3 Works

Data from: The Paleozoic origin of enzymatic lignin decomposition reconstructed from 31 fungal genomes

Dimitrios Floudas, Manfred Binder, Robert Riley, Kerrie Barry, Robert A. Blanchette, Bernard Henrissat, Angel T. Martínez, Robert Ortillar, Joseph W. Spatafora, Jagjit S. Yadav, Andrea Aerts, Isabelle Benoit, Alex Boyd, Alexis Carlson, Alex Copeland, Pedro M. Coutinho, Ronald P. De Vries, Patricia Ferreira, Keisha Findley, Brian Foster, Jill Gaskell, Dylan Glotzer, Paweł Górecki, Joseph Heitman, Cedar Hesse … & David S. Hibbett
Wood is a major pool of organic carbon that is highly resistant to decay, owing largely to the presence of lignin. The only organisms capable of substantial lignin decay are white rot fungi in the Agaricomycetes, which also contains non–lignin-degrading brown rot and ectomycorrhizal species. Comparative analyses of 31 fungal genomes (12 generated for this study) suggest that lignin-degrading peroxidases expanded in the lineage leading to the ancestor of the Agaricomycetes, which is reconstructed as...

Data from: Divergence and biogeography of the recently evolved Macaronesian red Festuca (Gramineae) species inferred from coalescence-based analyses

Antonio J. Díaz-Pérez, Miguel Sequeira, Arnoldo Santos-Guerra & Pilar Catalán
Studying the biogeography and the phylogeography of the endemic Macaronesian red Festuca species (Loliinae, Poaceae) is of prime interest in understanding the speciation and colonization patterns of recently evolved groups in oceanic archipelagos. Coalescence-based analyses of plastid trnLF sequences were employed to estimate evolutionary parameters and to test different species-history scenarios that model the pattern of species divergence. Bayesian IM estimates of species divergence times suggested that ancestral lineages of diploid Macaronesian and Iberian red...

Data from: Genetic footprints of Iberian cattle in America 500 years after the arrival of Columbus

Amparo M. Martínez, Luis T. Gama, Javier Cañón, Catarina Ginja, Juan V. Delgado, Susana Dunner, Vincenzo Landi, Inmaculada Martín-Burriel, M. Cecilia T. Penedo, Clementina Rodellar, Jose Luis Vega-Pla, Atzel Acosta, Luz Ángela Álvarez, Esperanza Camacho, Óscar Cortés, José Ribamar Marques, Óscar Roberto Martínez, Rubén Darío Martínez, Lilia Melucci, Guillermo Martínez-Velázquez, Jose Ernesto Muñoz, Alicia Postiglioni, Jorge Quiroz, Philip Sponenberg, Odalys Uffo … & Ruben D. Martínez
BACKGROUND: American Creole cattle presumably descend from animals imported from the Iberian Peninsula during the period of colonization and settlement, through different migration routes, and may have also suffered the influence of cattle directly imported from Africa. The introduction of European cattle, which began in the 18th century, and later of Zebu from India, has threatened the survival of Creole populations, some of which have nearly disappeared or were admixed with exotic breeds. Assessment of...

Registration Year

  • 2012
    3

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    3

Affiliations

  • University of Zaragoza
    3
  • Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Forestales Agrícolas y Pecuarias
    1
  • Department of Plant Biology
    1
  • Oregon State University
    1
  • University of Minnesota
    1
  • United States Department of Energy
    1
  • University of Lisbon
    1
  • University of Cincinnati
    1
  • University of Göttingen
    1
  • Complutense University of Madrid
    1