29 Works

Data from: Additive genetic variance and developmental plasticity in growth trajectories in a wild cooperative mammal

Elise Huchard, Anne Charmantier, Sinead English, Andrew Bateman, Johanna F. Nielsen & Tim Clutton-Brock
Individual variation in growth is high in cooperative breeders and may reflect plastic divergence in developmental trajectories leading to breeding vs. helping phenotypes. However, the relative importance of additive genetic variance and developmental plasticity in shaping growth trajectories is largely unknown in cooperative vertebrates. This study exploits weekly sequences of body mass from birth to adulthood to investigate sources of variance in, and covariance between, early and later growth in wild meerkats (Suricata suricatta), a...

Data from: Integrating influenza antigenic dynamics with molecular evolution

Trevor Bedford, Marc A. Suchard, Philippe Lemey, Gytis Dudas, Victoria Gregory, Alan J. Hay, John W. McCauley, Colin A. Russell, Derek J. Smith & Andrew Rambaut
Influenza viruses undergo continual antigenic evolution allowing mutant viruses to evade host immunity acquired to previous virus strains. Antigenic phenotype is often assessed through pairwise measurement of cross-reactivity between influenza strains using the hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay. Here, we extend previous approaches to antigenic cartography, and simultaneously characterize antigenic and genetic evolution by modeling the diffusion of antigenic phenotype over a shared virus phylogeny. Using HI data from influenza lineages A/H3N2, A/H1N1, B/Victoria and B/Yamagata,...

Data from: Cooperative personalities and social niche specialisation in female meerkats

Alecia J. Carter, Sinead English & Tim H. Clutton-Brock
The social niche specialization hypothesis predicts that group-living animals should specialize in particular social roles to avoid social conflict, resulting in alternative life-history strategies for different roles. Social niche specialization, coupled with role-specific life-history trade-offs, should thus generate between-individual differences in behaviour that persist through time, or distinct personalities, as individuals specialize in particular nonoverlapping social roles. We tested for support for the social niche specialization hypothesis in cooperative personality traits in wild female meerkats...

Data from: Maternal effects and warning signal honesty in eggs and offspring of an aposematic ladybird beetle

Anne E. Winters, Martin Stevens, Chris Mitchell, Simon P. Blomberg & Jonathan D. Blount
1. The eggs of oviparous species are often subject to intense predation pressure. One parental strategy to deter predators is to produce eggs that are laced with noxious chemicals and are conspicuously coloured (i.e. aposematism). 2. Ladybird eggs are conspicuously coloured and contain alkaloids; these traits are believed to function in concert as visual signal and chemical defence, respectively, to deter predators. However, it remains unclear whether such aposematic signals reveal the strength (rather than...

Registration Year

  • 2014
    29

Resource Types

  • Dataset
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Affiliations

  • University of Cambridge
    29
  • University of Exeter
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  • French National Centre for Scientific Research
    4
  • University of Edinburgh
    2
  • Leiden University
    2
  • University of St Andrews
    2
  • University of Cape Town
    2
  • Zoological Society of London
    2
  • Wageningen University & Research
    2
  • University of Oxford
    2