38 Works

Data from: Maternal egg hormones in the mating context: the effect of pair personality

Suvi Ruuskanen, Ton G. G. Groothuis, Alexander T. Baugh, Sonja V. Schaper, Bonnie DeVries, Kees Van Oers & Bonnie De Vries
Animal personality traits emerge developmentally from the interaction of genetic and early environmental factors. Maternal hormones, such as androgens (testosterone, T and androstenedione, A4), transferred to embryos and egg yolks may simultaneously organize multiple behavioural and physiological traits. Whereas previous studies demonstrated an association between the mother's personality and yolk androgen levels, the independent effects of the male partner's personality and pair combination are unknown. We test this association using an ecological model species for...

Data from: Joint care can outweigh costs of nonkin competition in communal breeders

Kat Bebbington, Eleanor A. Fairfield, Lewis G. Spurgin, Sjouke Anne Kingma, Hannah Dugdale, Jan Komdeur & David S. Richardson
Competition between offspring can greatly influence offspring fitness and parental investment decisions, especially in communal breeders where unrelated competitors have less incentive to concede resources. Given the potential for escalated conflict, it remains unclear what mechanisms facilitate the evolution of communal breeding among unrelated females. Resolving this question requires simultaneous consideration of offspring in noncommunal and communal nurseries, but such comparisons are missing. In the Seychelles warbler Acrocephalus sechellensis, we compare nestling pairs from communal...

Data from: Biotically driven vegetation mosaics in grazing ecosystems: the battle between bioturbation and biocompaction

Ruth A. Howison, Han Olff, Johan Van De Koppel & Christian Smit
Grazing ecosystems ranging from the arctic tundra to tropical savannas are often characterized by small-scale mosaics of herbivore-preferred and herbivore-avoided patches, promoting plant biodiversity and resilience. The three leading explanations for bistable patchiness in grazed ecosystems are: i) herbivore-driven nutrient cycling, ii) plant growth-water infiltration feedback under aridity, and iii) irreversible local herbivore-induced abiotic stress (topsoil erosion, salinity). However, these insufficiently explain the high temporal patch dynamics and wide-ranging distribution of grazing mosaics across productive...

Data from: A circannual perspective on daily and total flight distances in a long-distance migratory raptor, the Montagu's harrier, Circus pygargus

Almut E. Schlaich, Willem Bouten, Vincent Bretagnolle, Henning Heldbjerg, Raymond H. G. Klaassen, Iben H. Sørensen, Alexandre Villers & Christiaan Both
Long-distance migrants are particularly recognized for the distances covered on migration, yet little is known about the distances they cover during the rest of the year. GPS-tracks of 29 Montagu's harriers from breeding areas in France, The Netherlands and Denmark showed that harriers fly between 35 653 and 88 049 km yr−1, of which on average only 28.5% is on migration. Mean daily distances during migration were 296 km d−1 in autumn and 252 km...

Data from: Intestinal Ralstonia pickettii augments glucose intolerance in obesity

Shanthadevi Udayappan, Petia Kovatcheva-Datchary, Guido Bakker, Stefan Havik, Hilde Herrema, Patrice Cani, Kristien Bouter, Clara Belzer, Julia J. Witjes, Anne Vrieze, Eleonore Susanne Victoria De Sonnaville, Alice Chaplin, Daniel Van Raalte, Steven Aalvink, Geesje Dallinga-Thie, Hans Heilig, Goran Bergstrom, Suzan Van Der Meij, Bart Van Wagensveld, Joost Hoekstra, Frits Holleman, Erik Stroes, Albert Groen, Fredrik Backhed, Willem De Vos … & Daniel H. Van Raalte
An altered intestinal microbiota composition has been implicated in the pathogenesis of metabolic disease including obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Low grade inflammation, potentially initiated by the intestinal microbiota, has been suggested to be a driving force in the development of insulin resistance in obesity. Here, we report that bacterial DNA is present in mesenteric adipose tissue of obese but otherwise healthy human subjects. Pyrosequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA genes revealed that DNA...

Data from: Methods in field chronobiology

Davide Michelangelo Dominoni, Susanne Åkesson, Raymond Klaassen, Kamiel Spoelstra & Martin Bulla
Chronobiological research has seen a continuous development of novel approaches and techniques to measure rhythmicity at different levels of biological organization from locomotor activity (e.g. migratory restlessness) to physiology (e.g. temperature and hormone rhythms, and relatively recently also in genes, proteins and metabolites). However, the methodological advancements in this field have been mostly and sometimes exclusively used only in indoor laboratory settings. In parallel, there has been an unprecedented and rapid improvement in our ability...

Data from: Evolutionary ecology of beta-lactam gene clusters in animals

Wouter Suring, Karen Meusemann, Alexander Blanke, Janine Marien, Tim Schol, Valeria Agamennone, Anna Faddeeva-Vakhrusheva, Matty P. Berg, , Bram Brouwer, Nico M. Van Straalen, Dick Roelofs & Abraham Brouwer
Beta-lactam biosynthesis was thought to occur only in fungi and bacteria, but we recently reported the presence of isopenicillin N synthase in a soil-dwelling animal, Folsomia candida. However, it has remained unclear whether this gene is part of a larger beta-lactam biosynthesis pathway and how widespread the occurrence of penicillin biosynthesis is among animals. Here, we analyzed the distribution of beta-lactam biosynthesis genes throughout the animal kingdom and identified a beta-lactam gene cluster in the...

Data from: Mixing of porpoise ecotypes in southwestern UK waters revealed by genetic profiling

Michael C. Fontaine, Oliver Thatcher, Nicolas Ray, Sylvain Piry, Andrew Brownlow, Nicholas J. Davison, Paul Jepson, Rob Deaville & Simon J. Goodman
Contact zones between ecotypes are windows for understanding how species may react to climate changes. Here, we analysed the fine-scale genetic and morphological variation in harbour porpoises (Phocoena phocoena) around the UK by genotyping 591 stranded animals at nine microsatellite loci. The data were integrated with a prior study to map at high resolution the contact zone between two previously identified ecotypes meeting in the northern Bay of Biscay. Clustering and spatial analyses revealed that...

Data from: Organizing effects of adverse early-life condition on body mass, compensatory growth and reproduction: experimental studies in rock pigeons

Bin-Yan Hsu, Cor Dijkstra & Ton G. G. Groothuis
Early-life food conditions can have profound impact on adult behavioural performance. In song birds, early-life food conditions affect adult physiology and cognitive performance such as song learning and spatial learning. However, effects on reproductive behaviour other than song, such as visual courtship display, pair formation, and egg laying, which are all important determinants of fitness, received hardly any attention. In this study, rock pigeons Columba livia were raised either in a food ad-libitum or at...

Data from: The palaeogenetics of cat dispersal in the ancient world

Claudio Ottoni, Wim Van Neer, Bea De Cupere, Julien Daligault, Silvia Guimaraes, Joris Peters, Nikolai Spassov, Mary E. Prendergast, Nicole Boivin, Arturo Morales-Muñiz, Adrian Bălăşescu, Cornelia Becker, Norbert Benecke, Adina Boroneant, Hijlke Buitenhuis, Jwana Chahoud, Alison Crowther, Laura Llorente, Nina Manaseryan, Hervé Monchot, Vedat Onart, Marta Osypińska, Olivier Putelat, Eréndira M. Quintana Morales, Jacqueline Studer … & Eva-Maria Geigl
The cat has long been important to human societies as a pest-control agent, object of symbolic value and companion animal, but little is known about its domestication process and early anthropogenic dispersal. Here we show, using ancient DNA analysis of geographically and temporally widespread archaeological cat remains, that both the Near Eastern and Egyptian populations of Felis silvestris lybica contributed to the gene pool of the domestic cat at different historical times. While the cat’s...

Data from: Heterogeneity in individual quality in birds: overall patterns and insights from a study on common terns

Oscar Vedder & Sandra Bouwhuis
While life-history theory predicts a trade-off between reproduction and survival, positive covariance, indicative of heterogeneity in individual quality, is often reported among individuals from natural populations. We review longitudinal studies of wild bird populations that test the relationship between annual reproductive success and lifespan and find the majority to report a positive correlation, while none reports a negative correlation. Heterogeneity in individual quality in resource acquisition, masking resource-based trade-offs, therefore appears to be common in...

Data from: Genetic signatures of variation in population size in a native fungal pathogen after the recent massive plantation of its host tree

Frédéric Labbé, Michael C. Fontaine, Cécile Robin & Cyril Dutech
Historical fluctuations in forests' distribution driven by past climate changes and anthropogenic activities can have large impacts on the demographic history of pathogens that have a long co-evolution history with these host trees. Using a population genetic approach, we investigated that hypothesis by reconstructing the demographic history of Armillaria ostoyae, one of the major pathogens of the maritime pine (Pinus pinaster), in the largest monospecific pine planted forest in Europe (south-western France). Genetic structure analyses...

Data from: Interspecific competition counteracts negative effects of dispersal on adaptation of an arthropod herbivore to a new host

Adriana Alzate Vallejo, Karen Bisschop, Rampal S. Etienne, Dries Bonte & A. Alzate
Dispersal and competition have both been suggested to drive variation in adaptability to a new environment, either positively or negatively. A simultaneous experimental test of both mechanisms is however lacking. Here, we experimentally investigate how population dynamics and local adaptation to a new host plant in a model species, the two-spotted spider mite (Tetranychus urticae), are affected by dispersal from a stock population (no-adapted) and competition with an already adapted spider mite species (Tetranychus evansi)....

Registration Year

  • 2017
    38

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    38

Affiliations

  • University of Groningen
    38
  • Max Planck Institute for Ornithology
    4
  • Nederlands Instituut voor Ecologie
    4
  • University of Gothenburg
    3
  • University of Leeds
    3
  • University of East Anglia
    3
  • University of Minnesota
    2
  • Monash University
    2
  • French National Centre for Scientific Research
    2
  • Institute of Avian Research
    2