32 Works

Data from: Reciprocal facilitation between annual plants and burrowing crabs: implications for the restoration of degraded salt marshes

Dongdong Qiu, Baoshan Cui, Xu Ma, Jiaguo Yan, Yanzi Cai, Tian Xie, Fang Gao, Fangfang Wang, Haochen Sui, Junhong Bai, Johan Van De Koppel & Han Olff
​​​​​​Increasing evidence shows that facilitative interactions between species play an essential role in coastal wetland ecosystems. However, there is a lack of understanding of how such interactions can be used for restoration purposes in salt marsh ecosystems. We, therefore, studied the mechanisms of reciprocal facilitative interactions between native annual plants, Suaeda salsa, and burrowing crabs, Helice tientsinensis, in a middle-elevation salt marsh (with generally high plant density and moderate tides) in the Yellow River Delta...

Density-dependent individual variation in male attractiveness in a wild field cricket

Petri Niemelä, Stefano Tiso & Niels Dingemanse
Social environments modify a male’s ability to attract females and thus affect its fitness. Theory implies that an individual’s fitness should trade-off with its ability to cope with competition. Individuals are expected to solve this trade-off differently: some males should be more attractive at low but others instead at high density. This prediction has rarely been tested in the wild. We used an automated RFID-surveillance system to quantify for each hour of the day, over...

Data for: Telomere dynamics in relation to experimentally increased locomotion costs and fitness in great tits

Simon Verhulst, Els Atema & Arie J. Van Noordwijk
Evidence that telomere length (TL) and dynamics can be interpreted as proxy for ‘life stress’ experienced by individuals stems largely from correlational studies. We tested for effects of an experimental increase of workload on telomere dynamics by equipping male great tits (Parus major) with a 0.9 gram backpack for a full year. In addition, we analysed associations between natural life-history variation, TL and TL dynamics. Carrying 5% extra weight for a year did not significantly...

Timing of increased temperature sensitivity coincides with nervous system development in winter moth embryos

Natalie Van Dis, Maurijn Van Der Zee, Roelof Hut, Bregje Wertheim & Marcel Visser
Climate change is rapidly altering the environment and many species will need to genetically adapt their seasonal timing to keep up with these changes. Insect development rate is largely influenced by temperature, but we know little about the mechanisms underlying temperature sensitivity of development. Here we investigate seasonal timing of egg hatching in the winter moth, one of the few species which has been found to genetically adapt to climate change, likely through selection on...

Early‐life seasonal, weather and social effects on telomere length in a wild mammal

Sil H.J. Van Lieshout, Elisa P. Badás, Julius G. Bright Ross, Amanda Bretman, Chris Newman, Christina D. Buesching, Terry Burke, David W. Macdonald & Hannah L. Dugdale
Early-life environmental conditions can provide a source of individual variation in life-history strategies and senescence patterns. Conditions experienced in early life can be quantified by measuring telomere length, which can act as a biomarker of survival probability in some species. Here, we investigate whether seasonal changes, weather conditions, and group size are associated with early-life and/or early-adulthood telomere length in a wild population of European badgers (Meles meles). We found substantial intra-annual changes in telomere...

Data and code for Heterogeneous selection on exploration behavior within and among West European populations of a passerine bird

Alexia Mouchet, Ella Cole, Erik Matthysen, Marion Nicolaus, John Quinn, Allison Roth, Joost Tinbergen, Kees Van Oers, Thijs Van Overveld & Niels Dingemanse
Heterogeneous selection is often proposed as a key mechanism maintaining repeatable behavioral variation (“animal personality”) in wild populations. Previous studies largely focused on temporal variation in selection within single populations. The relative importance of spatial versus temporal variation remains unexplored, despite these processes having distinct effects on local adaptation. Using data from >3500 great tits (Parus major) and 35 nest box plots situated within five West-European populations monitored over 4-18 years, we show that selection...

Data from: DNA metabarcoding successfully quantifies relative abundances of arthropod taxa in songbird diets

Yvonne Verkuil
1. Ecological research is often hampered by the inability to quantify animal diets. Large-scale changes in arthropod diversity, abundance and phenologies urge the need to understand the consequences for trophic interactions. Diet composition of insectivorous predators can be tracked through DNA metabarcoding of faecal samples, but to validate the quantitative accuracy of metabarcoding, validation using free-living animals for which their diet can be approximated, is needed. 2. This validation study assesses the use of DNA...

How fitness consequences of early-life conditions vary with age in a long-lived seabird: a Bayesian multivariate analysis of age-specific reproductive values

Oscar Vedder, Ido Pen & Sandra Bouwhuis
Evolutionary theory suggests that individuals can benefit from deferring the fitness cost of developing under poor conditions to later in life. Although empirical evidence for delayed fitness costs of poor developmental conditions is abundant, individuals that die prematurely have not often been incorporated when estimating fitness, such that age-specific fitness costs, and therefore the relative importance of delayed fitness costs is actually unknown. We developed a Bayesian statistical framework to estimate age-specific reproductive values in...

Data for: Parasitoids indicate major climate-induced shifts in Arctic communities

Tuomas Kankaanpää, Eero Vesterinen, Bess Hardwick, Niels Martin Martin Schmidt, Tommi Andersson, Paul Eric Aspholm, Isabel Barrio, Niklas Beckers, Joël Bêty, Tone Birkemoe, Melissa DeSiervo, Katherine Drotos, Dorothee Ehrich, Olivier Gilg, Vladimir Gilg, Nils Hein, Toke Høye, Kristian Jakobsen, Camille Jodouin, Jesse Jorna, Mikhail Kozlov, Jean-Claude Kresse, Don-Jean Leandri-Breton, Nicolas Lecomte, Maia Olsen … & Tomas Roslin
Climatic impacts are especially pronounced in the Arctic, which as a region is warming twice as fast as the rest of the globe. Here, we investigate how mean climatic conditions and rates of climatic change impact parasitoid insect communities in 16 localities across the Arctic. We focus on parasitoids in a wide-spread habitat, Dryas heathlands, and describe parasitoid community composition in terms of larval host use (i.e. parasitoid use of herbivorous Lepidoptera versus pollinating Diptera)...

Individual-based simulations of genome evolution and ancestry: the GENOMEADMIXR R package

Thijs Janzen & Fernando Diaz
Hybridization between populations or species results in a mosaic of the two parental genomes. This and other types of genome admixture have received increasing attention for their implications in speciation, human evolution, Evolve and Resequence (E&R) and genetic mapping. However, a thorough understanding of how local ancestry changes after admixture, and how selection affects patterns of local ancestry remains elusive. The complexity of these questions limits analytical treatment, but these scenarios are specifically suitable for...

Data from: Socio-ecological conditions and female infidelity in the Seychelles warbler

Sara Raj Pant, Jan Komdeur, Terry A. Burke, Hannah L. Dugdale & David S. Richardson
Within socially monogamous breeding systems, levels of extra-pair paternity can vary not only between species, populations and individuals, but also across time. Uncovering how different extrinsic conditions (ecological, demographic and social) influence this behavior will help shed light on the factors driving its evolution. Here, we simultaneously address multiple socio-ecological conditions potentially influencing female infidelity in a natural population of the cooperatively breeding Seychelles warbler, Acrocephalus sechellensis. Our contained study population has been monitored for...

Nucleotide substitutions during speciation may explain substitution rate variation

Thijs Janzen
Although molecular mechanisms associated with the generation of mutations are highly conserved across taxa, there is widespread variation in mutation rates between evolutionary lineages. When phylogenies are reconstructed based on nucleotide sequences, such variation is typically accounted for by the assumption of a relaxed molecular clock, which is just a statistical distribution of mutation rates without much underlying biological mechanism. Here, we propose that variation in accumulated mutations may be partly explained by an elevated...

Helpers compensate for age-related declines in parental care and offspring survival in a cooperatively breeding bird

Martijn Hammers, Sjouke Kingma, Lotte Van Boheemen, Alexandra Sparks, Terry Burke, Hannah Dugdale, David Richardson & Jan Komdeur
Offspring from elderly parents often have lower survival due to parental senescence. In cooperatively breeding species, where offspring care is shared between breeders and helpers, the alloparental care provided by helpers is predicted to mitigate the impact of parental senescence on offspring provisioning and, subsequently, offspring survival. We test this prediction using data from a long-term study on cooperatively breeding Seychelles warblers (Acrocephalus sechellensis). We find that the nestling-provisioning rate of female breeders declines with...

Estimating the time since admixture from phased and unphased molecular data

Thijs Janzen
After admixture, recombination breaks down genomic blocks of contiguous ancestry. The breakdown of these blocks forms a new `molecular clock', that ticks at a much faster rate than the mutation clock, enabling accurate dating of admixture events in the recent past. However, existing theory on the break down of these blocks, or the accumulation of delineations between blocks, so called `junctions', has mostly been limited to using regularly spaced markers on phased data. Here, we...

Data from: Telomere heritability and parental age at conception effects in a wild avian population

Alexandra Sparks, Lewis Spurgin, Marco Van Der Velde, Eleanor Fairfield, Jan Komdeur, Terry Burke, David Richardson & Hannah Dugdale
Individual variation in telomere length is predictive of health and mortality risk across a range of species. However, the relative influence of environmental and genetic variation on individual telomere length in wild populations remains poorly understood. Heritability of telomere length has primarily been calculated using parent–offspring regression which can be confounded by shared environments. To control for confounding variables, quantitative genetic ‘animal models’ can be used, but few studies have applied animal models in wild...

Artificial selection for non‐reproductive host killing in a native parasitoid on the invasive pest, Drosophila suzukii

A. Kruitwagen, B. Wertheim & L.W. Beukeboom
Establishment and spread of invasive species can be facilitated by lack of natural enemies in the invaded area. Host-range evolution of natural enemies augments their ability to reduce the impact of the invader and could enhance their value for biological control. We assessed the potential of the Drosophila parasitoid, Leptopilina heterotoma (Hymenoptera: Figitidae), to exploit the invasive pest Drosophila suzukii by focussing on three performance indices: (1) attack rate (2) host killing, consisting of killing...

Enhancing ecological integrity while preserving ecosystem services: constructing soft-sediment islands in a shallow lake

Casper Van Leeuwen, Ralph Temmink, Hui Jin, Yvonne Kahlert, Bjorn Robroek, Matty Berg, Leon Lamers, Marloes Van Den Akker, Roel Posthoorn, Annemiek Boosten, Han Olff &
1. Ecosystems are increasingly managed to provide multiple benefits to humans, which often degrades their ecological integrity. This strongly applies to aquatic ecosystems, in which engineering can enhance flood protection, drinking water supply, fisheries and recreation. Although these activities typically increase ecosystem functionality to humans, they often impair key aspects of biodiversity and natural functioning. 2. Classical restoration of such degrading freshwater ecosystems can lead to societal opposition, if returning to a former ecosystem state...

Genomic analysis finds no evidence of canonical eukaryotic DNA processing complexes in a free-living protist

Dayana Salas-Leiva, Eelco Tromer, Bruce Curtis, Jon Jerlström-Hultqvist, Martin Kolisko, Zhenzhen Yi, Joan Salas-Leiva, Lucie Gallot-Lavallée, Shelby Williams, Geert Kops, John Archibald, Alastair Simpson & Andrew Roger
Cells replicate and segregate their DNA with precision. Previous studies showed that these regulated cell-cycle processes were present in the last eukaryotic common ancestor and that their core molecular parts are conserved across eukaryotes. However, some metamonad parasites have secondarily lost components of the DNA processing and segregation apparatuses. To clarify the evolutionary history of these systems in these unusual eukaryotes, we generated a genome assembly for the free-living metamonad Carpediemonas membranifera and carried out...

Habitat fragmentation induces rapid phenotypic divergence of migratory and isolated sticklebacks

Aparajitha Ramesh, Ton Groothuis, Franz Weissing & Marion Nicolaus
The adaptive capacity of many organisms is seriously challenged by human-imposed environmental change, which currently happens at unprecedented rates and magnitudes. For migratory fish, habitat fragmentation is a major challenge that can compromise their survival and reproduction. Therefore, it is important to study if fish populations can adapt to such modifications of their habitat. Here, we study whether originally anadromous three-spined stickleback populations (Gasterosteus aculeatus; ‘migrants’) changed in behavior and morphology in response to human-induced...

Structural equation modeling reveals determinants of fitness in a cooperatively breeding bird

Michela Busana, Franz J Weissing, Martijn Hammers, Joke Bakker, Hannah L Dugdale, Sara Raj Pant, David S Richardson, Terrence A Burke & Jan Komdeur
Even in well-studied organisms, it is often challenging to uncover the social and environmental determinants of fitness. Typically, fitness is determined by a variety of factors that act in concert, thus forming complex networks of causal relationships. Moreover, even strong correlations between social and environmental conditions and fitness components may not be indicative of direct causal links, as the measured variables may be driven by unmeasured (or unmeasurable) causal factors. Standard statistical approaches, like multiple...

Data from: High heritability of telomere length and low heritability of telomere shortening in wild birds

Christina Bauch, Jelle J. Boonekamp, Peter Korsten, Ellis Mulder & Simon Verhulst
Telomere length and telomere shortening predict survival in many organisms. This raises the question of the contribution of genetic and environmental effects to variation in these traits, which is still poorly known, particularly for telomere shortening. We used experimental (cross-fostering) and statistical (quantitative genetic ‘animal’ models) means to disentangle and estimate genetic and environmental contributions to telomere length variation in pedigreed free-living jackdaws (Corvus monedula). Telomere length was measured twice in nestlings, at ages 4...

Detecting purging of inbreeding depression by a slow rate of inbreeding for various traits: the impact of environmental and experimental conditions

Mads Fristrup Schou, Jørgen Bundgaard, Volker Loeschcke &
Inbreeding depression (ID) has since long been recognized as a significant factor in evolutionary biology. It is mainly the consequence of (partially) recessive deleterious mutations maintained by mutation-selection balance in large random mating populations. When population size is reduced, recessive alleles are increasingly found in homozygous condition due to drift and inbreeding and become more prone to selection. Particularly at slow rates of drift and inbreeding, selection will be more effective in purging such alleles,...

Feather iridescence of Coeligena hummingbird species varies due to differently organized barbs and barbules

Marco Giraldo, Juliana Sosa & Doekele Stavenga
Hummingbirds are perhaps the most exquisite bird species because of their prominent iridescence, created by stacks of melanosomes in the feather barbules. The feather colours crucially depend on the nanoscopic dimensions of the melanosome, and the displayed iridescence can distinctly vary, dependent on the spatial organization of the barbs and barbules. We have taken the genus Coeligena as a model group, with species having feathers that strongly vary in their spatial reflection properties. We studied...

Data from: Mosaic metabolic ageing: Basal and standard metabolic rate age in opposite directions and independent of environmental quality, sex and lifespan in a passerine

Michael Briga & Simon Verhulst
1. Crucial to our understanding of the ageing process is identifying how traits change with age, which variables alter their ageing process and how these traits associate with fitness. 2. Here we investigated metabolic ageing in outdoor-living captive zebra finches experiencing foraging costs. We longitudinally monitored 407 individuals over six years and collected 3213 measurements of two independent mass-adjusted metabolic traits: basal metabolic rate (BMRm) at thermoneutral temperatures and standard metabolic rate (SMRm), measured as...

Exploration speed in captivity predicts foraging tactics and diet in free-living red knots

Selin Ersoy, Christine Beardsworth, Anne Dekinga, Marcel Van Der Meer, Theunis Piersma, Ton Groothuis & Allert Bijleveld
Variation in foraging tactics and diet are usually attributed to differences in morphology, experience, and prey availability. Recently, consistent individual differences in behaviour (personality) have been shown to be associated with foraging strategies. Bolder or more exploratory individuals are predicted to have a faster pace-of-life and offset the costs of moving more or in risky areas, with higher energetic gains by encountering profitable foraging opportunities and prey. However, the relationship between personality, foraging, and diet...

Registration Year

  • 2021
    32

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    32

Affiliations

  • University of Groningen
    32
  • University of Sheffield
    7
  • University of East Anglia
    6
  • University of Leeds
    4
  • Netherlands Institute of Ecology
    3
  • VU University Amsterdam
    2
  • University of Glasgow
    2
  • Aarhus University
    2
  • Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research
    2
  • University of Helsinki
    2