35 Works

Data from: Staying close to home? Genetic differentiation of rough-toothed dolphins near oceanic islands in the central Pacific Ocean

G. Renee Albertson, Robin W. Baird, Marc Oremus, M. Michael Poole, Karen K. Martien & C. Scott Baker
Rough-toothed dolphins have a worldwide tropical and subtropical distribution, yet little is known about the population structure and social organization of this typically open-ocean species. Although it has been assumed that pelagic dolphins range widely due to the lack of apparent barriers and unpredictable prey distribution, recent evidence suggests rough-toothed dolphins exhibit fidelity to some oceanic islands. Using the most comprehensively extensive dataset for this species to date, we assess the isolation and interchange of...

Data from: What influences the worldwide genetic structure of sperm whales (Physeter macrocephalus)?

Alana Alexander, Debbie Steel, Kendra Hoekzema, Sarah L. Mesnick, Daniel Engelhaupt, Iain Kerr, Roger Payne & Charles Scott Baker
The interplay of natural selection and genetic drift, influenced by geographic isolation, mating systems and population size, determines patterns of genetic diversity within species. The sperm whale provides an interesting example of a long-lived species with few geographic barriers to dispersal. Worldwide mtDNA diversity is relatively low, but highly structured among geographic regions and social groups, attributed to female philopatry. However, it is unclear whether this female philopatry is due to geographic regions or social...

Data from: Long-term aggregation of larval fish siblings during dispersal along an open coast

Daniel Ottmann, Kirsten Grorud-Colvert, Nicholas M. Sard, Brittany E. Huntington, Michael A. Banks & Su Sponaugle
Pelagic dispersal of most benthic marine organisms is a fundamental driver of population distribution and persistence and is thought to lead to highly mixed populations. However, the mechanisms driving dispersal pathways of larvae along open coastlines are largely unknown. To examine the degree to which early stages can remain spatially coherent during dispersal, we measured genetic relatedness within a large pulse of newly recruited splitnose rockfish (Sebastes diploproa), a live-bearing fish whose offspring settle along...

Data from: Replicated landscape genetic and network analyses reveal wide variation in functional connectivity for American pikas

Jessica A. Castillo, Clinton W. Epps, Mackenzie R. Jeffress, Chris Ray, Thomas J. Rodhouse & Donelle Schwalm
Landscape connectivity is essential for maintaining viable populations, particularly for species restricted to fragmented habitats or naturally arrayed in metapopulations and facing rapid climate change. The importance of assessing both structural connectivity (the physical distribution of favorable habitat patches) and functional connectivity (how species move among habitat patches) for managing such species is well understood. However, the degree to which functional connectivity for a species varies among landscapes, and the resulting implications for conservation, have...

Data from: Tropical forest fragmentation limits movements, but not occurrence of a generalist pollinator species

Noelia L. Volpe, W. Douglas Robinson, Sarah J. K. Frey, Adam S. Hadley & Matthew G. Betts
Habitat loss and fragmentation influence species distributions and therefore ecological processes that depend upon them. Pollination may be particularly susceptible to fragmentation, as it depends on frequent pollinator movement. Unfortunately, most pollinators are too small to track efficiently which has precluded testing the hypothesis that habitat fragmentation reduces or eliminates pollen flow by disrupting pollinator movement. We used radio-telemetry to examine space use of the green hermit hummingbird (Phaethornis guy), an important 'hub' pollinator of...

Data from: MonotomidGen – A matrix-based interactive key to the New World genera of Monotomidae (Coleoptera, Cucujoidea)

Thomas C. McElrath, Olivia F. Boyd & Joseph V. McHugh
A matrix-based Lucid key is presented for the twelve genera of Monotomidae (Coleoptera: Cucujoidea) represented in the New World. A general overview is given for the features and technical specifications of an original interactive key for the identification of these genera. The list of terminal taxa included with the key provides a current summary of monotomid generic diversity for the Nearctic and Neotropical regions.

Data from: Phylogenetic context determines the role of competition in adaptive radiation

Jiaqi Tan, Matthew R. Slattery, Xian Yang & Lin Jiang
Understanding ecological mechanisms regulating the evolution of biodiversity is of much interest to ecologists and evolutionary biologists. Adaptive radiation constitutes an important evolutionary process that generates biodiversity. Competition has long been thought to influence adaptive radiation, but the directionality of its effect and associated mechanisms remain ambiguous. Here, we report a rigorous experimental test of the role of competition on adaptive radiation using the rapidly evolving bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens SBW25 interacting with multiple bacterial species...

Data from: Discrimination of fast click series produced by tagged Risso’s dolphins (Grampus griseus) for echolocation or communication

Patricia Arranz, Stacy L. DeRuiter, Alison K. Stimpert, Silvana Neves, Ari S. Friedlaender, Jeremy A. Goldbogen, Fleur Visser, John Calambokidis, Brandon L. Southall & Peter L. Tyack
Early studies that categorized odontocete pulsed sounds had few means of discriminating signals used for biosonar-based foraging from those used for communication. This capability to identify the function of sounds is important for understanding and interpreting behavior; it is also essential for monitoring and mitigating potential disturbance from human activities. Archival tags were placed on free-ranging Grampus griseus to quantify and discriminate between pulsed sounds used for echolocation-based foraging and those used for communication. Two...

Data from: Foraging at the edge of the world: low‐altitude, high‐speed maneuvering in barn swallows

Douglas R. Warrick, Tyson L. Hedrick, Andrew A. Biewener, Kristen E. Crandell & Bret W. Tobalske
While prior studies of swallow manoeuvering have focused on slow-speed flight and obstacle avoidance in still air, swallows survive by foraging at high speeds in windy environments. Recent advances in field-portable, high-speed video systems, coupled with precise anemometry, permit measures of high-speed aerial performance of birds in a natural state. We undertook the present study to test: (i) the manner in which barn swallows (Hirundo rustica) may exploit wind dynamics and ground effect while foraging...

Data from: Within guild co-infections influence parasite community membership: a longitudinal study in African Buffalo

Brian Henrichs, Marinda C. Oosthuizen, Milana Troskie, Erin Gorsich, Carmen Gondhalekar, Brianna Beechler, Vanessa O. Ezenwa, Anna E. Jolles & Brianna R. Beechler
1. Experimental studies in laboratory settings have demonstrated a critical role of parasite interactions in shaping parasite communities. The sum of these interactions can produce diverse effects on individual hosts as well as influence disease emergence and persistence at the population level. 2. A predictive framework for the effects of parasite interactions in the wild remains elusive, largely because of limited longitudinal or experimental data on parasite communities of free-ranging hosts. 3. This four year...

Registration Year

  • 2016
    35

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    35

Affiliations

  • Oregon State University
    35
  • University of Washington
    3
  • University of Georgia
    3
  • United States Department of Agriculture
    3
  • University of Sydney
    3
  • University of Kansas
    2
  • Stanford University
    2
  • Southwest Fisheries Science Center
    2
  • University of California, Santa Barbara
    2
  • University of St Andrews
    2