33 Works

Data from: Nest survival in year-round breeding tropical Red-capped Larks (Calandrella cinerea) increases with higher nest abundance but decreases with higher invertebrate availability and rainfall

Joseph Mwangi, Henry K. Ndithia, Rosemarie Kentie, Muchane Muchai & B. Irene Tieleman
Nest survival is critical to breeding in birds and plays an important role in life-history evolution and population dynamics. Studies evaluating the proximate factors involved in explaining nest survival and the resulting temporal patterns are biased in favor of temperate regions. Yet, such studies are especially pertinent to the tropics, where nest predation rates are typically high and environmental conditions often allow for year-round breeding. To tease apart the effects of calendar month and year,...

Data from: Social conformity and propagation of information in collective u-turns of fish schools

Valentin Lecheval, Li Jiang, Pierre Tichit, Clément Sire, Charlotte K. Hemelrijk & Guy Theraulaz
Moving animal groups such as schools of fish or flocks of birds often undergo sudden collective changes of their travelling direction as a consequence of stochastic fluctuations in heading of the individuals. However, the mechanisms by which these behavioural fluctuations arise at the individual level and propagate within a group are still unclear. In the present study, we combine an experimental and theoretical approach to investigate spontaneous collective U-turns in groups of rummy-nose tetra (Hemigrammus...

Data from: Body stores persist as fitness correlate in a long-distance migrant released from food constraints

Adriaan M. Dokter, Wimke Fokkema, Steven K. Bekker, Willem Bouten, Barwoldt S. Ebbinge, Gerard Müskens, Han Olff, Henk P. Van Der Jeugd, Bart A. Nolet & Barwolt S Ebbinge
Long-distance migratory birds rely on acquisition of body reserves to fuel their migration and reproduction. Breeding success depends on the amount of body reserve acquired prior to migration, which is thought to increase with access to food at the fuelling site. Here we studied how food abundance during fuelling affected time budgets and reproductive success. In a regime of plenty, we expected that (1) limitations on food harvesting would become lifted, allowing birds to frequently...

Data from: Seasonal differences in baseline innate immune function are better explained by environment than annual cycle stage in a year-round breeding tropical songbird

Chima J. Nwaogu, Will Cresswell, Maaike A. Versteegh & B. Irene Tieleman
1. Seasonal variation in innate immunity is often attributed to either temporal environmental variation or to life history trade-offs that arise from specific annual cycle stages but decoupling them is difficult in natural populations. 2. Here, we effectively decouple seasonal environmental variation from annual cycle stage effects by exploiting cross-seasonal breeding and moult in the tropical Common Bulbul Pycnonotus barbatus. We test how annual cycle stage interacts with a key seasonal environmental variable, rainfall, to...

Data from: Nonadditive effects of consumption in an intertidal macroinvertebrate community are independent of food availability but driven by complementarity effects

Emily M. Van Egmond, Peter M. Van Bodegom, Jurgen R. Van Hal, Richard S.P. Van Logtestijn, Matty P. Berg, Rien Aerts & Richard S. P. Van Logtestijn
Suboptimal environmental conditions are ubiquitous in nature and commonly drive the outcome of biological interactions in community processes. Despite the importance of biological interactions for community processes, knowledge on how species interactions are affected by a limiting resource, e.g. low food availability, remains limited. Here, we tested whether variation in food supply causes non-additive consumption patterns, using the macroinvertebrate community of intertidal sandy beaches as a model system. We quantified isotopically labelled diatom consumption by...

Data from: Diversity in form and function: vertical distribution of soil fauna mediates multidimensional trait variation

Jacintha Ellers, Matty P. Berg, André T.C. Dias, Simone Fontana, Astra Ooms & Marco Moretti
1. It has been widely recognized that species show extensive variation in form and function. Based on species’ attributes they can be positioned along major axes of variation, which are often defined by life history traits, such as number of offspring, age at maturity or generation time. Less emphasis has been given in this respect to tolerance traits, especially to resistance to abiotic stress conditions, which often determine community (dis)assembly and distribution. 2. Soil fauna...

Data from: Reciprocal facilitation between large herbivores and ants in a semi-arid grassland

Xiaofei Li, Zhiwei Zhong, Dirk Sanders, Chris Smit, Deli Wang, Petri Nummi, Yu Zhu, Ling Wang, Hui Zhu, Nazim Hassan & Christian Smit
While positive interactions have been well documented in plant and sessile benthic marine communities, their role in structuring mobile animal communities and underlying mechanisms has been less explored. Using field removal experiments, we demonstrated that a large vertebrate herbivore (cattle; Bos tarurs) and a much smaller invertebrate (ants; Lasius spp.), the two dominant animal taxa in a semi-arid grassland in Northeast China, facilitate each other. Cattle grazing led to higher ant mound abundance compared to...

Data from: Reduced telomere length in offspring of old fathers in a long-lived seabird

Sandra Bouwhuis, Simon Verhulst, Christina Bauch & Oscar Vedder
Evidence for transgenerational effects of senescence, whereby offspring from older parents have a reduced lifetime reproductive success, is increasing. Such effects could arise from compromised germline maintenance in old parents, potentially reflected in reduced telomere length in their offspring. We test the relationship between parental age and offspring early-life telomere length in a natural population of common terns and find a significant negative correlation between paternal age and offspring telomere length. Offspring telomere length is...

Data from: Detecting the dependence of diversification on multiple traits from phylogenetic trees and trait data

Leonel Herrera-Alsina, Paul Van Els & Rampal S. Etienne
Species diversification may be determined by many different variables, including the traits of the diversifying lineages. The State-dependent Speciation and Extinction (SSE) framework contains methods to detect the dependence of diversification on these traits. For the analysis of traits with multiple states, MuSSE (Multiple-States dependent Speciation and Extinction) was developed. However, MuSSE and other state-dependent speciation and extinction models have been shown to yield false positives, because they cannot separate differential diversification rates from dependence...

Data from: Reproductive effort and future parental competitive ability: a nest box removal experiment

Rienk W. Fokkema, Richard Ubels, Christiaan Both, Livia De Felici & Joost M. Tinbergen
The life history trade-off between current- and future reproduction is a theoretically well-established concept. However, empirical evidence for the occurrence of a fitness cost of reproduction is mixed. Evidence indicates that parents only pay a cost of reproduction when local competition is high. In line with this, recent experimental work on a small passerine bird, the Great tit (Parus major) showed that reproductive effort negatively affected the competitive ability of parents, estimated through competition for...

Data from: Subordinate females in the cooperatively breeding Seychelles warbler obtain direct benefits by joining unrelated groups

Frank Groenewoud, Sjouke A. Kingma, Martijn Hammers, Hannah L. Dugdale, Terry Burke, David S. Richardson & Jan Komdeur
1. In many cooperatively breeding animals, a combination of ecological constraints and benefits of philopatry favours offspring taking a subordinate position on the natal territory instead of dispersing to breed independently. However, in many species individuals disperse to a subordinate position in a non-natal group (“subordinate between-group” dispersal), despite losing the kin-selected and nepotistic benefits of remaining in the natal group. It is unclear which social, genetic and ecological factors drive between-group dispersal. 2. We...

Data from: Silver spoon effects of hatching order in an asynchronous hatching bird

Zitan Song, Yuqi Zou, Canshi Hu, Yuanxing Ye, Chao Wang, Baoping Qing, Jan Komdeur & Changqing Ding
The silver spoon hypothesis proposes that individuals which develop under favourable conditions will gain fitness benefits throughout their lifetime. Hatching order may create a considerable size hierarchy within a brood and lead to earlier-hatched nestlings having a competitive advantage over their siblings, which has been illustrated in some studies. However, there have been few explorations into the effect on subsequent generations. Here, using a 15-year-long study, we investigated the long-term fitness consequence of hatching order...

Data from: Detecting local diversity-dependence in diversification

Liang Xu & Rampal S. Etienne
Whether there are ecological limits to species diversification is a hotly debated topic. Molecular phylogenies show slowdowns in lineage accumulation, suggesting that speciation rates decline with increasing diversity. A maximum likelihood method to detect diversity-dependent diversification from phylogenetic branching times exists, but it assumes that diversity-dependence is a global phenomenon and therefore ignores that the underlying species interactions are mostly local, and not all species in the phylogeny co-occur locally. Here, we explore whether this...

Data from: Long-lived rodents reveal signatures of positive selection in genes associated with lifespan

Arne Sahm, Martin Bens, Karol Szafranski, Susanne Holtze, Marco Groth, Matthias Görlach, Cornelis Calkhoven, Christine Müller, Matthias Schwab, Johann Kraus, Hans Armin Kestler, Alessandro Cellerino, Hynek Burda, Thomas Hildebrandt, Philip Dammann & Matthias Platzer
The genetics of lifespan determination is poorly understood. Most research has been done on short-lived animals and it is unclear if these insights can be transferred to long-lived mammals like humans. Some African mole-rats (Bathyergidae) have life expectancies that are multiple times higher than similar sized and phylogenetically closely related rodents. To gain new insights into genetic mechanisms determining mammalian lifespans, we obtained genomic and transcriptomic data from 17 rodent species and scanned eleven evolutionary...

Data from: Contrasting heterozygosity-fitness correlations across life in a long-lived seabird

Coraline Bichet, Oscar Vedder, Hedwig Sauer-Gürth, Peter H. Becker, Michael Wink & Sandra Bouwhuis
Selection is a central force underlying evolutionary change and can vary in strength and direction, for example across time and space. The fitness consequences of individual genetic diversity have often been investigated by testing for multi-locus heterozygosity-fitness correlations (HFCs), but few studies have been able to assess HFCs across life stages and in both sexes. Here, we test for HFCs using a 26-year longitudinal individual-based dataset from a large population of a long-lived seabird (the...

Data from: Generational shift in spring staging site use by a long-distance migratory bird

Mo A. Verhoeven, Jelle A.H. Loonstra, Jos C.E.W. Hooijmeijer, Jose A. Masero, Theunis Piersma, Nathan R. Senner, Jos C. E. W. Hooijmeijer & A. H. Jelle Loonstra
In response to environmental change, species have been observed altering their migratory behaviours. Few studies, however, have been able to determine whether these alterations resulted from inherited, plastic, or flexible changes. Here we present a unique observation of a rapid population-level shift in migratory routes — over 300 km from Spain to Portugal — by continental black-tailed godwits Limosa limosa limosa. This shift did not result from adult godwits changing staging sites, as adult site...

Data from: Canalisation in the wild: effects of developmental conditions on physiological traits are inversely linked to their association with fitness

Jelle J. Boonekamp, Ellis Mulder & Simon Verhulst
Ecological conditions affect fitness, but mechanisms causing such effects are not well known, while evolved responses to environmental variation may depend on the underlying mechanisms. Consequences of environmental conditions vary strongly between traits, but a framework to interpret such variation is lacking. We propose that variation in trait response may be explained by differential canalisation, with traits with larger fitness effects showing weaker responses to environmental perturbations due to preferential resource allocation to such traits....

Data from: From ornament to armament or loss of function? Breeding plumage acquisition in a genetically monogamous bird

Marie Fan, Niki Teunissen, Michelle L. Hall, Nataly Hidalgo Aranzamendi, Sjouke A. Kingma, Michael Roast, Kaspar Delhey & Anne Peters
1. The evolution of conspicuous male traits is thought to be driven by female mate choice or male-male competition. These two mechanisms are often viewed as distinct processes, with most studies focusing on female choice. 2. However, both mechanisms of sexual selection can act simultaneously on the same trait (i.e. dual function) and/or interact in a synergistic or conflicting way. Dual function-traits are commonly assumed to originate through male-male competition before being used in female...

Data from: Using molecular phylogenies in island biogeography: it’s about time

Luis Valente, Albert B. Phillimore & Rampal S. Etienne
Island biogeography aims at inferring the processes that govern the assembly of communities in space and time. Molecular phylogenies can tell us about the timings of island colonisations and diversification, but have rarely been used for the estimation of colonisation, speciation and extinction rates on islands. In this study we illustrate the effects of including phylogenetic information with the Galápagos avifauna. We find that by including colonisation times we obtain much more precise and accurate...

Data from: Functional diversity of Collembola is reduced in soils subjected to short-term, but not long-term, geothermal warming

Martin Holmstrup, Bodil K. Ehlers, Stine Slotsbo, Krassimira Ilieva-Makulec, Bjarni Diðrik Sigurðsson, Niki I. Leblans, Jacintha Ellers, Matty P. Berg, Niki I. W. Leblans & Bjarni D. Sigurdsson
1. Human activities have caused global changes of atmospheric chemistry resulting in increased temperature especially in the colder regions of the northern hemisphere. Since warming of the environment can have drastic effects on terrestrial ecosystems it is important to experimentally evaluate the extent of such effects in long-term field-based experiments. In the present study we make use of both recent (short-term) and long-term geothermal warming of Icelandic soils to examine the responses of Collembola, an...

Data from: Factors associated with leucism in the common blackbird (Turdus merula)

Lucía Izquierdo, Robert L. Thomson, José I. Aguirre, Alazne Díez-Fernández, Bruno Faivre, Jordi Figuerola & Juan Diego Ibáñez-Álamo
Leucism is the total or partial lack of melanins in the skin and associate structures (i.e. hair or feathers). Little is known about the factors influencing this chromatic aberration although some local studies suggest that there is an effect of habitat, age and sex. To test these hypotheses and expand our knowledge on leucism, we carried out a large‐scale study using common blackbirds (Turdus merula) as our model species. Given the poor information available on...

Data from: Incorporating non-equilibrium dynamics into demographic history inferences of a migratory marine species

Emma L. Carroll, Rachael Alderman, John L. Bannister, Martine Bérubé, Peter B. Best, Laura Boren, C. Scott Baker, Rochelle Constantine, Ken Findlay, Robert Harcourt, Louisiane Lemaire, Per J. Palsbøll, Nathalie J. Patenaude, Victoria J. Rowntree, Jon Seger, Debbie Steel, Luciano O. Valenzuela, Mandy Watson & Oscar E. Gaggiotti
Understanding how dispersal and gene flow link geographically separated populations over evolutionary history is challenging, particularly in migratory marine species. In southern right whales (SRWs, Eubalaena australis), patterns of genetic diversity are likely influenced by the glacial climate cycle and recent history of whaling. Here we use a dataset of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequences (n=1,327) and nuclear markers (17 microsatellite loci, n=222) from major wintering grounds to investigate circumpolar population structure, historical demography, and effective...

Data from: More than kin: subordinates foster strong bonds with relatives and potential mates in a social bird

Niki Teunissen, Sjouke Anne Kingma, Michelle L. Hall, Nataly Hidalgo Aranzamendi, Jan Komdeur & Anne Peters
Social interactions shape relationships between individuals in complex societies. Affiliative interactions are associated with benefits and strengthen social bonds, while aggressive interactions are costly and negatively affect social bonds. Individuals may attempt to reduce aggressive encounters through submissive displays directed at higher-ranking individuals. Thus, fine-scale patterns of affiliative, aggressive and submissive interactions may reflect costly and beneficial social relationships within groups, providing insight into the benefits of group living and the mechanisms of conflict resolution....

Data from: Inferring diversification rate variation from phylogenies with fossils

Jonathan S. Mitchell, Rampal S. Etienne & Daniel L. Rabosky
Time-calibrated phylogenies of living species have been widely used to study the tempo and mode of species diversification. However, it is increasingly clear that inferences about species diversification — extinction rates in particular — can be unreliable in the absence of paleontological data. We introduce a general framework based on the fossilized birth-death process for studying speciation-extinction dynamics on phylogenies of extant and extinct species. Our model assumes that phylogenies can be modeled as a...

Data from: Incomplete datasets obscure associations between traits affecting dispersal ability and geographic range size of reef fishes in the Tropical Eastern Pacific

Adriana Alzate, Fons Van Der Plas, Fernando A. Zapata, Dries Bonte & Rampal S. Etienne
Dispersal is thought to be an important process determining range size, especially for species in highly spatially structured habitats, such as tropical reef fishes. Despite intensive research efforts, there is conflicting evidence about the role of dispersal on determining range size. We hypothesize that traits related to dispersal drive range sizes, but that complete and comprehensive datasets are essential for detecting relationships between species’ dispersal ability and range size. We investigate the roles of six...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    33

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    33

Affiliations

  • University of Groningen
    33
  • VU University Amsterdam
    3
  • University of Melbourne
    3
  • Monash University
    3
  • Max Planck Institute for Ornithology
    2
  • Nederlands Instituut voor Ecologie
    2
  • University of St Andrews
    2
  • Institute of Avian Research
    2
  • University of Amsterdam
    2
  • Wageningen University & Research
    2