14 Works

Data from: Mountain Plover habitat selection and nest survival in relation to weather variability and spatial attributes of Black-tailed Prairie Dog disturbance

Courtney Duchardt, Jeffrey Beck & David Augustine
Habitat loss and altered disturbance regimes have led to declines in many species of grassland and sagebrush birds, including the imperiled Mountain Plover (Charadrius montanus). In certain parts of their range Mountain Plovers rely almost exclusively on Black-Tailed Prairie Dog (Cynomys ludovicianus) colonies as nesting habitat. Previous studies have examined Mountain Plover nest and brood survival on prairie dog colonies, but little is known about how colony size and shape influence these vital rates or...

Mass ratio effects underlie ecosystem responses to environmental change

Melinda Smith, Sally Koerner, Alan Knapp, Meghan Avolio, Francis Chaves, Elsie Denton, John Dietrich, David Gibson, Jesse Gray, Ava Hoffman, David Hoover, Kimberly Komatsu, Andrea Silletti, Kevin Wilcox, Qiang Yu & John Blair
1. Random species loss has been shown experimentally to reduce ecosystem function, sometimes more than other anthropogenic environmental changes. Yet, controversy surrounds the importance of this finding for natural systems where species loss is non-random. 2. We compiled data from 16 multi-year experiments located at a single site in native tallgrass prairie. These experiments included responses to 11 anthropogenic environmental changes, as well as non-random biodiversity loss - either the removal of uncommon/rare plant species...

Data from: Determinants of elephant foraging behavior in a coupled human-natural system: is brown the new green?

Paola S. Branco, Jerod A. Merkle, Robert M. Pringle, Johan Pansu, Arjun B. Potter, Alana Reynolds, Marc Stalmans & Ryan A. Long
1. Crop raiding by wildlife poses major threats to both wildlife conservation and human wellbeing in agro-ecosystems worldwide. These threats are particularly acute in many parts of Africa, where crop raiders include globally threatened megafauna such as elephants, and where smallholder agriculture is a primary source of human livelihood. One framework for understanding herbivore feeding behavior, the forage-maturation hypothesis, predicts that herbivores should align their movements with intermediate forage biomass (i.e., peak green-up); this phenomenon...

Aerosol particle measurements taken during the airborn ARISTO 2016 campaign.

John Ortega, James Smith, Jefferson Snider & J. Michael Reeves
Several different types of measurements of particle size and concentration were compared during the 2016 Airborne Research Instrumentation Testing Opportunity (ARISTO) campaign. The scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) measured number-size distributions for mobility diameters between ~20-350 nm or ~8-110 nm, depending on the mobility analyzer chosen. Also included were two stand-alone condensation particle counters (CPC) for determining size-integrated particle concentrations. A wing-mounted and a rack-mounted Ultra-High Sensitivity Aerosol Spectrometer (UHSAS) were used to measure size...

Data from: Pathogens manipulate the preference of vectors, slowing disease spread in a multi-host system

Lauren G. Shoemaker, Evelyn Hayhurst, Christopher P. Weiss-Lehman, Alexander T. Strauss, Anita Porath-Krause, Elizabeth T. Borer, Eric W. Seabloom & Allison K. Shaw
The spread of vector‐borne pathogens depends on a complex set of interactions among pathogen, vector, and host. In single‐host systems, pathogens can induce changes in vector preferences for infected vs. healthy hosts. Yet it is unclear if pathogens also induce changes in vector preference among host species, and how changes in vector behaviour alter the ecological dynamics of disease spread. Here, we couple multi‐host preference experiments with a novel model of vector preference general to...

An experimental test of community-based strategies for mitigating human-wildlife conflict around protected areas

Ryan Long, Paola Branco, Jerod Merkle, Robert Pringle, Lucy King, Tosca Tindall & Marc Stalmans
Natural habitats are rapidly being converted to cultivated croplands, and crop-raiding by wildlife threatens both wildlife conservation and human livelihoods worldwide. We combined movement data from GPS-collared elephants with camera-trap data and local reporting systems in a before-after-control-impact design to evaluate community-based strategies for reducing crop raiding outside Mozambique’s Gorongosa National Park. All types of experimental fences tested (beehive, chili, beehive and chili combined, and procedural controls) significantly reduced the number of times elephants left...

Data from: Plant host identity and soil macronutrients explain little variation in sapling endophyte community composition: is disturbance an alternative explanation?

Eric A. Griffin, Joshua G. Harrison, Steven W. Kembel, Alyssa A. Carrell, S. Joseph Wright & Walter P. Carson
1. Bacterial endophytes may be fairly host specific; nonetheless, an important subset of taxa may be shared among numerous host species forming a community-wide core microbiome. Moreover, other key factors, particularly the supply of limiting macronutrients and disturbances, may supersede the importance of host identity. 2. We tested the following four non-mutually exclusive hypotheses: 1. The Host Identity Hypothesis: endophytes vary substantially among different host plant species. 2. The Core Microbiome Hypothesis: a subset of...

Data from: Genetic evidence for species cohesion, substructure, and hybrids in spruce

Monia S.H Haselhorst, Thomas L Parchman & C. Alex Buerkle
The origin and history of species are shaped by various evolutionary dynamics, including their persistence in the face of potential gene flow from related taxa. In this study we use broad geographic and taxonomic sampling (2,219 individuals) to establish the distribution of species, hybrids, and cryptic genetic variation within the conifer genus Picea (spruce) across western North America. We demonstrate that the six species of spruce in this region are distinguishable based on their genetic...

Data from: Negative frequency-dependent foraging behaviour in a generalist herbivore (Alces alces) and its stabilizing influence on food-web dynamics

Sarah R. Hoy, John A. Vucetich, Rongsong Liu, Don L. DeAngelis, Rolf O. Peterson, Leah M. Vucetich & John J. Henderson
1.Resource selection is widely appreciated to be context‐dependent and shaped by both biological and abiotic factors. However, few studies have empirically assessed the extent to which selective foraging behaviour is dynamic and varies in response to environmental conditions for free‐ranging animal populations. 2.Here, we assessed the extent that forage selection fluctuated in response to different environmental conditions for a free‐ranging herbivore, moose (Alces alces) in Isle Royale National Park, over a 10‐year period. More precisely,...

Data from: Migrating bison engineer the green wave

Chris Geremia, Jerod Merkle, Daniel Eacker, Rick Wallen, P.J. White, Mark Hebblewhite & Matthew Kauffman
Newly emerging plants provide the best forage for herbivores. To exploit this fleeting resource, migrating herbivores align their movements to surf the wave of spring green-up. With new technology to track migrating animals, the Green Wave Hypothesis has steadily gained empirical support across a diversity of migratory taxa. This hypothesis assumes the green wave is controlled by variation in climate, weather, and topography, and its progression dictates the timing, pace, and extent of migrations. However,...

Accuracy of de novo assembly of DNA sequences from double‐digest libraries varies substantially among software

Melanie E. F. LaCava, Ellen O. Aikens, Libby C. Megna, Gregg Randolph, Charley Hubbard & C. Alex Buerkle
Advances in DNA sequencing have made it feasible to gather genomic data for non-model organisms and large sets of individuals, often using methods for sequencing subsets of the genome. Several of these methods sequence DNA associated with endonuclease restriction sites (various RAD and GBS methods). For use in taxa without a reference genome, these methods rely on de novo assembly of fragments in the sequencing library. Many of the software options available for this application...

Urbanization impacts apex predator gene flow but not genetic diversity across an urban-rural divide

Daryl R Trumbo, Patricia E Salerno, Kenneth Logan, Mat Alldredge, Roderick B Gagne, Christopher P Kozakiewicz, Simona Kraberger, Nick Fountain-Jones, Meggan E Craft, Scott Carver, Holly B Ernest, Kevin Crooks, Sue VandeWoude & W. Chris Funk
Apex predators are important indicators of intact natural ecosystems. They are also sensitive to urbanization because they require broad home ranges and extensive contiguous habitat to support their prey base. Pumas (Puma concolor) can persist near human developed areas, but urbanization may be detrimental to their movement ecology, population structure, and genetic diversity. To investigate potential effects of urbanization in population connectivity of pumas, we performed a landscape genomics study of 130 pumas on the...

Data from: Anthropogenic land‐use change intensifies the effect of low flows on stream fishes

Richard H. Walker, Carlin E. Girard, Samantha L. Alford & Annika W. Walters
1. As ecosystems experience simultaneous disturbances, it is critical to understand how multiple stressors interact to affect ecological change. Land-use change (LUC) and extreme flow events are two important stressors that could interact to affect fish populations. 2. We evaluated the individual and interactive effects of discharge and LUC associated with oil and natural gas development (ONGD) on populations of two stream fishes over a seven-year period. We used repeated-state (i.e., abundance trends) and rate...

Data from: Long-term population dynamics of dreissenid mussels (Dreissena polymorpha and D. rostriformis): a cross-system analysis

David L. Strayer, Boris V. Adamovich, Rita Adrian, David C. Aldridge, Csilla Balogh, Lyubov E. Burlakova, Hannah B. Fried-Petersen, László G.‐Tóth, Amy L. Hetherington, Thomas S. Jones, Alexander Y. Karatayev, Jacqueline B. Madill, Oleg A. Makarevich, J. Ellen Marsden, Andre L. Martel, Dan Minchin, Thomas F. Nalepa, Ruurd Noordhuis, Timothy J. Robinson, Lars G. Rudstam, Astrid N. Schwalb, David R. Smith, Alan D. Steinman & Jonathan M. Jeschke
Dreissenid mussels (including the zebra mussel Dreissena polymorpha and the quagga mussel D. rostriformis) are among the world's most notorious invasive species, with large and widespread ecological and economic effects. However, their long‐term population dynamics are poorly known, even though these dynamics are critical to determining impacts and effective management. We gathered and analyzed 67 long‐term (>10 yr) data sets on dreissenid populations from lakes and rivers across Europe and North America. We addressed five...

Registration Year

  • 2019
    14

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    14

Affiliations

  • University of Wyoming
    14
  • United States Geological Survey
    3
  • Princeton University
    2
  • University of Minnesota
    2
  • University of Idaho
    2
  • Colorado State University
    2
  • Parco Nazionale d'Abruzzo
    1
  • Grand Valley State University
    1
  • Michigan Technological University
    1
  • University of Montana
    1