407 Works

Data from: Simultaneous fMRI and EEG during the multi-source interference task

John A. Robertson, Alex W. Thomas, Frank S. Prato, Mikael Johansson & Henrietta Nittby
Background: fMRI and EEG are two non-invasive functional imaging techniques within cognitive neuroscience that have complementary advantages to obtain both temporal and spatial information. The multi-source interference task (MSIT) has been shown to generate robust activations of the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) on both a single-subject level and in group averages, in fMRI studies. We have now simultaneously acquired fMRI and EEG during a cognitive interference task. Materials and Methods: Healthy volunteers were tested...

Data from: A mimicked bacterial infection prolongs stopover duration in songbirds – but more pronounced in short- than long-distance migrants

Arne Hegemann, Pablo Alcalde Abril, Sissel Sjöberg, Rachel Muheim, Thomas Alerstam, Jan-Åke Nilsson & Dennis Hasselquist
1) Migration usually consists of intermittent travel and stopovers, the latter being crucially important for individuals to recover and refuel to successfully complete migration. Quantifying how sickness behaviours influence stopovers is crucial for our understanding of migration ecology and how diseases spread. However, little is known about infections in songbirds, which constitute the majority of avian migrants. 2) We experimentally immune-challenged autumn migrating passerines (both short- and long-distance migrating species) with a simulated bacterial infection....

Data from: The measurement of selection when detection is imperfect: how good are naïve methods?

John Waller & Erik I. Svensson
The life spans of animals can be measured in natural populations by uniquely marking individuals and then releasing them into the field. Selection on survival (a component of fitness) can subsequently be quantified by regressing the life spans of these marked individuals on their trait values. However, marked individuals are not always seen on every subsequent catching occasion, and for this reason, imperfect detection is considered a problem when estimating survival selection in natural populations....

Data from: Local and landscape-level floral resources explain effects of wildflower strips on wild bees across four European countries

Jeroen Scheper, Riccardo Bommarco, Andrea Holzschuh, Simon G. Potts, Verena Riedinger, Stuart P. M. Roberts, , Henrik G. Smith, Ingolf Steffan-Dewenter, Jennifer B. Wickens, Victoria J. Wickens & David Kleijn
1. Growing evidence for declines in wild bees calls for the development and implementation of effective mitigation measures. Enhancing floral resources is a widely accepted measure for promoting bees in agricultural landscapes, but effectiveness varies considerably between landscapes and regions. We hypothesize that this variation is mainly driven by a combination of the direct effects of measures on local floral resources and the availability of floral resources in the surrounding landscape. 2. To test this,...

Data from: Evolution of novel wood decay mechanisms in Agaricales revealed by the genome sequences of Fistulina hepatica and Cylindrobasidium torrendii

Dimitrios Floudas, Benjamin W. Held, Robert Riley, Laszlo G. Nagy, Gage Koehler, Anthony S. Ransdell, Hina Younus, Julianna Chow, Jennifer Chiniquy, Anna Lipzen, Andrew Tritt, Hui Sun, Sajeet Haridas, Kurt LaButti, Robin A. Ohm, Ursula Kues, Robert A. Blanchette, Igor V. Grigoriev, Robert E. Minto & David S. Hibbett
Wood decay mechanisms in Agaricomycotina have been traditionally separated in two categories termed white and brown rot. Recently the accuracy of such a dichotomy has been questioned. Here, we present the genome sequences of the white rot fungus Cylindrobasidium torrendii and the brown rot fungus Fistulina hepatica both members of Agaricales, combining comparative genomics and wood decay experiments. Cylindrobasidium torrendii is closely related to the white-rot root pathogen Armillaria mellea, while F. hepatica is related...

Data from: Visual modelling suggests a weak relationship between the evolution of ultraviolet vision and plumage colouration in birds

Olle Lind & Kaspar Delhey
Birds have sophisticated colour vision mediated by four cones types that cover a wide visual spectrum including ultraviolet (UV) wavelengths. Many birds have modest UV-sensitivity provided by violet-sensitive (VS) cones with sensitivity maxima between 400-425 nm. However, some birds have evolved higher UV-sensitivity and a larger visual spectrum given by UV-sensitive (UVS) cones maximally sensitive at 360-370 nm. The reasons for VS-UVS transitions and their relationship to visual ecology remain unclear. It has been hypothesized...

Data from: Convergent losses of decay mechanisms and rapid turnover of symbiosis genes in mycorrhizal mutualists

Annegret Kohler, Alan Kuo, Laszlo G. Nagy, Emmanuelle Morin, Kerrie W. Barry, Francois Buscot, Bjorn Canback, Cindy Choi, Nicolas Cichocki, Alicia Clum, Jan Colpaert, Alex Copeland, Mauricio D. Costa, Jeanne Dore, Dimitrios Floudas, Gilles Gay, Mariangela Girlanda, Bernard Henrissat, Sylvie Herrmann, Jaqueline Hess, Nils Hogberg, Tomas Johansson, Hassine-Radhouane Khouja, Kurt LaButti, Urs Lahrmann … & Francis Martin
To elucidate the genetic bases of mycorrhizal lifestyle evolution, we sequenced new fungal genomes, including 13 ectomycorrhizal (ECM), orchid (ORM) and ericoid (ERM) species, and five saprotrophs, which we analyzed along with other fungal genomes. Ectomycorrhizal fungi have a reduced complement of genes encoding plant cell wall–degrading enzymes (PCWDEs), as compared to their ancestral wood decayers. Nevertheless, they have retained a unique array of PCWDEs, thus suggesting that they possess diverse abilities to decompose lignocellulose....

Data from: Intra- and intersexual differences in parasite resistance and female fitness tolerance in a polymorphic insect

Beatriz Willink & Erik I. Svensson
To understand host–parasite interactions, it is necessary to quantify variation and covariation in defence traits. We quantified parasite resistance and fitness tolerance of a polymorphic damselfly (Ischnura elegans), an insect with three discrete female colour morphs but with monomorphic males. We quantified sex and morph differences in parasite resistance (prevalence and intensity of water mite infections) and morph-specific fitness tolerance in the females in natural populations for over a decade. There was no evidence for...

Data from: Habitat filtering determines the functional niche occupancy of plant communities worldwide

Yuanzhi Li, Bill Shipley, Jodi N. Price, Vinícius De L. Dantas, Riin Tamme, Mark Westoby, Andrew Siefert, Brandon S. Schamp, Marko J. Spasojevic, Vincent Jung, Daniel C. Laughlin, Sarah J. Richardson, Yoann Le Bagousse-Pinguet, Christian Schöb, Antonio Gazol, Honor C. Prentice, Nicolas Gross, Jacob Overton, Marcus V. Cianciaruso, Frédérique Louault, Chiho Kamiyama, Tohru Nakashizuka, Kouki Hikosaka, Takehiro Sasaki, Masatoshi Katabuchi … & Marco A. Batalha
How the patterns of niche occupancy vary from species-poor to species-rich communities is a fundamental question in ecology that has a central bearing on the processes that drive patterns of biodiversity. As species richness increases, habitat filtering should constrain the expansion of total niche volume, while limiting similarity should restrict the degree of niche overlap between species. Here, by explicitly incorporating intraspecific trait variability, we investigate the relationship between functional niche occupancy and species richness...

Data from: Hybridization patterns between two marine snails, Littorina fabalis and L. obtusata

Diana Costa, Graciela Sotelo, Antigoni Kaliontzopoulou, João Carvalho, Roger Butlin, Johan Hollander & Rui Faria
Characterizing the patterns of hybridization between closely related species is crucial to understand the role of gene flow in speciation. In particular, systems comprising multiple contacts between sister species offer an outstanding opportunity to investigate how reproductive isolation varies with environmental conditions, demography and geographic contexts of divergence. The flat periwinkles, Littorina obtusata and L. fabalis (Gastropoda), are two intertidal sister species with marked ecological differences compatible with late stages of speciation. Although hybridization between...

Imaging of the vulnerable carotid plaque: role of imaging techniques and a research agenda

Iacopo Fabiani, Carlo Palombo, Davide Caramella, Jan Nilsson & Raffaele De Caterina
Objectives: Atherothrombosis in the carotid arteries is a main cause of ischemic stroke, and may depend on plaque propensity to complicate with rupture or erosion, in turn related to qualitative features amenable to in vivo imaging. This would provide an opportunity for risk stratification and – potentially – local treatment of more “vulnerable” plaques. We here review current information on this topic. Methods: We systematically reviewed the literature for concepts derived from pathophysiological, histopathological and...

Data from: Comparison of spleen transcriptomes of two wild rodent species reveals differences in the immune response against Borrelia afzelii

Xiuqin Zhong, Max Lundberg & Lars Råberg
Different host species often differ considerably in susceptibility to a given pathogen, but the causes of such differences are rarely known. The natural hosts of the tick-transmitted bacterium Borrelia afzelii, which is one of causative agents of Lyme borreliosis in humans, include a variety of small mammals like voles and mice. Previous studies have shown that B. afzelii-infected bank voles (Myodes glareolus) have about ten times higher bacterial load than infected yellow-necked mice (Apodemus flavicollis),...

The search for sexually antagonistic genes: practical insights from studies of local adaptation and statistical genomics

Filip Ruzicka, Ludovic Dutoit, Peter Czuppon, Crispin Y. Jordan, Xiang‐Yi Li, Colin Olito, Homa Papoli Yazdi, Tim Connallon, Erik Svensson & Anna Runemark
Sexually antagonistic (SA) genetic variation—in which alleles favored in one sex are disfavored in the other—is predicted to be common and has been documented in several animal and plant populations, yet we currently know little about its pervasiveness among species or its population genetic basis. Recent applications of genomics in studies of SA genetic variation have highlighted considerable methodological challenges to the identification and characterization of SA genes, raising questions about the feasibility of genomic...

Data from: Evaluating predictive performance of statistical models explaining wild bee abundance in a mass-flowering crop

Maria Blasi Romero, Ignasi Bartomeus, Riccardo Bommarco, Vesna Gagic, Michael Garratt, Andrea Holzschuh, David Kleijn, Sandra A.M. Lindström, Peter Olsson, Chiara Polce, Simon G. Potts, , Jeroen Scheper, Henrik G. Smith, Ingolf Steffan-Dewenter & Yann Clough
Wild bee populations are threatened by current agricultural practices in many parts of the world, which may put pollination services and crop yields at risk. Loss of pollination services can potentially be predicted by models that link bee abundances with landscape-scale land-use, but there is little knowledge on the degree to which these statistical models are transferable across time and space. This study assesses the transferability of models for wild bee abundance in a mass-flowering...

Balancing selection in Pattern Recognition Receptor signalling pathways is associated with gene function and pleiotropy in a wild rodent

Lars Råberg, Max Lundberg, Xiuqin Zhong, Anna Konrad & Remi-André Olsen
Pathogen-mediated balancing selection is commonly considered to play an important role in the maintenance of genetic diversity, in particular in immune genes. However, there has not been any systematic analysis of what factors influence which immune genes are the targets of such selection. To address this, we here focus on Pattern Recognition Receptor (PRR) signalling pathways, which play a key role in innate immunity. We used whole-genome resequencing data from a population of bank voles...

Data from: Female-limited X-chromosome evolution effects on male pre- and post-copulatory success

Yesbol Manat, Katrine Lund-Hansen, Georgios Katsianis & Jessica Abbott
In our article, entitled “Female-limited X-chromosome evolution effects on male pre- and post-copulatory success”, we carried out a female-limited X chromosome evolution experiment to study the effect of X-linked sexually antagonistic genetic variance on male reproductive traits. By limiting expression of the X chromosome to females for multiple generations, we removed male selective constraints, which should allow X-linked female-beneficial alleles to increase in frequency. As a result, expressing the experimentally evolved X chromosome in males,...

Don’t judge a lizard by its colour: no evidence for differential socio-sexual behaviour and space use in the colour morphs of the European common wall lizard (Podarcis muralis)

Javier Abalos, Guillem Pérez I De Lanuza, Alicia Bartolomé, Océane Liehrmann, Hanna Laakkonen, Fabien Aubret, Tobias Uller, Pau Carazo & Enrique Font
Explaining the evolutionary origin and maintenance of colour polymorphisms is a major challenge in evolutionary biology. Such polymorphisms are commonly thought to reflect the existence of alternative behavioural or life-history strategies under negative frequency-dependent selection. The European common wall lizard Podarcis muralis exhibits a striking ventral colour polymorphism that has been intensely studied and is often assumed to reflect alternative reproductive strategies, similar to the iconic “rock-paper-scissors” system described in the North American lizard Uta...

A study of tactical and sexual dimorphism in cognition with insights for sexual conflict

Hannah Griebling, Oscar Rios-Cardenas, Jessica Abbott & Molly Morris
The sexes may have different optima in cognitive traits due to differences in life history strategies and the expense of investing in metabolically costly brain tissue. However, given genetic correlations, each sex could be constrained from reaching its cognitive optimum due to intralocus sexual conflict. We compared learning performance of two male alternative reproductive tactics and females from known genotypes (both sire and dam) in the livebearing fish Xiphophorus multilineatus. We predicted that females’ learning...

Bedrock weathering controls on terrestrial carbon-nitrogen-climate interactions

Pawlok Dass, Benjamin Houlton, Yingping Wang, David Warlind & Scott Morford
Anthropogenic nitrogen deposition is widely considered to increase CO2 sequestration by land plant communities on a global scale. Here, we suggest that bedrock nitrogen weathering contributes significantly more to nitrogen-carbon interactions than anthropogenic nitrogen deposition. This working hypothesis is based on the application of empirical results into a global biogeochemical simulation model from the mid-1800s to the end of the 21st century. We demonstrate that rock nitrogen inputs have contributed roughly 2 to 11 times...

Data and code from: The evolution of developmental thresholds and reaction norms for age and size at maturity

Viktor Nilsson & Locke Rowe
Developing organisms typically mature earlier and at larger sizes in favorable growth conditions, while in rarer cases maturity is delayed. The rarer reaction norm is easily accommodated by general life history models, whereas the common pattern is not. Theory suggests that a solution to this paradox lies in the existence of developmental thresholds that define the minimum size at which maturation or metamorphosis can commence, and in the evolution of these threshold sizes in response...

Elevated temperature increases genome-wide selection on de novo mutations

David Berger, Josefine Stångberg, Julian Baur & Richard Walters
Adaptation in new environments depends on the amount of genetic variation available for evolution, and the efficacy by which natural selection discriminates among this variation. However, whether some ecological factors reveal more genetic variation, or impose stronger selection pressures than others, is typically not known. Here, we apply enzyme kinetic theory to show that rising global temperatures are predicted to intensify natural selection throughout the genome by increasing the effects of DNA sequence variation on...

Data from: Opsins in Onychophora (velvet worms) suggest a single origin and subsequent diversification of visual pigments in arthropods

Lars Hering, Miriam J. Henze, Martin Kohler, Almut Kelber, Christoph Bleidorn, Maren Leschke, Birgit Nickel, Matthias Meyer, Martin Kircher, Paul Sunnucks & Georg Mayer
Multiple visual pigments, prerequisites for color vision, are found in arthropods, but the evolutionary origin of their diversity remains obscure. In this study, we explore the opsin genes in five distantly related species of Onychophora, using deep transcriptome sequencing and screening approaches. Surprisingly, our data reveal the presence of only one opsin gene (onychopsin) in each onychophoran species, and our behavioral experiments indicate a maximum sensitivity of onychopsin to blue–green light. In our phylogenetic analyses,...

Innate preference hierarchies coupled with adult experience, rather than larval imprinting or transgenerational acclimation, determine host plant use in Pieris rapae

Hampus Petrén, Gabriele Gloder, Diana Posledovich, Christer Wiklund & Magne Friberg
The evolution of host range drives diversification in phytophagous insects, and understanding the female oviposition choices is pivotal for understanding host specialization. One controversial mechanism for female host choice is Hopkins’ host selection principle, where females are predicted to increase their preference for the host species they were feeding upon as larvae. A recent hypothesis posits that such larval imprinting is especially adaptive in combination with anticipatory transgenerational acclimation, so that females both allocate and...

Effects of back‐mounted biologgers on condition, diving and flight performance in a breeding seabird

Tom J. Evans, Rebecca C. Young, Hannah Watson, Olof Olsson & Susanne Åkesson
Biologging devices are providing detailed insights into the behaviour and movement of animals in their natural environments. It is usually assumed that this method of gathering data does not impact on the behaviour observed. However, potential negative effects on birds have rarely been investigated before field‐based studies are initiated. Seabirds which both fly and use pursuit diving may be particularly sensitive to increases in drag and load resulting from carrying biologging devices. We studied chick‐rearing...

Drought legacy affects microbial community trait distributions related to moisture along a savannah grassland precipitation gradient

Ainara Leizeaga, Lettice C. Hicks, Lokeshwaran Manoharan, Christine V. Hawkes & Johannes Rousk
Ecosystem models commonly use stable-state assumptions to predict responses of soil microbial functions to environmental change. However, past climatic conditions can shape microbial functional responses resulting in a “legacy effect”. For instance, exposure to drier conditions in the field may shape how soil microbial communities respond to subsequent drought and drying and rewetting events. We investigated microbial tolerance to low moisture levels (“resistance”) and ability to recover after a drying and rewetting (DRW) perturbation (“resilience”)...

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