12 Works

Data from: Comparative analyses of effective population size within and among species: ranid frogs as a case study

Ivan C Phillipsen, W. Chris Funk, Eric A. Hoffman, Kirsten J. Monsen & Michael S. Blouin
It has recently become practicable to estimate the effective sizes (Ne) of multiple populations within species. Such efforts are valuable for estimating Ne in evolutionary modeling and conservation planning. We used microsatellite loci to estimate Ne of 90 populations of four ranid frogs (20 to 26 populations per species, mean n per population = 29). Our objectives were to determine typical values of Ne for populations of each species, compare Ne estimates among the species,...

Data from: Hybridization and barriers to gene flow in an island bird radiation

Ben H. Warren, Eldredge Bermingham, Yann Bourgeois, Laura K. Estep, Robert P. Prys-Jones, Dominique Strasberg & Christophe Thébaud
While reinforcement may play a role in all major modes of speciation, relatively little is known about the timescale over which species hybridize without evolving complete reproductive isolation. Birds have high potential for hybridization, and islands provide simple settings for uncovering speciation and hybridization patterns. Here we develop a phylogenetic hypothesis for a phenotypically-diverse radiation of finch-like weaver-birds (Foudia) endemic to the western Indian Ocean islands. We find that unlike Darwin’s finches, each island-endemic Foudia...

Data from: The million-year wait for macroevolutionary bursts

Josef C Uyeda, Thomas F Hansen, Stevan J Arnold & Jason Pienaar
We lack a comprehensive understanding of evolutionary pattern and process because short-term and long-term data have rarely been combined into a single analytical framework. Here we test alternative models of phenotypic evolution using a dataset of unprecedented size and temporal span (nearly 8,000 data points). The data are body-size measurements taken from historical studies, the fossil record, and among-species comparative data representing mammals, squamates, and birds. By analyzing this unusually large dataset, we identify stochastic...

Data from: More than meets the eye: detecting cryptic microgeographic population structure in a parasite with a complex life cycle

Charles D Criscione, Román Vilas, Esperanza Paniagua & Michael S Blouin
Nonrandom recruitment of parasites among hosts can lead to genetic differentiation among hosts and mating dynamics that promote inbreeding. It has been hypothesized that strictly aquatic parasites with intermediate hosts will behave as panmictic populations among hosts because ample opportunity exists for random mixing of unrelated individuals during transmission to the definitive host. A previous allozyme study on the marine trematode Lecithochirium fusiforme did not support this hypothesis in that there was genetic differentiation among,...

Data from: Kinship of long-term associates in the highly social sperm whale

Joel G Ortega-Ortiz, Daniel Engelhaupt, Martha Winsor, Bruce R Mate & A Rus Hoelzel
The evolution of stable social groups can be promoted by both indirect and direct fitness benefits. Sperm whales (Physeter macrocephalus) are highly social, with a hierarchical social structure based around core groups of adult females and sub-adults, a rare level of complexity among mammals. We combined long-term satellite tracking (ranging from 11 to 607 days) of 51 individual sperm whales with genetic kinship analysis to assess the pattern of kin associations within and among coherent...

Data from: Microsatellite primers for the Pacific Northwest endemic conifer Chamaecyparis lawsoniana (Cupressaceae)

Tara N. Jennings, Brian J. Knaus, Scott Kolpak & Richard Cronn
Microsatellite primers were developed for the Pacific Northwest conifer, Chamaecyparis lawsoniana (A. Murray) Parl. (Cupressaceae), to enhance efficiencies in disease-resistance breeding and germplasm screening for gene conservation of this rare species. Using multiplexed massively parallel Illumina sequencing, we identified over 300,000 microsatellite-containing sequences from 2 million paired-end microreads. After stringent filtering and primer evaluation, we selected 11 primer pairs and used these to screen variation in 4 populations of C. lawsoniana. Loci show between three...

Data from: Kinship of long-term associates in the highly social sperm whale

Joel G Ortega-Ortiz, Daniel Engelhaupt, Martha Winsor, Bruce R Mate & A Rus Hoelzel
The evolution of stable social groups can be promoted by both indirect and direct fitness benefits. Sperm whales (Physeter macrocephalus) are highly social, with a hierarchical social structure based around core groups of adult females and sub-adults, a rare level of complexity among mammals. We combined long-term satellite tracking (ranging from 11 to 607 days) of 51 individual sperm whales with genetic kinship analysis to assess the pattern of kin associations within and among coherent...

Data from: Microsatellite primers for the Pacific Northwest endemic conifer Chamaecyparis lawsoniana (Cupressaceae)

Tara N. Jennings, Brian J. Knaus, Scott Kolpak & Richard Cronn
Microsatellite primers were developed for the Pacific Northwest conifer, Chamaecyparis lawsoniana (A. Murray) Parl. (Cupressaceae), to enhance efficiencies in disease-resistance breeding and germplasm screening for gene conservation of this rare species. Using multiplexed massively parallel Illumina sequencing, we identified over 300,000 microsatellite-containing sequences from 2 million paired-end microreads. After stringent filtering and primer evaluation, we selected 11 primer pairs and used these to screen variation in 4 populations of C. lawsoniana. Loci show between three...

Data from: More than meets the eye: detecting cryptic microgeographic population structure in a parasite with a complex life cycle

Charles D Criscione, Román Vilas, Esperanza Paniagua & Michael S Blouin
Nonrandom recruitment of parasites among hosts can lead to genetic differentiation among hosts and mating dynamics that promote inbreeding. It has been hypothesized that strictly aquatic parasites with intermediate hosts will behave as panmictic populations among hosts because ample opportunity exists for random mixing of unrelated individuals during transmission to the definitive host. A previous allozyme study on the marine trematode Lecithochirium fusiforme did not support this hypothesis in that there was genetic differentiation among,...

Data from: The million-year wait for macroevolutionary bursts

Josef C Uyeda, Thomas F Hansen, Stevan J Arnold, Jason Pienaar, S. J. Arnold, J. Pienaar & T. F. Hansen
We lack a comprehensive understanding of evolutionary pattern and process because short-term and long-term data have rarely been combined into a single analytical framework. Here we test alternative models of phenotypic evolution using a dataset of unprecedented size and temporal span (nearly 8,000 data points). The data are body-size measurements taken from historical studies, the fossil record, and among-species comparative data representing mammals, squamates, and birds. By analyzing this unusually large dataset, we identify stochastic...

Data from: Hybridization and barriers to gene flow in an island bird radiation

Ben H. Warren, Eldredge Bermingham, Yann Bourgeois, Laura K. Estep, Robert P. Prys-Jones, Dominique Strasberg & Christophe Thébaud
While reinforcement may play a role in all major modes of speciation, relatively little is known about the timescale over which species hybridize without evolving complete reproductive isolation. Birds have high potential for hybridization, and islands provide simple settings for uncovering speciation and hybridization patterns. Here we develop a phylogenetic hypothesis for a phenotypically-diverse radiation of finch-like weaver-birds (Foudia) endemic to the western Indian Ocean islands. We find that unlike Darwin’s finches, each island-endemic Foudia...

Data from: Comparative analyses of effective population size within and among species: ranid frogs as a case study

Ivan C Phillipsen, W. Chris Funk, Eric A. Hoffman, Kirsten J. Monsen & Michael S. Blouin
It has recently become practicable to estimate the effective sizes (Ne) of multiple populations within species. Such efforts are valuable for estimating Ne in evolutionary modeling and conservation planning. We used microsatellite loci to estimate Ne of 90 populations of four ranid frogs (20 to 26 populations per species, mean n per population = 29). Our objectives were to determine typical values of Ne for populations of each species, compare Ne estimates among the species,...

Registration Year

  • 2011
    12

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    12

Affiliations

  • Oregon State University
    12
  • North-West University
    2
  • Texas A&M University
    2
  • United States Department of Agriculture
    2
  • Montclair State University
    2
  • Durham University
    2
  • University of Oslo
    2
  • University of East Anglia
    2
  • French National Centre for Scientific Research
    2
  • University of Santiago de Compostela
    2