64 Works

Data from: Developmental plasticity for male secondary sexual traits in a group of polyphenic tropical butterflies

Andrew J. Balmer, Paul M. Brakefield, Oskar Brattström & Erik Van Bergen
Many organisms alter their investment in secondary sexual traits to optimise the fitness trade-off between reproduction and survival. Though seasonal variation in the expression of sexual traits is evident (e.g. conspicuous breeding plumage in birds), little attention has been given to short-lived organisms that inhabit relatively stable environments throughout their own lifetime but are exposed to strong environmental variation across generations. Some insects have evolved seasonal polyphenism to cope with intergenerational variation in environmental selection,...

Data from: Cambrian petalonamid Stromatoveris phylogenetically links Ediacaran biota to later animals

Jennifer Hoyal Cuthill, Jian Han & Jennifer F. Hoyal Cuthill
Macro-organisms of the Ediacaran period (635-541 Ma) were large and morphologically complex, with some living in aphotic habitats, presenting the possibility that they were early animals. However, ‘bizarre’ Ediacaran morphologies and mouldic preservation have frustrated comparison to later taxa. Consequently, both the positions of Ediacaran biota in the tree of life and the origins of the Metazoa have been unresolved. Here we provide phylogenetic evidence to identify Ediacaran macro-biota as animals, based on 206 new...

Data from: Sexually dimorphic gene expression and transcriptome evolution provides mixed evidence for a fast‐Z effect in Heliconius

Ana Pinharanda, Marjolaine Rousselle, Simon H. Martin, Joseph J. Hanly, John W. Davey, Sujai Kumar, Nicolas Galtier & Chris D. Jiggins
Sex chromosomes have different evolutionary properties compared to autosomes due to their hemizygous nature. In particular, recessive mutations are more readily exposed to selection, which can lead to faster rates of molecular evolution. Here, we report patterns of gene expression and molecular evolution for a group of butterflies. First, we improve the completeness of the Heliconius melpomene reference annotation, a neotropical butterfly with a ZW sex determination system. Then, we analyse RNA from male and...

Data from: Coadapted genomes and selection on hybrids: Fisher's geometric model explains a variety of empirical patterns

Alexis Simon, Nicolas Bierne & John J. Welch
Natural selection plays a variety of roles in hybridization, speciation and admixture. Most research has focused on two extreme cases: crosses between closely-related inbred lines, where hybrids are fitter than their parents, or crosses between effectively isolated species, where hybrids suffer severe breakdown. But many natural populations must fall into intermediate regimes, with multiple types of gene interaction, and these are more difficult to study. Here, we develop a simple fitness landscape model, and show...

Data from: Riparian reserves help protect forest bird communities in oil palm dominated landscapes

Simon L. Mitchell, David P. Edwards, Henry Bernard, David Coomes, Tommaso Jucker, Zoe G. Davies & Matthew J. Struebig
1. Conversion of forest to oil palm agriculture is a significant and continuing threat to tropical biodiversity. Despite this, little is known about the value of riparian reserves in oil palm and how these conservation set-asides might best be managed to maintain biodiversity. 2. We characterised bird communities of 28 sites in an oil palm-forest mosaic in Sabah, Malaysia using 6104 encounters from 840 point counts. Sites included oil palm riparian reserves of various vegetation...

Data from: Age-related variation in non-breeding foraging behaviour and carry-over effects on fitness in an extremely long-lived bird

Thomas A. Clay, Elizabeth J. Pearmain, Rona A.R. McGill, Andrea Manica, Richard A. Phillips & Rona A. R. McGill
1. Senescence has been widely documented in wild vertebrate populations, yet the proximate drivers of age-related declines in breeding success, including allocation trade-offs and links with foraging performance, are poorly understood. For long-lived, migratory species, the non-breeding period represents a critical time for investment in self-maintenance and restoration of body condition, which in many species is linked to fitness. However, the relationships between age, non-breeding foraging behaviour and fitness remain largely unexplored. 2. We performed...

Data from: From cacti to carnivores: improved phylotranscriptomic sampling and hierarchical homology inference provide further insight into the evolution of Caryophyllales

Joseph Frederic Walker, Ya Yang, Tao Feng, Alfonso Timoneda, Jessica Mikenas, Vera Hutchison, Caroline Edwards, Ning Wang, Sonia Ahluwalia, Julia Olivieri, Nathanael Walker-Hale, Lucas C. Majure, Raúl Puente, Gudrun Kadereit, Maximillian Lauterbach, Urs Eggli, Hilda Flores-Olvera, Helga Ochoterena, Samuel F. Brockington, Michael J. Moore & Stephen A. Smith
Premise of the Study— The Caryophyllales contains ~12,500 species and is known for its cosmopolitan distribution, convergence of trait evolution, and extreme adaptations. Some relationships within the Caryophyllales, like those of many large plant clades, remain unclear and phylogenetic studies often recover alternative hypotheses. We explore the utility of broad and dense transcriptome sampling across the order for resolving evolutionary relationships in Caryophyllales. Methods— We generated 84 transcriptomes and combined these with 224 publicly available...

Data from: Decomposition of coarse woody debris in a long-term litter manipulation experiment: a focus on nutrient availability

Evan M. Gora, Emma J. Sayer, Benjamin L. Turner & Edmund V. J. Tanner
1.The majority of aboveground carbon in tropical forests is stored in wood, which is returned to the atmosphere during decomposition of coarse woody debris. However, the factors controlling wood decomposition have not been experimentally manipulated over time scales comparable to the length of this process. 2.We hypothesized that wood decomposition is limited by nutrient availability and tested this hypothesis in a long-term litter addition and removal experiment in a lowland tropical forest in Panama. Specifically,...

Data from: Vestigial singing behaviour persists after the evolutionary loss of song in crickets

Will T. Schneider, Christian Rutz, Berthold Hedwig & Nathan W. Bailey
The evolutionary loss of sexual traits is widely predicted. Because sexual signals can arise from the coupling of specialised motor activity with morphological structures, disruption to a single component could lead to overall loss of function. Opportunities to observe this process and characterise any remaining signal components are rare, but could provide insight into the mechanisms, indirect costs, and evolutionary consequences of signal loss. We investigated the recent evolutionary loss of a long-range acoustic sexual...

Data from: Explaining European fungal fruiting phenology with climate variability

Carrie Andrew, Einar Heegaard, Klaus Høiland, Beatrice Senn-Irlet, Thomas W. Kuyper, Irmgard Krisai-Greilhuber, Paul M. Kirk, Jacob Heilmann-Clausen, Alan C. Gange, Simon Egli, Claus Bässler, Ulf Büntgen, Lynne Boddy & Håvard Kauserud
Here we assess the impact of geographically dependent (latitude, longitude and altitude) changes in bioclimatic (temperature, precipitation and primary productivity) variability on fungal fruiting phenology across Europe. Two main nutritional guilds of fungi, saprotrophic and ectomycorrhizal, were further separated into spring and autumn fruiters. We used a path‐analysis to investigate how biogeographic patterns in fungal fruiting phenology coincided with seasonal changes in climate and primary production. Across central to northern Europe, mean fruiting varied by...

Data from: Thrifty phenotype vs cold adaptation: trade-offs in upper limb proportions of Himalayan populations of Nepal

Stephanie Payne, Rajendra B.C. Kumar, Emma Pomeroy, Alison Macintosh, Jay Stock & Rajendra Kumar BC
The multi-stress environment of high altitude has been associated with growth deficits in humans, particularly in zeugopod elements (forearm, lower leg). This is consistent with the thrifty phenotype hypothesis, which has been observed in Andeans, but has yet to be tested in other high altitude populations. In Himalayan populations, other factors, such as cold stress, may shape limb proportions. The current study investigated whether relative upper limb proportions of Himalayan adults (n=254) differ between highland...

Data from: Opposing patterns of intraspecific and interspecific differentiation in sex chromosomes and autosomes

Peter A. Moran, Sonia Pascoal, Timothée Cezard, Judith E. Risse, Michael G. Ritchie & Nathan W. Bailey
Linking intraspecific and interspecific divergence is an important challenge in speciation research. X chromosomes are expected to evolve faster than autosomes and disproportionately contribute to reproductive barriers, and comparing genetic variation on X and autosomal markers within and between species can elucidate evolutionary processes that shape genome variation. We performed RADseq on a 16-population transect of two closely-related Australian cricket species, Teleogryllus commodus and T. oceanicus, covering allopatry and sympatry. This classic study system for...

Data from: Visual approach computation in feeding hoverflies

Malin Thyselius, Paloma T. Gonzalez-Bellido, Trevor J. Wardill & Karin Nordstrom
On warm sunny days female hoverflies are often observed feeding from a wide range of wild and cultivated flowers. In doing so, hoverflies serve a vital role as alternative pollinators, and suggested to be the most important after bees and bumblebees. Unless the flower hoverflies are feeding from is large, they do not readily share the space with other insects, but instead opt to leave. We have used high-speed videography followed by 3D reconstruction of...

Data from: Back and forth Wolbachia transfers reveal efficient strains to control spotted wing drosophila populations

Julien Cattel, Katerina Nikolouli, Thibault Andrieux, Julien Martinez, Francis Jiggins, Sylvain Charlat, Fabrice Vavre, David Lejon, Patricia Gibert & Laurence Mouton
1.Since its recent invasion of the European and American continents, the spotted wing Drosophila Drosophila suzukii has become a burden of the fruit industry. Armed with a highly sclerotized ovipositor, females can lay eggs in a wider variety of ripening and healthy fruits than other Drosophila species. Economic losses due to Drosophila suzukii reach millions of dollars annually and methods to control natural populations in the field mainly rely on the use of chemical pesticides....

Data from: How maternal investment varies with environmental factors and the age and physiological state of wild tsetse Glossina pallidipes and Glossina morsitans morsitans

John W. Hargrove, M. Odwell Muzari & Sinead English
Theory suggests females should optimize resource allocation across reproductive bouts to maximize lifetime reproduction, balancing current and future reproductive efforts according to physiological state and projected survival and reproduction. Tests of these ideas focus on long-lived vertebrates: few measure age-related reproductive output in iteroparous invertebrates, or partition reserves between those allocated to offspring versus mothers. We investigated how maternal age, and environmental and physiological factors influence reproductive investment in wild tsetse, Glossina pallidipes Austen and...

Data from: Ecological conditions alter cooperative behaviour and its costs in a chemically defended sawfly

Carita Lindstedt, Antti Miettinen, Dalial Freitak, Tarmo Ketola, Andrés López-Sepulcre, Elina Mäntylä & Hannu Pakkanen
The evolution of cooperation and social behaviour is often studied in isolation from the ecology of organisms. Yet, the selective environment under which individuals evolve is much more complex in nature, consisting of ecological and abiotic interactions in addition to social ones. Here we measured the life-history costs of cooperative chemical defence in a gregarious social herbivore, Diprion pini pine sawfly larvae, and how these costs vary under different ecological conditions. We ran a rearing...

Data from: Weak population structure of the Spot-tail shark Carcharhinus sorrah and the Blacktip shark C. limbatus along the coasts of the Arabian Peninsula, Pakistan and South Africa

Dareen Almojil, Geremy Cliff, Julia L.Y. Spaet & Julia L. Y. Spaet
The increase in demand for shark meat and fins has placed shark populations worldwide under high fishing pressure. In the Arabian region, the Spot-tail shark Carcharhinus sorrah and the Blacktip shark Carcharhinus limbatus are among the most exploited species. In this study we investigated the population genetic structure of C. sorrah (n= 327) along the coasts of the Arabian Peninsula and of C. limbatus (n= 525) along the Arabian coasts, Pakistan and KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa...

Data from: Fossils reveal the complex evolutionary history of the mammalian regionalized spine

Katrina Elizabeth Jones, K. D. Angielczyk, P. D. Polly, J. J. Head, V. Fernandez, J. K. Lungmus, S. Tulga & S. E. Pierce
A unique characteristic of mammals is a vertebral column with anatomically distinct regions, but when and how this trait evolved remains unknown. Here we reconstruct vertebral regions and their morphological disparity in the extinct forerunners of mammals, the non-mammalian synapsids, to elucidate the evolution of mammalian axial differentiation. Mapping patterns of regionalization and disparity (heterogeneity) across amniotes reveals that both traits increased during synapsid evolution. However, the onset of regionalization predates increased heterogeneity. Based on...

Data from: Trait evolution, resource specialization and vulnerability to plant extinctions among Antillean hummingbirds

Bo Dalsgaard, Jonathan D. Kennedy, Benno I. Simmons, Andrea C. Baquero, Ana M. Martín González, Allan Timmermann, Pietro K. Maruyama, Jimmy A. McGuire, Jeff Ollerton, William J. Sutherland & Carsten Rahbek
Species traits are thought to predict feeding specialisation and the vulnerability of a species to extinctions of interaction partners, but the context in which a species evolved and currently inhabits may also matter. Notably, the predictive power of traits may require that traits evolved to fit interaction partners. Furthermore, local abiotic and biotic conditions may be important. On islands, for instance, specialised and vulnerable species are predicted to be found mainly in mountains, whereas species...

Data from: Support for a clade of Placozoa and Cnidaria in genes with minimal compositional bias

Christopher E. Laumer, Harald Gruber-Vodicka, Michael G. Hadfield, Vicki B. Pearse, Ana Riesgo, John C. Marioni & Gonzalo Giribet
The phylogenetic placement of the morphologically simple placozoans is crucial to understanding the evolution of complex animal traits. Here, we examine the influence of adding new genomes from placozoans to a large dataset designed to study the deepest splits in the animal phylogeny. Using site-heterogeneous substitution models, we show that it is possible to obtain strong support, in both amino acid and reduced-alphabet matrices, for either a sister-group relationship between Cnidaria and Placozoa, or for...

Data from: Approaches to integrating genetic data into ecological networks

Elizabeth L. Clare, Aron J. Fazekas, Natalia V. Ivanova, Robin M. Floyd, Paul D.N. Hebert, Amanda M. Adams, Juliet Nagel, Rebecca Girton, Steven G. Newmaster, M. Brock Fenton & Paul D. N. Hebert
As molecular tools for assessing trophic interactions become common, research is increasingly focused on the construction of interaction networks. Here we demonstrate three key methods for incorporating DNA data into network ecology and discuss analytical considerations using a model consisting of plants, insects, bats and their parasites from the Costa Rican dry forest. The simplest method involves the use of Sanger sequencing to acquire long sequences to validate or refine field identifications, for example of...

Data from: A Tournaisian (earliest Carboniferous) conglomerate-preserved non-marine faunal assemblage and its environmental and sedimentological context

Jennifer A. Clack, Carys E. Bennett, Sarah J. Davies, Andrew C. Scott, Janet E. Sherwin & Timothy R. Smithson
A conglomerate bed from the Tournaisian Ballagan Formation of Scotland preserves a rich array of vertebrate and other non-marine fossils providing an insight into the wider ecosystem and palaeoenvironment that existed during this pivotal stage of Earth history. It challenges hypotheses of a long-lasting post-extinction trough following the end-Devonian extinction event. The fauna recovered includes a wide size range of tetrapods, rhizodonts and dipnoans, from tiny juveniles or small-bodied taxa up to large adults, and...

Data from: TAPBPR mediates peptide dissociation from MHC class I using a leucine lever

F. Tudor Ilca, Andreas Neerincx, Clemens Hermann, Ana Marcu, Stefan Stevanović, Janet E. Deane & Louise H. Boyle
Tapasin and TAPBPR are known to perform peptide editing on major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I) molecules, however, the precise molecular mechanism(s) involved in this process remain largely enigmatic. Here, using immunopeptidomics in combination with novel cell-based assays that assess TAPBPR-mediate peptide exchange, we reveal a critical role for the K22-D35 loop of TAPBPR in mediating peptide exchange on MHC I. We identify a specific leucine within this loop that enables TAPBPR to facilitate...

Microclimate proxy measurements from a logging gradient in Malaysian Borneo

B. Blonder, S. Both, D.A. Coomes, D.M.O. Elias, T. Jucker, J. Kvasnica, N. Majalap, Y.S. Malhi, T. Riutta & M. Svátek
Temperatures recorded 5cm above the forest floor in a gridded design (1 to 13m distance) within three, 1 hectare forest plots in Sabah, Borneo. The dataset also includes air temperature data from a nearby weather station at the same temporal resolution, and spatially-interpolated measurements of topography and canopy structure in each forest plot at a 1m resolution. iButton temperature measurement 5cm above the forest floor in gridded design (1-13m distance) within three 1-ha forest plots...

Drosophila C virus genomes, Cambridge (2017)

F.M. Jiggins & B. Longdon
The resource consists of genome sequence data for the Drosophila C virus that has been serially passaged through different species of Drosophila in the laboratory. The genomes were sequenced and aligned to the reference genome. The frequency of variants at both biallelic and triallelic sites was then calculated. We also generated a phylogeny of the species involved using published data. This data was generated to understand how viruses adapt to new host species by Francis...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    64

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    64

Affiliations

  • University of Cambridge
    64
  • University of Copenhagen
    4
  • University of Edinburgh
    3
  • University of East Anglia
    3
  • University of St Andrews
    3
  • University of California Los Angeles
    3
  • University of Lausanne
    2
  • British Antarctic Survey
    2
  • University of Oslo
    2
  • University of Leeds
    2