9 Works

Data from: Ageing and reproduction: antioxidant supplementation alleviates telomere loss in wild birds

Elisa P. Badas, Javier Martínez, Juan Rivero De Aguilar Cachafeiro, Francisco Miranda, Jordi Figuerola & Santiago Merino
Reproduction is inherently costly. Environmental stressors, such as infection and limited food resources, can compromise investment at each breeding attempt. For example, recent data on captive birds showed that increased reproductive effort accelerates ageing. However, the effects of nutritional status and infection on ageing remain unknown. Telomeres function as protective caps at the ends of eukaryotic chromosomes, and changes in telomere length is a commonly used proxy for ageing. To partially address the mechanisms of...

Data from: Dark pigmentation limits thermal niche position in birds

Ismael Galván, Sol Rodríguez-Martínez & Luis M. Carrascal
1. Animal pigmentation has evolved because of several adaptive functions. In the case of pigmentation produced by melanins, the most common pigments in animals, the main function is protection against UV radiation. However, pigmentation also affects animal surface's ability to absorb solar radiation and gain heat, which may represent a thermal constraint for endotherms due to their relatively high and constant body temperatures. 2. As darker colours absorb more radiation than lighter colours, dark-pigmented endotherm...

Data from: Effects of experimental night lighting on the daily timing of winter foraging in common European songbirds

Arnaud Da Silva, David Diez-Méndez & Bart Kempenaers
The ecological effects of light pollution are becoming better understood, especially in birds. Recent studies have shown that several bird species can use street lighting to extend activity into the night during the breeding season. However, most of these studies are correlational and little is known about the effects of artificial night lighting on the timing of activities outside the breeding season. During winter, low temperatures and short days may limit foraging opportunities and can...

Data from: Influences of environmental and spatial factors on genetic and epigenetic variations in Rhododendron oldhamii (Ericaceae)

Chun-Lin Huang, Jui-Hung Chen, Ming-Hsuan Tsang, Jeng-Der Chung, Chung-Te Chang & Shih-Ying Hwang
Test of the relationship of genetic and particularly epigenetic variation with geographic isolation and environment is important to reveal potential environmental drivers for selection. Rhododendron oldhamii is widespread but inhabits fragmented subtropical forest landscapes and populations across its range may exhibit different levels of genetic and epigenetic structuring correlated to their environmental conditions. Here, we investigated the genetic and epigenetic variations and their ecological correlates in R. oldhamii. Genetic and epigenetic variations were surveyed using...

Data from: Too hard to swallow: a secret secondary defence of an aposematic insect

Lu-Yi Wang, Wen-San Huang, Hsin-Chieh Tang, Lung-Chun Huang & Chung-Ping Lin
Anti-predator strategies are significant components of adaptation in prey species. Aposematic prey are expected to possess effective defences that have evolved simultaneously with their warning colours. This study tested the hypothesis of the defensive function and ecological significance of the hard body in aposematic Pachyrhynchus weevils pioneered by Alfred Russel Wallace nearly 150 years ago. We used predation trials with Japalura tree lizards to assess the survivorship of ‘hard’ (mature) vs. ‘soft’ (teneral) and ‘clawed’...

Data from: Does maternal care evolve through egg recognition or directed territoriality?

Wen-San Huang & David A Pike
The mechanism which facilitates the evolution of maternal care is ambiguous in egg-laying terrestrial vertebrates: does the ability of mothers to recognize their own eggs lead them under some circumstances to begin providing care, or can maternal care evolve from simply being in close proximity to eggs (e.g., through territorial behavior)? This question is difficult to answer because in most species parental care is either absent altogether or present; in few species do we have...

Eggs survive through avian guts—A possible mechanism for transoceanic dispersal of flightless weevils

Hui-Yun Tseng, Si‐Min Lin, Tsui‐Wen Li, Chia‐Hsin Liou, Ace Kevin S. Amarga & Analyn Cabras
How flightless animals disperse to remote oceanic islands is a key unresolved question in biogeography. The flightless Pachyrhynchus weevils represent repetitive colonization history in West Pacific islands, which attracted our interests about how some weevils have successfully dispersed in the reverse direction against the sea current. Here, we propose endozoochory as a possible mechanism that the eggs of the weevils might be carried by embedded in the fruits as the food of frugivorous birds. In...

Data from: Genetic relationships and ecological divergence in Salix species and populations in Taiwan

Chun-Lin Huang, Chung-Te Chang, Bing-Hong Huang, Jeng-Der Chung, Jui-Hung Chen, Yu-Chung Chiang & Shih-Ying Hwang
Linking ecology with evolutionary biology is important to understand how environments drive population and species divergence. Phenotypically diverse Salix species, such as lowland riparian willow trees and middle- to high-elevation multistemmed shrubs and alpine dwarf shrubs, provide opportunities for studying genetic divergence driven by ecological factors. We used amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) to quantify the genetic variation of 185 individuals from nine populations of four Salix species in Taiwan. Our phylogenetic analyses distinguished two...

Data from: Does maternal care evolve through egg recognition or directed territoriality?

Wen-San Huang & David A Pike
The mechanism which facilitates the evolution of maternal care is ambiguous in egg-laying terrestrial vertebrates: does the ability of mothers to recognize their own eggs lead them under some circumstances to begin providing care, or can maternal care evolve from simply being in close proximity to eggs (e.g., through territorial behavior)? This question is difficult to answer because in most species parental care is either absent altogether or present; in few species do we have...

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