362 Works

Assessing the impact of diffusion model on the turbulent transport and flame structure of premixed lean hydrogen flames: hydrogen data

Aaron Fillo, PETER HAMLINGTON & Kyle Niemeyer
This dataset contains results from direct numerical simulations of premixed, three-dimensional, turbulent hydrogen/air flames, using the multicomponent and mixture-averaged diffusion models. In particular, this dataset contains information about the enstrophy budget and flame structure. We performed the simulations using the finite-difference code NGA; simulation details are described completely in the associated article.

Bean CAP Snap Bean Diversity Panel Passport Data

James R. Myers
The accessions used to create the Snap Bean Diversity Panel were 149 snap bean cultivars and germplasm lines selected from North American and European germplasm. This panel was developed with support from the Common Bean Coordinated Agriculture Project (USDA-NIFA grant no. 2009-85606-05964). The accompanying data set contains information, where known, about pod traits and plant growth habit, USDA-NPGS Plant Introduction (PI) number, who bred the cultivar, market class and pod sieve size, plant variety protection...

Stream metabolism and suspended sediment concentration data from two streams in the Oregon Coast Range

Catalina Segura, Samantha Cargill & Dana Warren

Land-use in the Willamette Valley from 2004-2017

Bogdan Strimbu, George Mueller-Warrant & Kristin Trippe
The Willamette Valley, bounded on the west by the Coast Range and on the east by the Cascade Mountains, is the largest river valley completely confined to Oregon. The fertile valley soils combined with a temperate, marine climate create ideal agronomic conditions for seed production. Historically, seed cropping systems in the Willamette Valley have focused on the production of grass and forage seeds. In addition to growing over two-thirds of the nation’s cool-season grass seed,...

A program for finding some reduced spherical pictures

Matthias C. Merzenich

Modeling of an Urban Radiocesium Pathway from Catchment to Wastewater Treatment Sludge - Dataset

George MH NG
This archive is a compilation of SWMM input files and STELLA models, augmented by R scripts to perform various processing for sensitivity analysis, data import / export, plot generation and computation of various summary outputs. Part I is the sensitivity analysis of a SWMM model representative of the case study in Urso et al (2013). An extended Fourier Amplitude Sensitivity Testing (eFAST) work flow for this SWMM model is implemented in R script. Part II...

Hyperspectral reflectance data of wheat in situ and lab scans infected with soilborne wheat mosaic virus

Marja Haagsma, Christina Hagerty, Duncan Kroese & Elizabeth Jachens
Hyperspectral images were taken in a lab setting from wheat leaves and in situ from agricultural wheat fields and disease nursery. The goal of this research was to find infection of soilborne wheat mosaic virus in wheat for early detection using digital imagery, i.e., either hyperspectral or multispectral.

Abu Dhabi Blue Carbon project

Lisa Schile, J. Boone Kauffman, J. Patrick Megonigal, James Fourqurean & Stephen Crooks
Coastal ecosystems produce and sequester significant amounts of carbon (‘blue carbon’), which has been well documented in humid and semi-humid regions of temperate and tropical climates but less so in arid regions where mangroves, marshes, and seagrasses exist near the limit of their tolerance for extreme temperature and salinity. To better understand these unique systems, we measured whole-ecosystem carbon stocks (above- and belowground biomass and soil) in 58 sites across the United Arab Emirates in...

Ocean acidification stress index for shellfish (OASIS): Linking Pacific oyster larval survival and exposure to variable carbonate chemistry regimes

Iria Gimenez Calvo, George Waldbusser & Burke Hales
Understanding larval bivalve responses to variable regimes of seawater carbonate chemistry requires realistic quantification of physiological stress. Based on a degree-day modeling approach, we developed a new metric, the ocean acidification stress index for shellfish (OASIS), for this purpose. OASIS integrates over the entire larval period the instantaneous stress associated with deviations from published sensitivity thresholds to aragonite saturation state (ΩAr) while experiencing variable carbonate chemistry. We measured survival to D-hinge and pre-settlement stage of...

Data from: Larval development in the Pacific oyster and the impacts of ocean acidification: differential genetic effects in wild and domesticated stocks

Evan Durland, Pierre De Wit, Eli Meyer & Chris Langdon
The adaptive capacity of marine calcifiers to ocean acidification (OA) is a topic of great interest to evolutionary biologists and ecologists. Previous studies have provided evidence to suggest that larval resilience to high pCO­2 seawater for these species is a trait with a genetic basis and variability in natural populations. To date, however, it remains unclear how the selective effects of OA occur within the context of complex genetic interactions underpinning larval development in many...

Persistence of an endangered native duck, feral mallards, and multiple hybrid swarms across the main Hawaiian Islands

Caitlin Wells, Philip Lavretsky, Michael Sorenson, Jeffrey Peters, Jeffrey DaCosta, Stephen Turnbull, Kimberly Uyehara, Christopher Malachowski, Bruce Dugger, John Eadie & Andrew Engilis
Interspecific hybridization is recognized as an important process in the evolutionary dynamics of both speciation and the reversal of speciation. However, our understanding of the spatial and temporal patterns of hybridization that erode versus promote species boundaries is incomplete. The endangered, endemic koloa maoli (or Hawaiian duck, Anas wyvilliana) is thought to be threatened with genetic extinction through ongoing hybridization with an introduced congener, the feral mallard (A. platyrhynchos). We investigated spatial and temporal variation...

Data from: Passive acoustic monitoring effectively detects Northern Spotted Owls and Barred Owls over a range of forest conditions

Leila S. Duchac, Damon B. Lesmeister, Katie M. Dugger, Zachary J. Ruff & Raymond J. Davis
Passive acoustic monitoring using autonomous recording units (ARUs) is a fast-growing area of wildlife research especially for rare, cryptic species that vocalize. Northern Spotted Owl (Strix occidentalis caurina) populations have been monitored since the mid-1980s using mark-recapture methods. To evaluate an alternative survey method, we used ARUs to detect calls of Northern Spotted Owls and Barred Owls (S. varia), a congener that has expanded its range into the Pacific Northwest and threatens Northern Spotted Owl...

Data from: Spatial and temporal patterns of larval dispersal in a coral-reef fish metapopulation: evidence of variable reproductive success

Timothy J. Pusack, Mark R. Christie, Darren W. Johnson, Christopher D. Stallings & Mark A. Hixon
Many marine organisms can be transported hundreds of kilometers during their pelagic larval stage, yet little is known about spatial and temporal patterns of larval dispersal. Although traditional population-genetic tools can be applied to infer movement of larvae on an evolutionary time scale, large effective population sizes and high rates of gene-flow present serious challenges to documenting dispersal patterns over shorter, ecologically-relevant, time scales. Here, we address these challenges by combining direct parentage analysis and...

Data from: Shrub encroachment is linked to extirpation of an apex predator

Christopher E. Gordon, David J. Eldridge, William J. Ripple, Mathew S. Crowther, Ben D. Moore & Mike Letnic
The abundance of shrubs has increased throughout Earth's arid lands. This ‘shrub encroachment’ has been linked to livestock grazing, fire-suppression and elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations facilitating shrub recruitment. Apex predators initiate trophic cascades which can influence the abundance of many species across multiple trophic levels within ecosystems. Extirpation of apex predators is linked inextricably to pastoralism, but has not been considered as a factor contributing to shrub encroachment. Here, we ask if trophic cascades triggered...

Data from: Genetic variation in adaptive traits and seed transfer zones for Pseudoroegneria spicata (bluebunch wheatgrass) in the northwestern United States

John Bradley St. Clair, Francis F. Kilkenny, Richard C. Johnson, Nancy L. Shaw & George Weaver
A genecological approach was used to explore genetic variation in adaptive traits in Pseudoroegneria spicata, a key restoration grass, in the intermountain western United States. Common garden experiments were established at three contrasting sites with seedlings from two maternal parents from each of 114 populations along with five commercial releases commonly used in restoration. Traits associated with size, flowering phenology and leaf width varied considerably among populations and were moderately correlated to the climates of...

Data from: Fungi ahoy! Diversity on marine wooden substrata in the high North

Teppo Rämä, Jenni Nordén, Marie L. Davey, Geir H. Mathiassen, Joseph W. Spatafora & Håvard Kauserud
Marine fungi are severely understudied in the polar regions. We used molecularly identified cultures to study fungi inhabiting 50 intertidal and sea-floor logs along the North Norwegian coast. The aim was to explore the taxonomic and ecological diversity and to examine factors shaping the marine wood-inhabiting fungal communities. The 577 pure cultures analyzed clustered into 147 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) based on 97 % ITS sequence similarity. Ascomycota dominated, but OTUs belonging to Basidiomycota, Mucoromycotina...

Data from: Optimal nutrient exchange and immune responses operate in partner specificity in the cnidarian-dinoflagellate symbiosis

Jennifer L. Matthews, Camerron M. Crowder, Clinton A. Oakley, Adrian Lutz, Ute Roessner, Eli Meyer, Arthur R. Grossman, Virginia M. Weis & Simon K. Davy
The relationship between reef-building corals and phototrophic dinoflagellates of the genus Symbiodinium is fundamental to the functioning of coral reef ecosystems. It has been suggested that reef corals may adapt to climate change by changing their dominant symbiont type to a more thermally tolerant one, although the capacity for such a community shift is potentially hindered by the compatibility of different host-symbiont pairings. Here we combined transcriptomic and metabolomic analyses to characterize the molecular, cellular,...

Data from: Eyespots deflect predator attack increasing fitness and promoting the evolution of phenotypic plasticity

Kathleen L. Prudic, Andrew M. Stoehr, Bethany R. Wasik & Antónia Monteiro
Some eyespots are thought to deflect attack away from the vulnerable body, yet there is limited empirical evidence for this function and its adaptive advantage. Here, we demonstrate the conspicuous ventral hindwing eyespots found on Bicyclus anynana butterflies protect against invertebrate predators, specifically praying mantids. Wet season (WS) butterflies with larger, brighter eyespots were easier for mantids to detect, but more difficult to capture compared to dry season (DS) butterflies with small, dull eyespots. Mantids...

Data from: Primary rainforest amount at the landscape scale mitigates bird biodiversity loss and biotic homogenization

Urs G. Kormann, Adam S. Hadley, Teja Tscharntke, Matthew G. Betts, W. Douglas Robinson & Christoph Scherber
1.Tropical conservation strategies traditionally focus on large tracts of pristine forests, but given rapid primary forest decline, understanding the role of secondary forest remnants for biodiversity maintenance is critical. Until now, the interactive effects of changes in forest amount, configuration and disturbance history (secondary vs. primary forest) on the conservation value of tropical landscapes has remained unknown, hampering the incorporation of these global change drivers into local and global conservation planning. 2.We disentangled effects of...

Data from: Herbicides and herbivory interact to drive plant community and crop-tree establishment

Thomas D. Stokely, Jake Verschuyl, Joan C. Hagar & Matthew G. Betts
Land management practices often directly alter vegetation structure and composition, but the degree to which ecological processes such as herbivory interact with management to influence biodiversity is less well understood. We hypothesized that large herbivores compound the effects of intensive forest management on early-seral plant communities and plantation establishment (i.e., tree survival and growth), and the degree of such effects is dependent on the intensity of management practices. We established 225 m2 wild ungulate (deer...

Data from: Towards a predictive model of species interaction beta diversity

Catherine H. Graham, Benjamin G. Weinstein & Ben G. Weinstein
Species interactions are fundamental to community dynamics and ecosystem processes. Despite significant progress in describing species interactions, we lack the ability to predict changes in interactions across space and time. We outline a Bayesian approach to separate the probability of species co‐occurrence, interaction and detectability in influencing interaction betadiversity. We use a multi‐year hummingbird–plant time series, divided into training and testing data, to show that including models of detectability and occurrence improves forecasts of mutualistic...

Data from: Bioclimatic, ecological, and phenotypic intermediacy and high genetic admixture in a natural hybrid of octoploid strawberries

Isabella Salamone, Rajanikanth Govindarajulu, Stacey Falk, Matthew Parks, Aaron Liston & Tia-Lynn Ashman
PREMISE OF THE STUDY: Hybrid zones provide ‘natural laboratories’ for understanding the processes of selection, reinforcement and speciation. We sought to gain insight into the degree of introgression and the extent of ecological/phenotypic intermediacy in the natural hybrid strawberry, Fragaria × ananassa subsp. cuneifolia. METHODS: We used whole plastome sequencing to identify parental species-specific (Fragaria chiloensis and F. virginiana) chloroplast SNPs, and combined the use of these with nuclear microsatellite markers to genetically characterize the...

Data from: Within-species patterns challenge our understanding of the Leaf Economics Spectrum

Leander D.L. Anderegg, Logan T. Berner, Grayson Badgley, Meera L. Sethi, Beverly E. Law, Janneke HilleRisLambers & Leander D. L. Anderegg
The utility of plant functional traits for predictive ecology relies on our ability to interpret trait variation across multiple taxonomic and ecological scales. Using extensive datasets of trait variation within species, across species, and across communities, we analyzed whether and at what scales ‘leaf economics spectrum’ (LES) traits show predicted trait-trait covariation. We found that most variation in LES traits is often, but not universally, at high taxonomic levels (between families, between genera in a...

Data from: Assessing changes in functional connectivity in a desert bighorn sheep metapopulation after two generations

Clinton W. Epps, Rachel S. Crowhurst & Brandon S. Nickerson
Determining how species move across complex and fragmented landscapes and interact with human-made barriers is a major research focus in conservation. Studies estimating functional connectivity from movement, dispersal, or gene flow usually rely on a single study period, and rarely consider variation over time. We contrasted genetic structure and gene flow across barriers for a metapopulation of desert bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis nelsoni) using genotypes collected 2000–2003 and 2013–2015. Based on the recently observed but...

Data from: Intraspecific variability and reaction norms of forest understory plant species traits

Julia I. Burton, Steven S. Perakis, Sean C. McKenzie, Caitlin E. Lawrence & Klaus J. Puettmann
1.Trait-based models of ecological communities typically assume intraspecific variation in functional traits is not important, though such variation can change species trait rankings along gradients in resources and environmental conditions, and thus influence community structure and function. 2. We examined the degree of intraspecific relative to interspecific variation, and reaction norms of 11 functional traits for 57 forest understory plant species, including: intrinsic water-use efficiency (iWUE), Δ15N, 5 leaf traits, 2 stem traits and 2...

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