9 Works

Data from: Landscape connectivity predicts chronic wasting disease risk in Canada

Barry R. Nobert, Evelyn H. Merrill, Margo J. Pybus, Trent K. Bollinger & Yeen Ten Hwang
Predicting the spatial pattern of disease risk in wild animal populations is important for implementing effective control programmes. We developed a risk model predicting the probability that a deer harvested in a wild population was chronic wasting disease positive (CWD+) and evaluated the importance of landscape connectivity based on deer movements. We quantified landscape connectivity from deer ‘resistance’ to move across the landscape similar to the flow of electrical current across a hypothetical electronic circuit....

Data from: Northern flickers only work when they have to: how individual traits, population size and landscape disturbances affect excavation rates of an ecosystem engineer

Karen Wiebe & Karen L. Wiebe
Woodpeckers are considered ecosystem engineers because they excavate tree cavities which are used subsequently by many species of secondary cavity nesters for breeding. Woodpeckers have the choice of excavating a new hole or reusing an existing one, and this propensity to excavate (e) may affect community dynamics but has rarely been investigated. Using 18 years of data on a population of northern flickers Colaptes auratus, I tested six hypotheses to explain the propensity to excavate...

Data from: Climatic conditions cause spatially dynamic polygyny thresholds in a large mammal

Jeffrey A. Manning & Philip D. Mcloughlin
The polygyny threshold (PT) is a critical transition point in the sexual selection process for many organisms in natural populations, characterizing when females choose to mate with an already mated male over an unmated one to improve fitness. Understanding its causes and consequences is therefore of high interest. While both theoretical and empirical work suggest that the degree of polygyny within a species is plastic and a function of male inequality, the functional relationship between...

Data from: Pathologic evaluation of type 2 porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus infection at the maternal-fetal interface of late gestation pregnant gilts

Predrag Novakovic, John C.S. Harding, Ahmad N. Al-Dissi, Andrea Ladinig, Susan E. Detmer & John C. S. Harding
The pathogenesis of fetal death caused by reproductive porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) remains unclear. The objective of this study was to improve our understanding of the pathogenesis by assessing potential relationships between specific histopathological lesions and PRRSV RNA concentration in the fetuses and the maternal-fetal interface. Pregnant gilts were inoculated with PRRSV (n=114) or sham inoculated (n=19) at 85±1 days of gestation. Dams and their litters were humanely euthanized and necropsied 21...

Data from: Experience with predators shapes learning rules in larval amphibians

Adam L. Crane, Brandon S. Demuth & Maud C.O. Ferrari
Experience is essential for many prey species that must learn about predation risk to survive and reproduce. How prey incorporate information about predation risk via multiple learning events has been the subject of several studies, but results have been inconsistent, with cases where multiple conditionings have enhanced or weakened the learned responses. We hypothesized that such different outcomes reflect differences in the timing and frequency of past experience with the predator. To test this hypothesis,...

Data from: Archaea and bacteria mediate the effects of native species root loss on fungi during plant invasion

Steven D. Mamet, Eric G. Lamb, Candace L. Piper, Tristrom Winsley & Steven D. Siciliano
Although invasive plants can drive ecosystem change, little is known about the directional nature of belowground interactions between invasive plants, native roots, bacteria, archaea and fungi. We used detailed bioinformatics and a recently developed root assay on soils collected in fescue grassland along a gradient of smooth brome (Bromus inermis Leyss) invasion to examine the links between smooth brome shoot litter and root, archaea, bacteria and fungal communities. We examined (1) aboveground versus belowground influences...

Data from: A rare study from the wintering grounds provides insight into the costs of malaria infection for migratory birds

Marjorie C. Sorensen, Muhammad Asghar, Staffan Bensch, Graham D. Fairhurst, Susanne Jenni-Eiermann & Claire N. Spottiswoode
Malaria parasites can have strong effects on the population dynamics and evolution of migratory bird species. In many species, parasite transmission occurs on the wintering grounds, but studies to determine the consequences of infection have taken place during the breeding season, when malaria parasites circulate at chronic levels. We examined the predictors of malarial infections for great reed warblers during the northern winter in Africa, where active parasite transmission is thought to occur and naïve...

Data from: Prenatal exposure to predation affects predator recognition learning via lateralization plasticity

Tyrone Lucon-Xiccato, Douglas P. Chivers, Matthew D. Mitchell & Maud C. O. Ferrari
Prey with cerebral lateralization often shows a bias in escape direction and asymmetrical use of eyes for scanning. Such asymmetries are likely to cause ecological disadvantages when, for example, predators attack from the side in which the prey is more susceptible. However, lateralized individuals are diffuse in many species and, paradoxically, their frequency increases via developmental plasticity in environments with high-predation risk. Using wood frog tadpoles, Lithobates sylvaticus, we tested the hypothesis that cerebral lateralization...

Data from: Are more diverse parts of the mammalian skull more labile?

Marta Linde-Medina, Julia C. Boughner, Sharlene E. Santana & Rui Diogo
Morphological variation is unevenly distributed within the mammalian skull; some of its parts have diversified more than others. It is commonly thought that this pattern of variation is mainly the result of the structural organization of the skull, as defined by the pattern and magnitude of trait covariation. Patterns of trait covariation can facilitate morphological diversification if they are aligned in the direction of selection, or these patterns can constrain diversification if oriented in a...

Registration Year

  • 2016
    9

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    9

Affiliations

  • University of Saskatchewan
    9
  • University of Padua
    1
  • Government of Alberta
    1
  • University of Washington
    1
  • Lund University
    1
  • University of Cambridge
    1
  • University of Alberta
    1
  • Ministry of Environment
    1
  • University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna
    1
  • Swiss Ornithological Institute
    1