47 Works

Data from: Body shrinkage due to Arctic warming reduces red knot fitness in tropical wintering range

Jan A. Van Gils, Simeon Lisovski, Tamar Lok, Włodzimierz Meissner, Agnieszka Ożarowska, Jimmy De Fouw, Eldar Rakhiemberdiev, Mikhail Y. Soloviev, Theunis Piersma & Marcel Klaassen
Reductions in body size are increasingly being identified as a response to climate warming. Here we present evidence for a case of such body shrinkage, potentially due to malnutrition in early life. We show that an avian long-distance migrant (red knot, Calidris canutus canutus), which is experiencing globally unrivaled warming rates at its high-Arctic breeding grounds, produces smaller offspring with shorter bills during summers with early snowmelt. This has consequences half a world away at...

Data from: Delayed dispersal and the costs and benefits of different routes to independent breeding in a cooperatively breeding bird

Sjouke A. Kingma, Kat Bebbington, Martijn Hammers, David S. Richardson & Jan Komdeur
Why sexually mature individuals stay in groups as nonreproductive subordinates is central to the evolution of sociality and cooperative breeding. To understand such delayed dispersal, its costs and benefits need to be compared with those of permanently leaving to float through the population. However, comprehensive comparisons, especially regarding differences in future breeding opportunities, are rare. Moreover, extraterritorial prospecting by philopatric individuals has generally been ignored, even though the factors underlying this route to independent breeding...

Data from: An experimental test of state-behaviour feedbacks: gizzard mass and foraging behaviour in red knots

Kimberley J. Mathot, Anne Dekinga & Theunis Piersma
1. Animals frequently exhibit consistent among-individual differences in behavioural and physiological traits that are inherently flexible. Why should individuals differ consistently in their expression of labile traits? Recently, positive feedbacks between state and behaviour have been proposed as a parsimonious explanation for the maintenance of consistent among-individual differences in both state and behaviour. If state affects behaviour, and behaviour reciprocally affects state, then even chance differences in either state or behaviour that arise among-individuals could...

Data from: Tightly congruent bursts of lineage and phenotypic diversification identified in a continental ant radiation

Shauna L. Price, Rampal S. Etienne & Scott Powell
Adaptive diversification is thought to be shaped by ecological opportunity. A prediction of this ecological process of diversification is that it should result in congruent bursts of lineage and phenotypic diversification, but few studies have found this expected association. Here, we study the relationship between rates of lineage diversification and body size evolution in the turtle ants, a diverse Neotropical clade. Using a near complete, time-calibrated phylogeny we investigated lineage diversification dynamics and body size...

Data from: Stabilising survival selection on pre-senescent expression of a sexual ornament followed by a terminal decline

Mirre Simons, Michael Briga, Simon Verhulst & M. J. P. Simons
Senescence is a decrease in functional capacity, increasing mortality rate with age. Sexual signals indicate functional capacity, because costs of ornamentation ensure signal honesty, and are therefore expected to senesce, tracking physiological deterioration and mortality. For sexual traits, mixed associations with age and positive associations with life expectancy have been reported. However, whether these associations are caused by selective disappearance and/or within-individual senescence of sexual signals, respectively, is not known. We previously reported that zebra...

Data from: Assessment of the broader economic consequences of HPV prevention from a government-perspective: a fiscal analytic approach

Didik Setiawan, Nikolaos Kotsopoulos, Jan C. Wilschut, Maarten J. Postma & Mark P. Connolly
Background. Cervical cancer poses a substantial burden in terms of morbidity, mortality, and economic losses, especially in low/middle-income countries. HPV vaccination and/or cervical cancer screening among females may reduce the burden of HPV-related diseases, including cervical cancer. However, limited funds may impede the implementation of population-based programmes. Governmental investments in the prevention of infectious disease may have broader economic and fiscal benefits, which are not accounted in conventional economic analyses. This study estimates the broader...

Data from: Diet preferences as the cause of individual differences rather than the consequence

Thomas Oudman, Allert I. Bijleveld, Marwa M. Kavelaars, Anne Dekinga, John Cluderay, Theunis Piersma & Jan A. Van Gils
Behavioural variation within a species is usually explained as the consequence of individual variation in physiology. However, new evidence suggests that the arrow of causality may well be in the reverse direction: behaviours such as diet preferences cause the differences in physiological and morphological traits. Recently, diet preferences were proposed to underlie consistent differences in digestive organ mass and movement patterns (patch residence times) in red knots (Calidris canutus islandica). Red knots are molluscivorous and...

Data from: Revisiting the measurement of anomie

Ali Teymoori, Jolanda Jetten, Brock Bastian, Amarina Ariyanto, Frédérique Autin, Nadia Ayub, Constantina Badea, Tomasz Besta, Fabrizio Butera, Rui Costa-Lopes, Lijuan Cui, Carole Fantini, Gillian Finchilesc, Lowell Gaertner, Mario Gollwitzer, Ángel Gómez, Roberto González, Ying Yi Hong, Dorthe Høj Jensen, Minoru Karasawa, Thomas Kessler, Olivier Klein, Marcus Lima, Tuuli Anna Mähönen, Laura Megevand … & Gillian Finchilescu
Sociologists coined the term "anomie" to describe societies that are characterized by disintegration and deregulation. Extending beyond conceptualizations of anomie that conflate the measurements of anomie as 'a state of society' and as a 'state of mind', we disentangle these conceptualizations and develop an analysis and measure of this phenomenon focusing on anomie as a perception of the 'state of society'. We propose that anomie encompasses two dimensions: a perceived breakdown in social fabric (i.e.,...

Data from: Consequences of sibling rivalry vary across life in a passerine bird

Kat Bebbington, Sjouke Anne Kingma, Eleanor A. Fairfield, Lewis G. Spurgin, Jan Komdeur & David S. Richardson
Many studies have assessed the costs of sibling rivalry in systems where offspring always have competitors, but conclusions about sibling rivalry in these species are restricted to interpreting the cost of changes in the relative level of competition and are often complicated by the expression of potentially costly rivalry related traits. Additionally, the majority of studies focus on early-life sibling rivalry, but the costs of competition can also affect later-life performance. We test a suite...

Data from: No effect of partner age and lifespan on female age-specific reproductive performance in blue tits

Seyed Mehdi Amininasab, Martijn Hammers, Oscar Vedder, Jan Komdeur & Peter Korsten
Studies of age-specific reproductive performance are fundamental to our understanding of population dynamics and the evolution of life-history strategies. In species with bi-parental care, reproductive ageing trajectories of either parent may be influenced by their partner's age, but this has rarely been investigated. We investigated within-individual age-specific performance (laying date and number of eggs laid) in wild female blue tits Cyanistes caeruleus and evaluated how the age and longevity of their male partner indirectly influenced...

Data from: Decoupled diversity dynamics in green and brown webs during primary succession in a salt marsh

Maarten Schrama, Fons Van Der Plas, Matty P. Berg & Han Olff
Terrestrial ecosystems are characterized by a strong functional connection between the green (plant–herbivore-based) and brown (detritus–detritivore-based) parts of the food web, which both develop over successional time. However, the interlinked changes in green and brown food web diversity patterns in relation to key ecosystem processes are rarely studied. Here, we demonstrate changes in species richness, diversity and evenness over a wide range of invertebrate green and brown trophic groups during 100 years of primary succession...

Data from: Facultative grazing and bioturbation by macrodetritivores alter saltmarsh plant-plant interactions under stress

Ruth A. Howison, Han Olff, Marinka E. B. Van Puijenbroek & Christian Smit
The importance of positive plant-plant interactions is generally suggested to increase towards more stressful conditions, due to mutual stress amelioration between plants. Bioturbating macrodetritivores can also ameliorate stress through bioturbation, but can also become selective herbivores under food-limited conditions, making the outcome of plant-plant interactions under stress in the presence of macrodetritivores unclear. We studied how combining environmental stress (waterlogging) with the presence of the soil macrodetritivore Orchestia gammarellus affected the outcome of the interaction...

Data from: Sources of (co)variation in alternative siring routes available to male great tits (Parus major)

Yimen G. Araya-Ajoy, Sylvia Kuhn, Kimberley J. Mathot, Alexia Mouchet, Ariane Mutzel, Marion Nicolaus, Jan J. Wijmenga, Bart Kempenaers & Niels J. Dingemanse
Males of socially monogamous species can increase their siring success via within-pair and extra-pair fertilizations. In this study, we focused on the different sources of (co)variation between these siring routes, and asked how each contributes to total siring success. We quantified the fertilization routes to siring success, as well as behaviors that have been hypothesized to affect siring success, over a five-year period for a wild population of great tits Parus major. We considered siring...

Data from: Different-sized grazers have distinctive effects on plant functional composition of an African savannah

Fons Van Der Plas, Ruth A. Howison, Nokukhanya Mpanza, Joris P. G. M. Cromsigt & Han Olff
Grazing ungulates play a key role in many ecosystems worldwide and can form diverse assemblages, such as in African savannahs. In many of these ecosystems, present-day ungulate communities are impoverished subsets of once diverse assemblages. While we know that excluding all ungulates from grasslands can exert major effects on both the structure and composition of the vegetation, how different individual ungulate species may have contrasting effects on grassland communities remains poorly understood. Here, we performed...

Data from: Phylogeographic differentiation versus transcriptomic adaptation to warm temperatures in Zostera marina, a globally important seagrass

Alexander Jueterbock, Susanne U. Franssen, Nina Bergmann, Jenny Gu, James A. Coyer, Thorsten B. H. Reusch, Erich Bornberg-Bauer & Jeanine L. Olsen
Populations distributed across a broad thermal cline are instrumental in addressing adaptation to increasing temperatures under global warming. Using a space-for-time substitution design, we tested for parallel adaptation to warm temperatures along two independent thermal clines in Zostera marina, the most widely distributed seagrass in the temperate Northern Hemisphere. A North–South pair of populations was sampled along the European and North American coasts and exposed to a simulated heatwave in a common-garden mesocosm. Transcriptomic responses...

Data from: Heritable variation in maternally-derived yolk androgens, thyroid hormones and immune factors

Suvi Ruuskanen, Phillip Gienapp, Ton G.G Groothuis, Sonja V. Schaper, Veerle M. Darras, Cheyenne Pereira, Bonnie De Vries & Marcel E. Visser
Maternal reproductive investment can critically influence offspring phenotype, and thus these maternal effects are expected to be under strong natural selection. Knowledge on the extent of heritable variation in the physiological mechanisms underlying maternal effects is however limited. In birds, resource allocation to eggs is a key mechanism for mothers to affect their offspring and different components of the egg may or may not be independently adjusted. We studied the heritability of egg components and...

Data from: The correlation between colouration and exploration behaviour varies across hierarchical levels in a wild passerine bird

Marion Nicolaus, Romain Piault, Richard Ubels, Joost M. Tinbergen & Niels J. Dingemanse
IIn vertebrates, darker individuals are often found to be more active and willing to take risks (representing characteristics of a ‘proactive’ coping style), whereas lighter individuals are instead more cautious and less active (representing characteristics of a ‘reactive’ coping style). It is thus generally expected that melanin-based colouration and proactivity form a suite of positively integrated traits at the among-individual level. Here we use a multi-generational pedigree of free-living great tits (Parus major) to partition...

Data from: Community assembly in Lake Tanganyika cichlid fish: quantifying the contributions of both niche-based and neutral processes

Thijs Janzen, Adriana Alzate, Moritz Muschick, Martine E. Maan, Fons Van Der Plas & Rampal S. Etienne
The cichlid family features some of the most spectacular examples of adaptive radiation. Evolutionary studies have highlighted the importance of both trophic adaptation and sexual selection in cichlid speciation. However, it is poorly understood what processes drive the composition and diversity of local cichlid species assemblages on relatively short, ecological timescales. Here, we investigate the relative importance of niche-based and neutral processes in determining the composition and diversity of cichlid communities inhabiting various environmental conditions...

Data from: Sharp acoustic boundaries across an altitudinal avian hybrid zone despite asymmetric introgression

Wouter Halfwerk, Caroline Dingle, Dusan M. Brinkhuizen, Jelmer W. Poelstra, Jan Komdeur & Hans Slabbekoorn
Birdsong is a sexually selected trait that could play an important evolutionary role when related taxa come into secondary contact. Many songbird species however learn their songs through copying one or more tutors, which complicates the evolutionary outcome of such contact. Two subspecies of a presumed vocal learner, the grey-breasted wood-wren (Henicorhina leucophrys), replace each other altitudinally across the western slope of the Ecuadorian Andes. These subspecies are morphologically very similar, but show striking differences...

Data from: How habitat-modifying organisms structure the food web of two coastal ecosystems

Els M. Van Der Zee, Christine Angelini, Laura L. Govers, Marjolijn J. A. Christianen, Andrew H. Altieri, Karin J. Van Der Reijden, Brian R. Silliman, Johan Van De Koppel, Matthijs Van Der Geest, Jan A. Van Gils, Henk W. Van Der Veer, Theunis Piersma, Peter C. De Ruiter, Han Olff & Tjisse Van Der Heide
The diversity and structure of ecosystems has been found to depend both on trophic interactions in food webs and on other species interactions such as habitat modification and mutualism that form non-trophic interaction networks. However, quantification of the dependencies between these two main interaction networks has remained elusive. In this study, we assessed how habitat-modifying organisms affect basic food web properties by conducting in-depth empirical investigations of two ecosystems: North American temperate fringing marshes and...

Data from: How reliably can we infer diversity-dependent diversification from phylogenies?

Rampal S. Etienne, Alex L. Pigot, Albert Phillimore & Albert B. Phillimore
Slowdowns in lineage accumulation in phylogenies suggest that speciation rates decline as diversity increases. Likelihood methods have been developed to detect such diversity dependence. However, a thorough test of whether such approaches correctly infer diversity dependence is lacking. Here, we simulate phylogenetic branching under linear negative diversity-dependent and diversity-independent models and estimate from the simulated phylogenies the maximum-likelihood parameters for three different conditionings – on survival of the birth–death process given the crown age, on...

Data from: How individual Montagu's Harriers cope with Moreau's Paradox during the Sahelian winter

Almut Ellinor Schlaich, Raymond H. G. Klaassen, Willem Bouten, Vincent Bretagnolle, Ben Johannes Koks, Alexandre Villers & Christiaan Both
Hundreds of millions of Afro-Palaearctic migrants winter in the Sahel, a semi-arid belt south of the Sahara desert, where they experience deteriorating ecological conditions during their overwintering stay and have to prepare for spring migration when conditions are worst. This well-known phenomenon was first described by R.E. Moreau and is known ever since as Moreau's Paradox. However, empirical evidence of the deteriorating seasonal ecological conditions is limited and little is known on how birds respond....

Data from: Ecological forensics: using single point stable isotope values to infer seasonal schedules of animals after two diet switches

Jeltje Jouta, Maurine W. Dietz, Jeroen Reneerkens, Theunis Piersma, Eldar Rakhimberdiev, Gunnar T. Hallgrímsson & Ido Pen
Animals adjust to seasonal challenges in physical, behavioural and spatial ways. Such adjustments are commonly associated with diet changes that often can be characterised isotopically. We introduce the ‘double diet switch model’, with which the occurrence and timing of two subsequent diet switches of an individual animal can be traced with a single sample assayed for stable isotopes. We demonstrate the model for Sanderling, Calidris alba, a small shorebird that migrates from the Nearctic tundra...

Data from: Linking genetic kinship and demographic analyses to characterize dispersal: methods and application to Blanding’s turtle

Brendan N. Reid, Richard P. Thiel, Per J. Palsbøll & Marcus Z. Peery
Characterizing how frequently, and at what life stages and spatial scales, dispersal occurs can be difficult, especially for species with cryptic juvenile periods and long reproductive life spans. Using a combination of mark–recapture information, microsatellite genetic data, and demographic simulations, we characterize natal and breeding dispersal patterns in the long-lived, slow-maturing, and endangered Blanding’s turtle (Emydoidea blandingii), focusing on nesting females. We captured and genotyped 310 individual Blanding’s turtles (including 220 nesting females) in a...

Data from: African departure rather than migration speed determines variation in spring arrival in pied flycatchers

Janne Ouwehand & Christiaan Both
Properly timed spring migration enhances reproduction and survival. Climate change requires organisms to respond to changes such as advanced spring phenology. Pied flycatchers Ficedula hypoleuca have become a model species to study such phenological adaptations of long-distance migratory songbirds to climate change, but data on individuals’ time schedules outside the breeding season are still lacking. Using light-level geolocators, we studied variation in migration schedules across the year in a pied flycatcher population in the Netherlands,...

Registration Year

  • 2016
    47

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    47

Affiliations

  • University of Groningen
    47
  • VU University Amsterdam
    6
  • Utrecht University
    6
  • University of Bern
    5
  • University of East Anglia
    4
  • University of Oxford
    4
  • University of Gdańsk
    2
  • Aarhus University
    2
  • Nederlands Instituut voor Ecologie
    2
  • Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research
    2