38 Works

Data from: Oxidative status and fitness components in the Seychelles warbler

Janske Van De Crommenacker, Martijn Hammers, Jildou Van Der Woude, Marina Louter, Peter Santema, David S. Richardson & Jan Komdeur
Oxidative damage, caused by reactive oxygen species during aerobic respiration, is thought to be an important mediator of life-history trade-offs. To mitigate oxidative damage, antioxidant defence mechanisms are deployed, often at the cost of resource allocation to other body functions. Both reduced resource allocation to body functions and direct oxidative damage may decrease individual fitness, through reducing survival and/or reproductive output. The oxidative costs of reproduction have gained much attention recently, but few studies have...

Data from: Repeatable and heritable behavioural variation in a wild cooperative breeder

Hannah A. Edwards, Terry Burke & Hannah L. Dugdale
Quantifying consistent differences in behaviour among individuals is vital to understanding the ecological and evolutionary significance of animal personality. To quantify personality, the phenotypic variation of a behavioural trait is partitioned to assess how it varies among individuals, which is also known as repeatability. If pedigree data are available, the phenotypic variation can then be further partitioned to estimate the additive genetic variance and heritability. Assessing the repeatability and heritability of personality traits therefore allows...

Data from: No fitness benefits of early molt in a fairy-wren: relaxed sexual selection under genetic monogamy?

Marie Fan, Michelle L. Hall, Sjouke A. Kingma, Lisa M. Mandeltort, Nataly Hidalgo Aranzamendi, Kaspar Delhey & Anne Peters
The evolution of male ornamentation has long been the focus of sexual selection studies. However, evidence is accumulating that sexually selected traits can also be lost, although the process is ill-understood. In male fairy-wrens (Malurus spp.), early molt into the seasonal breeding plumage is critical for obtaining extra-pair paternity (EPP), which reaches very high levels in these socially monogamous songbirds. A notable exception is the purple-crowned fairy-wren, Malurus coronatus, which, like its congeners, breeds cooperatively,...

Data from: Patterns of divergence across the geographic and genomic landscape of a butterfly hybrid zone associated with a climatic gradient

Sean F. Ryan, Michaël C. Fontaine, J. Mark Scriber, Michael E. Pfrender, Shawn T. O'Neil & Jessica J. Hellmann
Hybrid zones are a valuable tool for studying the process of speciation and for identifying the genomic regions undergoing divergence and the ecological (extrinsic) and non-ecological (intrinsic) factors involved. Here, we explored the genomic and geographic landscape of divergence in a hybrid zone between Papilio glaucus and Papilio canadensis. Using a genome scan of 28,417 ddRAD SNPs, we identified genomic regions under possible selection and examined their distribution in the context of previously identified candidate...

Data from: No phenotypic plasticity in nest-site selection in response to extreme flooding events

Liam D. Bailey, Bruno Ens, Christiaan Both, Dik Heg, Kees Oosterbeek & Martijn Van De Pol
Phenotypic plasticity is a crucial mechanism for responding to changes in climatic means, yet we know little about its role in responding to extreme climatic events (ECEs). ECEs may lack the reliable cues necessary for phenotypic plasticity to evolve; however, this has not been empirically tested. We investigated whether behavioural plasticity in nest-site selection allows a long-lived shorebird (Haematopus ostralegus) to respond to flooding. We collected longitudinal nest elevation data on individuals over two decades,...

Data from: Joint care can outweigh costs of nonkin competition in communal breeders

Kat Bebbington, Eleanor A. Fairfield, Lewis G. Spurgin, Sjouke Anne Kingma, Hannah Dugdale, Jan Komdeur & David S. Richardson
Competition between offspring can greatly influence offspring fitness and parental investment decisions, especially in communal breeders where unrelated competitors have less incentive to concede resources. Given the potential for escalated conflict, it remains unclear what mechanisms facilitate the evolution of communal breeding among unrelated females. Resolving this question requires simultaneous consideration of offspring in noncommunal and communal nurseries, but such comparisons are missing. In the Seychelles warbler Acrocephalus sechellensis, we compare nestling pairs from communal...

Data from: Shifts in hatch dates do not provide pied flycatchers with a rapid ontogenetic route to adjust offspring time schedules to climate change

Janne Ouwehand, Claudia Burger & Christiaan Both
1. Environments change rapidly, and it is unclear whether organisms with complex life-styles, such as avian migrants, are able to adjust sufficiently. For understanding human impacts on ecosystem functioning, it is crucial to understand how well, and by which mechanisms species are able to adapt. 2. To improve the understanding of migrants’ ability to adjust their annual timing to climate change, we investigated ontogenetic hatch date effects on adult spring migration timing and female egg...

Data from: A cross-scale trophic cascade from large predatory fish to algae in coastal ecosystems

Serena Donadi, Åsa N. Austin, Ulf Bergström, B. Klemens Eriksson, Joakim P. Hansen, Philip Jacobson, Göran Sundblad, Marin Van Regteren & Johan S. Eklöf
Trophic cascades occur in many ecosystems, but the factors regulating them are still elusive. We suggest that an overlooked factor is that trophic interactions (TIs) are often scale-dependent and possibly interact across spatial scales. To explore the role of spatial scale for trophic cascades, and particularly the occurrence of cross-scale interactions (CSIs), we collected and analysed food-web data from 139 stations across 32 bays in the Baltic Sea. We found evidence of a four-level trophic...

Data from: Photoperiod at the larval stage sets the timing of entire annual program in an herbivorous insect

Lucia Salis, Erik Van Den Hoorn, Domien G. M. Beersma, Roelof A. Hut & Marcel E. Visser
To maximize their fitness, organisms need to synchronize their phenology with the seasonal variation in environmental conditions. Most phenological traits are affected by environmental abiotic cues such as photoperiod, temperature and rainfall. When individuals with complex life-cycles fail to match one of the stages with the favourable environment, these negative conditions experienced may lead to carry-over effects and, thus, influence fitness in subsequent stages. In the winter moth, an herbivorous insect with an annual life-cycle,...

Data from: Genomics meets applied ecology: characterizing habitat quality for sloths in a tropical agroecosystem

Emily D. Fountain, Jung Koo Kang, Douglas J. Tempel, Per J. Palsbøll, Jonathan N. Pauli & M. Zachariah Peery
Understanding how habitat quality in heterogeneous landscapes governs the distribution and fitness of individuals is a fundamental aspect of ecology. While mean individual fitness is generally considered a key to assessing habitat quality, a comprehensive understanding of habitat quality in heterogeneous landscapes requires estimates of dispersal rates among habitat types. The increasing accessibility of genomic approaches, combined with field-based demographic methods, provides novel opportunities for incorporating dispersal estimation into assessments of habitat quality. In this...

Data from: Maternal egg hormones in the mating context: the effect of pair personality

Suvi Ruuskanen, Ton G. G. Groothuis, Alexander T. Baugh, Sonja V. Schaper, Bonnie DeVries, Kees Van Oers & Bonnie De Vries
Animal personality traits emerge developmentally from the interaction of genetic and early environmental factors. Maternal hormones, such as androgens (testosterone, T and androstenedione, A4), transferred to embryos and egg yolks may simultaneously organize multiple behavioural and physiological traits. Whereas previous studies demonstrated an association between the mother's personality and yolk androgen levels, the independent effects of the male partner's personality and pair combination are unknown. We test this association using an ecological model species for...

Data from: Biotically driven vegetation mosaics in grazing ecosystems: the battle between bioturbation and biocompaction

Ruth A. Howison, Han Olff, Johan Van De Koppel & Christian Smit
Grazing ecosystems ranging from the arctic tundra to tropical savannas are often characterized by small-scale mosaics of herbivore-preferred and herbivore-avoided patches, promoting plant biodiversity and resilience. The three leading explanations for bistable patchiness in grazed ecosystems are: i) herbivore-driven nutrient cycling, ii) plant growth-water infiltration feedback under aridity, and iii) irreversible local herbivore-induced abiotic stress (topsoil erosion, salinity). However, these insufficiently explain the high temporal patch dynamics and wide-ranging distribution of grazing mosaics across productive...

Data from: Telomere attrition and growth: a life-history framework and case study in common terns

Oscar Vedder, Simon Verhulst, Christina Bauch & Sandra Bouwhuis
The relationship between growth and age-specific telomere length, as a proxy of somatic state, is increasingly investigated, but observed patterns vary and a predictive framework is lacking. We outline expectations based on the assumption that telomere maintenance is costly and argue that individual heterogeneity in resource acquisition is predicted to lead to positive covariance between growth and telomere length. However, canalization of resource allocation to the trait with a larger effect on fitness, rendering that...

Data from: Early spring phytoplankton dynamics in the western Antarctic Peninsula

Kevin R. Arrigo, Gert L. Van Dijken, Anne-Carlijn Alderkamp, Zachary K. Erickson, Kate M. Lewis, Kate E. Lowry, Hannah L. Joy-Warren, Rob Middag, Janice E. Nash-Arrigo, Virginia Selz, Willem H. Van De Poll & Willem Van De Poll
The Palmer Long-Term Ecological Research program has sampled waters of the western Antarctic Peninsula (wAP) annually each summer since 1990. However, information about the wAP prior to the peak of the phytoplankton bloom in January is sparse. Here we present results from a spring process cruise that sampled the wAP in the early stages of phytoplankton bloom development in 2014. Sea ice concentrations were high on the shelf relative to non-shelf waters, especially toward the...

Data from: Robustness of the approximate likelihood of the protracted speciation model

Camille A. Simonet, Raphaël Scherrer, Artur Rego-Costa, Rampal S. Etienne & C. Simonet
The protracted speciation model presents a realistic and parsimonious explanation for the observed slowdown in lineage accumulation through time, by accounting for the fact that speciation takes time. A method to compute the likelihood for this model given a phylogeny is available and allows estimation of its parameters (rate of initiation of speciation, rate of completion of speciation, and extinction rate) and statistical comparison of this model to other proposed models of diversification. However this...

Data from: Increasing the accuracy and precision of relative telomere length estimates by RT qPCR

Justin R. Eastwood, Ellis Mulder, Simon Verhulst & Anne Peters
Since attrition of telomeres, DNA caps that protect chromosome integrity, is accelerated by various forms of stress, telomere length (TL) has been proposed as an indicator of lifetime accumulated stress. In ecological studies it has been used to provide insights into aging, life-history trade-offs, the costs of reproduction and disease. qPCR is a high throughput and cost effective tool to measure relative TL (rTL) that can be applied to newly-collected and archived ecological samples. However,...

Data from: Male but not female zebra finches with high plasma corticosterone have lower survival

Blanca Jimeno, Michael Briga, Michaela Hau & Simon Verhulst
(1) The glucocorticoid axis is essential for coping with predictable and unpredictable environmental variation. Despite this vital function, attempts to link individual variation in the glucocorticoid axis to survival have yielded mixed results, which may be due to endocrine variation caused by uncontrolled variation in environment and life history traits such as reproductive effort. We therefore studied the link between the glucocorticoid axis and long-term survival using captive non-breeding zebra finches. (2) We quantified the...

Data from: Preoperative characteristics of working-age patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty

Tjerk H. Hylkema, Martin Stevens, Jan Van Beveren, Paul C. Rijk, Hans Peter Van Jonbergen, Reinoud W. Brouwer, Bulstra. Sjoerd K., Sandra Brouwer & Sjoerd K. Bulstra
Objective Total Knee Arthroplasty (TKA) is performed more in working-age (<65 years) patients. Until now, research in this patient population has been conducted mainly among retired (≥65 years) patients. Aim of this study was therefore to describe demographic, physical, psychological and social characteristics of working TKA patients and to subsequently compare these characteristics with retired TKA patients and the general population. Methods A cross-sectional analysis. Preoperative data of 152 working TKA patients was used. These...

Data from: The evolution of costly mate choice against segregation distorters

Andri Manser, Anna K. Lindholm, Franjo J. Weissing & Franz J. Weissing
The evolution of female preference for male genetic quality remains a controversial topic in sexual selection research. One well-known problem, known as the lek paradox, lies in understanding how variation in genetic quality is maintained in spite of natural selection and sexual selection against low-quality alleles. Here, we theoretically investigate a scenario where females pay a direct fitness cost to avoid males carrying an autosomal segregation distorter. We show that preference evolution is greatly facilitated...

Data from: An age-dependent fitness cost of migration? Old trans-Saharan migrating spoonbills breed later than those staying in Europe, and late breeders have lower recruitment

Tamar Lok, Linde Veldhoen, Otto Overdijk, Joost M. Tinbergen & Theunis Piersma
1.Migration is a widespread phenomenon in the animal kingdom. On the basis of the considerable variation that exists between and within species, and even within populations, we may be able to infer the (age- and sex-specific) ecological trade-offs and constraints moulding migration systems from assessments of fitness associated with migration and wintering in different areas. 2.During three consecutive breeding seasons, we compared the reproductive performance (timing of breeding, breeding success, chick body condition and post-fledging...

Data from: Carrion fly-derived DNA metabarcoding is an effective tool for mammal surveys: evidence from a known tropical mammal community

Torrey W. Rodgers, Charles C. Y. Xu, Jacalyn Giacalone, Karen M. Kapheim, Kristin Saltonstall, Marta Vargas, Douglas W. Yu, Panu Somervuo, W. Owen McMillan & Patrick A. Jansen
Metabarcoding of vertebrate DNA derived from carrion flies has been proposed as a promising tool for biodiversity monitoring. To evaluate its efficacy, we conducted metabarcoding surveys of carrion flies on Barro Colorado Island (BCI), Panama, which has a well-known mammal community, and compared our results against diurnal transect counts and camera-trapping. We collected 1084 flies in 29 sampling days, conducted metabarcoding with mammal-specific (16S) and vertebrate-specific (12S) primers, and sequenced amplicons on Illumina MiSeq. For...

Data from: Methods in field chronobiology

Davide Michelangelo Dominoni, Susanne Åkesson, Raymond Klaassen, Kamiel Spoelstra & Martin Bulla
Chronobiological research has seen a continuous development of novel approaches and techniques to measure rhythmicity at different levels of biological organization from locomotor activity (e.g. migratory restlessness) to physiology (e.g. temperature and hormone rhythms, and relatively recently also in genes, proteins and metabolites). However, the methodological advancements in this field have been mostly and sometimes exclusively used only in indoor laboratory settings. In parallel, there has been an unprecedented and rapid improvement in our ability...

Data from: Mixing of porpoise ecotypes in southwestern UK waters revealed by genetic profiling

Michael C. Fontaine, Oliver Thatcher, Nicolas Ray, Sylvain Piry, Andrew Brownlow, Nicholas J. Davison, Paul Jepson, Rob Deaville & Simon J. Goodman
Contact zones between ecotypes are windows for understanding how species may react to climate changes. Here, we analysed the fine-scale genetic and morphological variation in harbour porpoises (Phocoena phocoena) around the UK by genotyping 591 stranded animals at nine microsatellite loci. The data were integrated with a prior study to map at high resolution the contact zone between two previously identified ecotypes meeting in the northern Bay of Biscay. Clustering and spatial analyses revealed that...

Data from: The palaeogenetics of cat dispersal in the ancient world

Claudio Ottoni, Wim Van Neer, Bea De Cupere, Julien Daligault, Silvia Guimaraes, Joris Peters, Nikolai Spassov, Mary E. Prendergast, Nicole Boivin, Arturo Morales-Muñiz, Adrian Bălăşescu, Cornelia Becker, Norbert Benecke, Adina Boroneant, Hijlke Buitenhuis, Jwana Chahoud, Alison Crowther, Laura Llorente, Nina Manaseryan, Hervé Monchot, Vedat Onart, Marta Osypińska, Olivier Putelat, Eréndira M. Quintana Morales, Jacqueline Studer … & Eva-Maria Geigl
The cat has long been important to human societies as a pest-control agent, object of symbolic value and companion animal, but little is known about its domestication process and early anthropogenic dispersal. Here we show, using ancient DNA analysis of geographically and temporally widespread archaeological cat remains, that both the Near Eastern and Egyptian populations of Felis silvestris lybica contributed to the gene pool of the domestic cat at different historical times. While the cat’s...

Data from: Intestinal Ralstonia pickettii augments glucose intolerance in obesity

Shanthadevi Udayappan, Petia Kovatcheva-Datchary, Guido Bakker, Stefan Havik, Hilde Herrema, Patrice Cani, Kristien Bouter, Clara Belzer, Julia J. Witjes, Anne Vrieze, Eleonore Susanne Victoria De Sonnaville, Alice Chaplin, Daniel Van Raalte, Steven Aalvink, Geesje Dallinga-Thie, Hans Heilig, Goran Bergstrom, Suzan Van Der Meij, Bart Van Wagensveld, Joost Hoekstra, Frits Holleman, Erik Stroes, Albert Groen, Fredrik Backhed, Willem De Vos … & Daniel H. Van Raalte
An altered intestinal microbiota composition has been implicated in the pathogenesis of metabolic disease including obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Low grade inflammation, potentially initiated by the intestinal microbiota, has been suggested to be a driving force in the development of insulin resistance in obesity. Here, we report that bacterial DNA is present in mesenteric adipose tissue of obese but otherwise healthy human subjects. Pyrosequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA genes revealed that DNA...

Registration Year

  • 2017
    38

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    38

Affiliations

  • University of Groningen
    38
  • Max Planck Institute for Ornithology
    4
  • Nederlands Instituut voor Ecologie
    4
  • University of Gothenburg
    3
  • University of Leeds
    3
  • University of East Anglia
    3
  • University of Minnesota
    2
  • Monash University
    2
  • French National Centre for Scientific Research
    2
  • Institute of Avian Research
    2