4 Works

Data from: Eco-genomic analysis of the poleward range expansion of the wasp spider Argiope bruennichi shows rapid adaptation and genomic admixture

Henrik Krehenwinkel, Dennis Rödder & Diethard Tautz
Poleward range expansions are commonly attributed to global change, but could alternatively be driven by rapid evolutionary adaptation. A well-documented example of a range expansion during the past decades is provided by the European wasp spider Argiope bruennichi. Using ecological niche modeling, thermal tolerance experiments and a genome-wide analysis of gene expression divergence, we show that invasive populations have adapted to novel climatic conditions in the course of their expansion. Their climatic niche shift is...

Data from: Mitochondrial capture enriches mito-DNA 100 folds enabling PCR-free mitogenomics biodiversity analysis

Shanlin Liu, Xin Wang, Lin Xie, Meihua Tan, Zhenyu Li, Xu Su, Hao Zhang, Bernhard Misof, Karl M. Kjer, Min Tang, Oliver Niehuis, Hui Jiang & Xin Zhou
Biodiversity analyses based on Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) platforms have developed by leaps and bounds in recent years. A PCR-free strategy, which can alleviate taxonomic bias, was considered as a promising approach to delivering reliable species compositions of targeted environments. The major impediment of such a method is the lack of appropriate mitochondrial DNA enrichment ways. Because mitochondrial genomes (mitogenomes) make up only a small proportion of total DNA, PCR-free methods will inevitably result in...

Data from: Structural mouthpart interaction evolved already in the earliest lineages of insects

Alexander Blanke, Peter T. Rühr, Rajmund Mokso, Pablo Villanueva, Fabian Wilde, Marco Stampanoni, Kentaro Uesugi, Ryuichiro Machida & Bernhard Misof
In butterflies, bees, flies and true bugs specific mouthparts are in close contact or even fused to enable piercing, sucking or sponging of particular food sources. The common phenomenon behind these mouthpart types is a complex composed of several consecutive mouthparts which structurally interact during food uptake. The single mouthparts are thus only functional in conjunction with other adjacent mouthparts, which is fundamentally different to biting–chewing. It is, however, unclear when structural mouthpart interaction (SMI)...

Data from: Striking cuticular hydrocarbon dimorphism in the mason wasp Odynerus spinipes and its possible evolutionary cause (Hymenoptera: Chrysididae, Vespidae)

Mareike Wurdack, Sina Herbertz, Daniel Dowling, Johannes Kroiss, Erhard Strohm, Hannes Baur, Oliver Niehuis & Thomas Schmitt
Cleptoparasitic wasps and bees smuggle their eggs into the nest of a host organism. Here the larvae of the cleptoparasite feed upon the food provision intended for the offspring of the host. As cleptoparasitism incurs a loss of fitness for the host organism (offspring of the host fail to develop), hosts of cleptoparasites are expected to exploit cues that alert them to potential cleptoparasite infestation. Cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs) could serve as such cues, as insects...

Registration Year

  • 2015
    4

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    4

Affiliations

  • Zoological Research Museum Alexander Koenig
    4
  • Guizhou Center for Disease Control and Prevention
    1
  • University of California, Berkeley
    1
  • University of Regensburg
    1
  • Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute
    1
  • University of Freiburg
    1
  • University of Tsukuba
    1
  • University of Copenhagen
    1
  • Paul Scherrer Institute
    1
  • Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht Centre for Materials and Coastal Research
    1