44 Works

Data from: Nocturnal migratory songbirds adjust their travelling direction aloft: evidence from a radiotelemetry and radar study

Sissel Sjöberg & Cecilia Nilsson
In order to fully understand the orientation behaviour of migrating birds, it is important to understand when birds set their travel direction. Departure directions of migratory passerines leaving stopover sites are often assumed to reflect the birds' intended travel directions, but this assumption has not been critically tested. We used data from an automated radiotelemetry system and a tracking radar at Falsterbo peninsula, Sweden, to compare the initial orientation of departing songbirds (recorded by radiotelemetry)...

Data from: The complex aerodynamic footprint of desert locusts revealed by large-volume tomographic particle image velocimetry

Per Henningsson, Dirk Michaelis, Toshiyuki Nakata, Daniel Schanz, Reinhard Geisler, Andreas Schröder & Richard J. Bomphrey
Particle image velocimetry has been the preferred experimental technique with which to study the aerodynamics of animal flight for over a decade. In that time, hardware has become more accessible and the software has progressed from the acquisition of planes through the flow field to the reconstruction of small volumetric measurements. Until now, it has not been possible to capture large volumes that incorporate the full wavelength of the aerodynamic track left behind during a...

Data from: Sexual antagonism in the pistil varies among populations of a hermaphroditic mixed-mating plant

Evan Hersh, Josefin A. Madjidian, Stefan Andersson, Maria Strandh, W. Scott Armbruster & Åsa Lankinen
Sexual conflicts and their evolutionary outcomes may be influenced by population-specific features such as mating system and ecological context; however, very few studies have investigated the link between sexual conflict and mating system. The self-compatible, mixed-mating hermaphrodite Collinsia heterophylla (Plantaginaceae) is thought to exhibit a sexual conflict over timing of stigma receptivity. This conflict involves 1) delayed stigma receptivity, which intensifies pollen competition, and 2) early fertilization forced by pollen, which reduces seed set. We...

Data from: Context-dependent effects of yolk androgens on nestling growth and immune function in a multibrooded passerine

Jaime Muriel, Pablo Salmón, Angel Nunez-Buiza, Felipe De Salas, Lorenzo Pérez-Rodríguez, Marisa Puerta & Diego Gil
Female birds may adjust their offspring phenotype to the specific requirements of the environment by differential allocation of physiologically active substances into yolks, such as androgens. Yolk androgens have been shown to accelerate embryonic development, growth rate and competitive ability of nestlings, but they can also entail immunological costs. The balance between costs and benefits of androgen allocation is expected to depend on nestling environment. We tested this hypothesis in a multibrooded passerine, the spotless...

Data from: Within-host competition between Borrelia afzelii ospC strains in wild hosts as revealed by massively parallel amplicon sequencing

Maria Strandh & Lars Råberg
Infections frequently consist of more than one strain of a given pathogen. Experiments have shown that co-infecting strains often compete, so that the infection intensity of each strain in mixed infections is lower than in single strain infections. Such within-host competition can have important epidemiological and evolutionary consequences. However, the extent of competition has rarely been investigated in wild, naturally infected hosts, where there is noise in the form of varying inoculation doses, asynchronous infections...

Data from: Uncovering cryptic parasitoid diversity in Horismenus (Chalcidoidea, Eulophidae)

Sarah G. Kenyon, Sven Buerki, Christer Hansson, Nadir Alvarez & Betty Benrey
Horismenus parasitoids are an abundant and understudied group of eulophid wasps found mainly in the New World. Recent surveys based on morphological analyses in Costa Rica have quadrupled the number of named taxa, with more than 400 species described so far. This recent revision suggests that there is still a vast number of unknown species to be identified. As Horismenus wasps have been widely described as parasitoids of insect pests associated with crop plants, it...

Data from: Oxidant trade-offs in immunity: an experimental test in a lizard

Michael Tobler, Cissy Ballen, Mo Healey, Mark Wilson & Mats Olsson
Immune system functioning and maintenance entails costs which may limit investment into other processes such as reproduction. Yet, the proximate mechanisms and ‘currencies’ mediating the costs of immune responses remain elusive. In vertebrates, up-regulation of the innate immune system is associated with rapid phagocytic production of pro-oxidant molecules (so-called ‘oxidative burst’ responses). Oxidative burst responses are intended to eliminate pathogens but may also constitute an immunopathological risk as they may induce oxidative damage to self...

Data from: Comparing analysis methods in functional calcium imaging of the insect brain

Anna Balkenius, Anders J. Johansson & Christian Balkenius
We investigate four different methods for background estimation in calcium imaging of the insect brain and evaluate their performance on six data sets consisting of data recorded from two sites in two species of moths. The calcium fluorescence decay curve outside the potential response is estimated using either a low-pass filter or constant, linear or polynomial regression, and is subsequently used to calculate the magnitude, latency and duration of the response. The magnitude and variance...

Data from: Shape up or ship out: migratory behaviour predicts morphology across spatial scale in a freshwater fish

Ben B. Chapman, Kaj Hulthén, Christer Brönmark, Anders P. Nilsson, Christian Skov, Lars-Anders Hansson & Jakob Brodersen
1. Migration is a widespread phenomenon, with powerful ecological and evolutionary consequences. Morphological adaptations to reduce the energetic costs associated with migratory transport are commonly documented for migratory species. However, few studies have investigated whether variation in body morphology can be explained by variation in migratory strategy within a species. 2. We address this question in roach Rutilus rutilus, a partially migratory freshwater fish that migrates from lakes into streams during winter. We both compare...

Data from: Balance between inbreeding and outcrossing in a nannandrous species, the moss Homalothecium lutescens

Frida Rosengren, Nils Cronberg & Bengt Hansson
Epiphytic dwarf males on the females present a possible solution to the problem of short fertilization distances in mosses. However, leptokurtic spore dispersal makes dwarf males likely to be closely related to their host shoot, with an accompanying risk of inbreeding. The capacity of a female to harbour a high number of different dwarf males suggests that there may be mechanisms in place that counteract inbreeding, such as polyandry and post-fertilization selection. We have genotyped...

Data from: Independent evolution of the sexes promotes amphibian diversification

Stephen P. De Lisle & Locke Rowe
Classic ecological theory predicts that the evolution of sexual dimorphism constrains diversification by limiting morphospace available for speciation. Alternatively, sexual selection may lead to the evolution of reproductive isolation and increased diversification. We test contrasting predictions of these hypotheses by examining the relationship between sexual dimorphism and diversification in amphibians. Our analysis shows that the evolution of sexual size dimorphism (SSD) is associated with increased diversification and speciation, contrary to the ecological theory. Further, this...

Data from: Widespread primary, but geographically restricted secondary, human introductions of wall lizards, Podarcis muralis

Sozos N. Michaelides, Geoffrey M. While, Natalia Zajac & Tobias Uller
Establishing the introduction pathways of alien species is a fundamental task in invasion biology. The common wall lizard, Podarcis muralis, has been widely introduced outside of its native range in both Europe and North America, primarily through escaped pets or deliberate release of animals from captive or wild populations. Here, we use Bayesian clustering, approximate Bayesian computation (ABC) methods and network analyses to reconstruct the origin and colonization history of 23 non-native populations of wall...

Data from: Disentangling the complex evolutionary history of the Western Palearctic blue tits (Cyanistes spp.) – phylogenomic analyses suggest radiation by multiple colonisation events and subsequent isolation

Martin Stervander, Juan Carlos Illera, Laura Kvist, Pedro Barbosa, Naomi P. Keehnen, Peter Pruisscher, Staffan Bensch & Bengt Hansson
Isolated islands and their often unique biota continue to play key roles for understanding the importance of drift, genetic variation and adaptation in the process of population differentiation and speciation. One island system that has inspired and intrigued evolutionary biologists is the blue tit complex (Cyanistes spp.) in Europe and Africa, in particular the complex evolutionary history of the multiple genetically distinct taxa of the Canary Islands. Understanding Afrocanarian colonization events is of particular importance...

Data from: Hidden costs of infection: chronic malaria accelerates telomere degradation and senescence in wild birds

Muhammad Asghar, Dennis Hasselquist, Bengt Hansson, Pavel Zehtindjiev, Helena Westerdahl & Staffan Bensch
Recovery from infection is not always complete, and mild chronic infection may persist. Although the direct costs of such infections are apparently small, the potential for any long-term effects on Darwinian fitness is poorly understood. In a wild population of great reed warblers, we found that low-level chronic malaria infection reduced life span as well as the lifetime number and quality of offspring. These delayed fitness effects of malaria appear to be mediated by telomere...

Data from: Asymmetric isolating barriers between different microclimatic environments caused by low immigrant survival

Thomas P. Gosden, John T. Waller & Erik I. Svensson
Spatially variable selection has the potential to result in local adaptation unless counteracted by gene flow. Therefore, barriers to gene flow will help facilitate divergence between populations that differ in local selection pressures. We performed spatially and temporally replicated reciprocal field transplant experiments between inland and coastal habitats using males of the common blue damselfly (Enallagma cyathigerum) as our study organism. Males from coastal populations had lower local survival rates than resident males at inland...

Data from: Selection on male sex pheromone composition contributes to butterfly reproductive isolation

Paul M. B. Bacquet, Oskar Brattström, Hong-Lei Wang, Cerisse E. Allen, Christer Löfstedt, Paul M. Brakefield, Caroline M. Nieberding, C. Lofstedt, H.- L. Wang & O. Brattstrom
Selection can facilitate diversification by inducing character displacement in mate choice traits that reduce the probability of maladaptive mating between lineages. Although reproductive character displacement (RCD) has been demonstrated in two-taxa case studies, the frequency of this process in nature is still debated. Moreover, studies have focused primarily on visual and acoustic traits, despite the fact that chemical communication is probably the most common means of species recognition. Here, we showed in a large, mostly...

Data from: Water use by Swedish boreal forests in a changing climate

Thomas B. Hasper, Göran Wallin, Shubhangi Lamba, Marianne Hall, Fernando Jaramillo, Hjalmar Laudon, Sune Linder, Jane L. Medhurst, Mats Räntfors, Bjarni D. Sigurdsson & Johan Uddling
The rising levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration ([CO2]) and temperature have the potential to substantially affect the terrestrial water and energy balance by altering the stomatal conductance and transpiration of trees. Many models assume decreases in stomatal conductance and plant water use under rising [CO2], which has been used as a plausible explanation for the positive global trend in river run-off over the past century. Plant water use is, however, also affected by changes...

Data from: Causes and characteristics of reverse bird migration: an analysis based on radar, radio tracking and ringing at Falsterbo, Sweden

Cecila Nilsson, Sissel Sjöberg & Cecilia Nilsson
That birds migrate in the reverse direction of the expected is a phenomenon of regular occurrence which has been observed at many sites. Here we use three different methods; tracking radar, radiotelemetry and ringing, to characterize the flights of these reverse migrants and investigate possible causes of reverse migration of nocturnally migrating passerines during autumn migration at Falsterbo peninsula, Sweden. Using these different methods we investigated both internal factors, such as age and fuel load,...

Data from: Evaluation of two methods for minimally invasive peripheral body temperature measurement in birds

Andreas Nord, Marina Lehmann, Ross Macloed, Dominic J. McCafferty, Ruedi G. Nager, Jan-Åke Nilsson, Barbara Helm & Ross MacLeod
Body temperature (Tb) is a valuable parameter when assessing the physiological state of animals, but its widespread measurement is often constrained by methods that are invasive or require frequent recapture of animals. Alternatives based on automated remote sensing of peripheral Tb show promise, but little is known about their strengths and limitations. We measured peripheral Tb in great tits Parus major with subcutaneously implanted passive integrated transponders (PIT tags) and externally attached radio transmitters to...

Data from: What can aquatic gastropods tell us about phenotypic plasticity? A review and meta-analysis

Paul E. Bourdeau, Roger K. Butlin, Christer Brönmark, Timothy C. Edgell, Jason T. Hoverman & Johan Hollander
There have been few attempts to synthesise the growing body of literature on phenotypic plasticity to reveal patterns and generalities about the extent and magnitude of plastic responses. Here, we conduct a review and meta-analysis of published literature on phenotypic plasticity in aquatic (marine and freshwater) gastropods, a common system for studying plasticity. We identified 96 studies, using pre-determined search terms, published between 1985 and November 2013. The literature was dominated by studies of predator-induced...

Data from: Individual boldness is linked with protective shell shape in aquatic snails

Johan Ahlgren, Ben B. Chapman, P. Anders Nilsson, Christer Brönmark & C. Bronmark
The existence of consistent individual differences in behaviour (‘animal personality’) has been well documented in recent years. However, how such individual variation in behaviour is maintained over evolutionary time is an ongoing conundrum. A well-studied axis of animal personality is individual variation along a bold–shy continuum, where individuals differ consistently in their propensity to take risks. A predation-risk cost to boldness is often assumed, but also that the reproductive benefits associated with boldness lead to...

Data from: Disentangling plant and soil microbial controls on carbon and nitrogen loss in grassland mesocosms

Franciska T. De Vries, Helene Bracht Jorgensen, Katarina Hedlund & Richard D. Bardgett
1. It is well known that plant–soil interactions play an important role in determining the impact of global change phenomena on biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. Little is known, however, about the individual and relative importance for carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycling of non-random changes in plant and soil communities that result from global change phenomena, such as fertilization and agricultural intensification. 2. We set up a field-based mesocosm experiment in which we re-inoculated soil...

Data from: Serial monitoring of circulating tumor DNA in patients with primary breast cancer for detection of occult metastatic disease

Eleonor Olsson, Christof Winter, Anthony George, Yilun Chen, Jillian Howlin, Man‐Hung Eric Tang, Malin Dahlgren, Ralph Schulz, Dorthe Grabau, Danielle Van Westen, Mårten Fernö, Christian Ingvar, Carsten Rose, Pär‐Ola Bendahl, Lisa Rydén, Åke Borg, Sofia K. Gruvberger-Saal, Helena Jernström & Lao H. Saal
Metastatic breast cancer is usually diagnosed after becoming symptomatic, at which point it is rarely curable. Cell‐free circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) contains tumor‐specific chromosomal rearrangements that may be interrogated in blood plasma. We evaluated serial monitoring of ctDNA for earlier detection of metastasis in a retrospective study of 20 patients diagnosed with primary breast cancer and long follow‐up. Using an approach combining low‐coverage whole‐genome sequencing of primary tumors and quantification of tumor‐specific rearrangements in plasma...

Data from: Mutation screening of 1,237 cancer genes across six model cell lines of basal-like breast cancer

Eleonor Olsson, Christof Winter, Anthony George, Yilun Chen, Therese Törngren, Pär-Ola Bendahl, Åke Borg, Sofia K. Gruvberger-Saal & Lao H. Saal
Basal-like breast cancer is an aggressive subtype generally characterized as poor prognosis and lacking the expression of the three most important clinical biomarkers, estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and HER2. Cell lines serve as useful model systems to study cancer biology in vitro and in vivo. We performed mutational profiling of six basal-like breast cancer cell lines (HCC38, HCC1143, HCC1187, HCC1395, HCC1954, and HCC1937) and their matched normal lymphocyte DNA using targeted capture and next-generation sequencing...

Data from: The wake of hovering flight in bats

Jonas Håkansson, Anders Hedenström, York Winter & L. Christoffer Johansson
Hovering means stationary flight at zero net forward speed, which can be achieved by animals through muscle powered flapping flight. Small bats capable of hovering typically do so with a downstroke in an inclined stroke plane, and with an aerodynamically active outer wing during the upstroke. The magnitude and time history of aerodynamic forces should be reflected by vorticity shed into the wake. We thus expect hovering bats to generate a characteristic wake, but this...

Registration Year

  • 2015
    44

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    44

Affiliations

  • Lund University
    44
  • Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences
    6
  • University of Nottingham
    3
  • Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology
    2
  • University of Tasmania
    2
  • University of Gothenburg
    2
  • University of Oslo
    2
  • Purdue University
    2
  • Clark University
    2
  • Technical University of Denmark
    2