus often scarcely sampled species, which do not allow sufficient discrimination of infraspecific versus interspecific variation. Typical problems arising from either low or exaggerated interspecific morphological differentiation are best met by automated methods of machine learning that learn efficient and effective species identification from training samples. However, limited infraspecific sampling remains a key challenge also in machine learning. In this study, we assessed whether...

Sexual dimorphism in an adaptive radiation: Does intersexual niche differentiation result in ecological character displacement?

Benjamin D. Wasiljew, Jobst Pfaender, Benjamin Wipfler, Mariam Gabelaia, Ilham Vermandra Utama, Letha Louisiana Wantania & Fabian Herder
Evolutionary radiations are one plausible explanation for the rich biodiversity on Earth. Adaptive radiations are the most studied form of evolutionary radiations and ecological opportunity has been identified as one factor permitting them. Competition among individuals is supposedly highest in populations of conspecifics. Divergent modes of resource use might minimize trophic overlap, and thus intersexual competition, resulting in ecological character displacement between sexes. However, the role of intersexual differentiation in speciation processes is insufficiently studied....

Combining molecular data sets with strongly heterogeneous taxon coverage enlightens the peculiar biogeographic history of stoneflies (Insecta: Plecoptera)

Harald Letsch, Sabrina Simon, Paul Frandsen, Shanlin Liu, Ryuichiro Machida, Christoph Mayer, Bernhard Misof, Oliver Niehuis, Xin Zhou & Benjamin Wipfler
Extant members of the ancient insect order of stoneflies exhibit a disjunct, antitropical distribution, with one major lineage exclusively occurring in the Southern Hemisphere and the other, with few exceptions, on the Northern continents. Here, we address the biogeographic distribution and phylogenetic relationships of stoneflies using a phylogenetic workflow that combines both transcriptomic and Sanger sequence datasets with heterogeneous taxon coverage. We used a dataset comprising 2997 genes derived from the transcriptomes of 30 species...

Identification of scavenger receptors and thrombospondin type 1 repeat proteins potentially relevant for plastid recognition in Sacoglossa

Jenny Melo Clavijo, Silja Frankenbach, Cátia Fidalgo, Joao Serôdio, Alexander Donath, Angelika Preisfeld & Gregor Christa
Functional kleptoplasty is a photosymbiotic relationship, in which photosynthetically active chloroplasts serve as an intracellular symbiont for a heterotrophic host. Among Metazoa, functional kleptoplasty is only found in marine sea slugs belonging to the Sacoglossa and recently described in rhabdocoel worms. Although functional kleptoplasty has been intensively studied in Sacoglossa, the fundamentals of the specific recognition of the chloroplasts and their subsequent incorporation are unknown. The key to ensure the initiation of any symbiosis is...

The roles of wing color pattern and geography in the evolution of Neotropical Preponini butterflies

Elena Ortiz-Acevedo, Juan P. Gomez, Marianne Espeland, Emmanuel Toussaint & Keith R. Willmott
Diversification rates and evolutionary trajectories are known to be influenced by phenotypic traits and the geographic history of the landscapes that organisms inhabit. One of the most conspicuous traits in butterflies is their wing color pattern, which has been shown to be important in speciation. The evolution of many taxa in the Neotropics has also been influenced by major geological events. Using a dated, species-level molecular phylogenetic hypothesis for Preponini, a colorful Neotropical butterfly tribe,...

Phylogenomic analysis sheds light on the evolutionary pathways towards acoustic communication in Orthoptera

Hojun Song, Olivier Béthoux, Seunggwan Shin, Alexander Donath, Harald Letsch, Shanlin Liu, Duane D. McKenna, Guanliang Meng, Bernhard Misof, Lars Podsiadlowski, Xin Zhou, Benjamin Wipfler & Sabrina Simon
Acoustic communication is enabled by the evolution of specialised hearing and sound producing organs. In this study, we performed a large-scale macroevolutionary study to understand how both hearing and sound production evolved and affected diversification in the insect order Orthoptera, which includes many familiar singing insects, such as crickets, katydids, and grasshoppers. Using phylogenomic data, we firmly establish phylogenetic relationships among the major lineages and divergence time estimates within Orthoptera, as well as the lineage-specific...

Data from: Structural mouthpart interaction evolved already in the earliest lineages of insects

Alexander Blanke, Peter T. Rühr, Rajmund Mokso, Pablo Villanueva, Fabian Wilde, Marco Stampanoni, Kentaro Uesugi, Ryuichiro Machida & Bernhard Misof
In butterflies, bees, flies and true bugs specific mouthparts are in close contact or even fused to enable piercing, sucking or sponging of particular food sources. The common phenomenon behind these mouthpart types is a complex composed of several consecutive mouthparts which structurally interact during food uptake. The single mouthparts are thus only functional in conjunction with other adjacent mouthparts, which is fundamentally different to biting–chewing. It is, however, unclear when structural mouthpart interaction (SMI)...

Data from: An integrative phylogenomic approach illuminates the evolutionary history of cockroaches and termites (Blattodea)

Dominic A. Evangelista, Benjamin Wipfler, Olivier Béthoux, Alexander Donath, Mari Fujita, Manpreet K. Kohli, Frédéric Legendre, Shanlin Liu, Ryuichiro Machida, Berhard Misof, Ralph Peters, Lars Podsiadlowski, Jes Rust, Kai Schuette, Ward Tollenaar, Jessica L. Ware, Torsten Wappler, Xin Zhou, Karen Meusemann & Sabrina Simon
READMEREADME of Supplementary Archives and included files of Evangelista et al. 2019Evangelista_et_al_README_DRYAD.pdfSupplementary Archive 1Files included in Supplementary Archive 1, see Evangelista_et_al_README_DRYAD.pdfSupplementary_Archive_1.zipSupplementary Archive 2Files included in Supplementary Archive 2, see Evangelista_et_al_README_DRYAD.pdfSupplementary_Archive_2.zip

Data from: Influence of device accuracy and choice of algorithm for species distribution modelling of seabirds: a case study using black-browed albatrosses

Petra Quillfeldt, Jan O. Engler, Janet R. D. Silk, Richard A. Phillips & Janet R.D. Silk
Species distribution models (SDM) based on tracking data from different devices are used increasingly to explain and predict seabird distributions. However, different tracking methods provide different data resolutions, ranging from < 10m to >100km. To better understand the implications of this variation, we modeled the potential distribution of black-browed albatrosses Thalassarche melanophris from South Georgia that were simultaneously equipped with a Platform Terminal Transmitter (PTT) (high resolution) and a Global Location Sensor (GLS) logger (coarse...

Data from: Comparative morphology and evolution of the cnidosac in Cladobranchia (Gastropoda: Heterobranchia: Nudibranchia)

Jessica A. Goodheart, Sabrina Bleidißel, Dorothee Schillo, Ellen E. Strong, Daniel L. Ayres, Angelika Preisfeld, Allen G. Collins, Michael P. Cummings & Heike Wägele
Background: A number of shelled and shell-less gastropods are known to use multiple defensive mechanisms, including internally generated or externally obtained biochemically active compounds and structures. Within Nudipleura, nudibranchs within Cladobranchia possess such a special defense: the ability to sequester cnidarian nematocysts – small capsules that can inject venom into the tissues of other organisms. This ability is distributed across roughly 600 species within Cladobranchia, and many questions still remain in regard to the comparative...

Data from: Plio-Pleistocene phylogeography of the Southeast Asian Blue Panchax killifish, Aplocheilus panchax

Samantha V. Beck, Gary R. Carvalho, Axel Barlow, Lukas Rüber, Heok Hui Tan, Estu Nugroho, Daisy Wowor, Siti Azizah Mohd Nor, Fabian Herder, Zainal A. Muchlisin & Mark De Bruyn
The complex climatic and geological history of Southeast Asia has shaped this region’s high biodiversity. In particular, sea level fluctuations associated with repeated glacial cycles during the Pleistocene both facilitated, and limited, connectivity between populations. In this study, we used data from two mitochondrial and three anonymous nuclear markers to determine whether a fresh/brackish water killifish, Aplocheilus panchax, Hamilton, 1822, could be used to further understand how climatic oscillations and associated sea level fluctuations have...

Data from: Oligonucleotide primers for targeted amplification of single-copy nuclear genes in apocritan Hymenoptera

Gerrit Hartig, Ralph S. Peters, Janus Borner, Claudia Etzbauer, Bernhard Misof & Oliver Niehuis
BACKGROUND: Published nucleotide sequence data from the mega-diverse insect order Hymenoptera (sawflies, bees, wasps, and ants) are taxonomically scattered and still inadequate for reconstructing a well-supported phylogenetic tree for the order. The analysis of comprehensive multiple gene data sets obtained via targeted PCR could provide a cost-effective solution to this problem. However, oligonucleotide primers for PCR amplification of nuclear genes across a wide range of hymenopteran species are still scarce. FINDINGS: Here we present a...

Data from: Striking cuticular hydrocarbon dimorphism in the mason wasp Odynerus spinipes and its possible evolutionary cause (Hymenoptera: Chrysididae, Vespidae)

Mareike Wurdack, Sina Herbertz, Daniel Dowling, Johannes Kroiss, Erhard Strohm, Hannes Baur, Oliver Niehuis & Thomas Schmitt
Cleptoparasitic wasps and bees smuggle their eggs into the nest of a host organism. Here the larvae of the cleptoparasite feed upon the food provision intended for the offspring of the host. As cleptoparasitism incurs a loss of fitness for the host organism (offspring of the host fail to develop), hosts of cleptoparasites are expected to exploit cues that alert them to potential cleptoparasite infestation. Cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs) could serve as such cues, as insects...

Data from: Exploiting gene families for phylogenomic analysis of myzostomid transcriptome data

Stefanie Hartmann, Conrad Helm, Birgit Nickel, Matthias Meyer, Torsten H. Struck, Ralph Tiedemann, Joachim Selbig & Christoph Bleidorn
BACKGROUND: In trying to understand the evolutionary relationships of organisms, the current flood of sequence data offers great opportunities, but also reveals new challenges with regard to data quality, the selection of data for subsequent analysis, and the automation of steps that were once done manually for single-gene analyses. Even though genome or transcriptome data is available for representatives of most bilaterian phyla, some enigmatic taxa still have an uncertain position in the animal tree...

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