24 Works

Individual variation creates diverse migratory portfolios in native populations of a mountain ungulate

Blake Lowrey, Doug McWhirter, Kelly Proffitt, Kevin Monteith, Alyson Courtemanch, Patrick White, John Paterson, Sarah Dewey & Robert Garrott
Ecological theory and empirical studies have demonstrated population‐level demographic benefits resulting from a diversity of migratory behaviors with important implications for ecology, conservation, and evolution of migratory organisms. Nevertheless, evaluation of migratory portfolios (i.e., the variation in migratory behaviors across space and time among individuals within populations) has received relatively little attention in migratory ungulates, where research has focused largely on the dichotomous behaviors (e.g., resident and migrant) of partially migratory populations. Using GPS data...

Data from: Life-history theory provides a framework for detecting resource limitation: a test of the Nutritional Buffer Hypothesis

Brett Jesmer, Matthew Kauffman, Alyson Courtemanch, Steve Kilpatrick, Timothy Thomas, Jeff Yost, Kevin Monteith & Jacob Goheen
For ungulates and other long-lived species, life-history theory predicts that nutritional reserves are allocated to reproduction in a state-dependent manner because survival is highly conserved. Further, as per-capita food abundance and nutritional reserves decline (i.e., density-dependence intensifies), reproduction and recruitment become increasingly sensitive to weather. Thus, the degree to which weather influences vital rates should be associated with proximity to nutritional carrying capacity—a notion that we refer to as the Nutritional Buffer Hypothesis. We tested...

Pronghorn population genomics show connectivity at the core of their range

Melanie E.F. LaCava, Roderick B. Gagne, Sierra M. Love Stowell, Kyle D. Gustafson, C. Alex Buerkle, Lee Knox & Holly B. Ernest
Preserving connectivity in the core of a species’ range is crucial for long-term persistence. However, a combination of ecological characteristics, social behavior, and landscape features can reduce connectivity among wildlife populations and lead to genetic structure. Pronghorn (Antilocapra americana), for example, exhibit fluctuating herd dynamics and variable seasonal migration strategies, but GPS-tracking studies show that landscape features such as highways impede their movements, leading to conflicting hypotheses about expected levels of genetic structure. Given that...

Data from: A nested association mapping panel in Arabidopsis thaliana for mapping and characterizing genetic architecture

Marcus Brock
Linkage and association mapping populations are crucial public resources that facilitate the characterization of trait genetic architecture in natural and agricultural systems. We define a large nested association mapping panel (NAM) from 14 publicly available recombinant inbred populations (RILs) of Arabidopsis thaliana, which share a common recurrent parent (Col-0). Using a genotype-by-sequencing approach (GBS), we identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs; range 563-1525 per population) and subsequently built updated linkage maps in each of the 14...

Functional traits of avian frugivores have shifted following species extinction and introduction in the Hawaiian Islands

Samuel Case & Corey Tarwater
The extinction and introduction of species can alter ecological processes owing to the loss or gain of species roles. In vertebrate-dependent seed dispersal, mutualisms between frugivores and fruiting plants depend, in part, on matching of functional traits. High species turnover of frugivores has occurred on the Hawaiian Islands, owing to both the loss of native frugivores and the introduction of a new suite of frugivores. How this turnover has altered the functional traits of frugivores...

Infection status as the basis for habitat choices in a wild amphibian

Gabriel Barrile, Anna Chalfoun & Annika Walters
Animals challenged with disease may select specific habitat conditions that help prevent or reduce infection. Whereas pre-infection avoidance of habitats with a high risk of disease exposure has been documented in both captive and free-ranging animals, evidence of post-infection habitat switching to conditions that promote the clearing of infection is limited to laboratory experiments. The extent to which wild animals proximately modify habitat choices in response to infection status therefore remains unclear. We investigated pre-infection...

Data from: The value of the species interaction-abiotic stress hypothesis (SIASH) for invasion biology: using native latitude to explain non-native latitudinal range sizes

Mark Kirk, Brandon Hays & Chris Petranek
Establishment and spread of introduced species are difficult to predict because they are subject to a myriad of factors. A hypothesis which integrates multiple ecological processes, such as the species interaction-abiotic stress hypothesis (SIASH), may improve our ability to predict introduction success (i.e. establishment and spread). SIASH postulates that, along an environmental gradient, species’ range limits are set by abiotic stress at the environmentally harsh end of that gradient and by species interactions at the...

Data from: Elk migration influences the risk of disease spillover in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem

Nathaniel Rayl, Jerod Merkle, Kelly Proffitt, Emily Almberg, Jennifer Jones, Justin Gude & Paul Cross
Wildlife migrations provide important ecosystem services, but they are declining. Within the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (GYE) some elk (Cervus canadensis) herds are losing migratory tendencies, which may increase spatiotemporal overlap between elk and livestock (domestic bison [Bison bison] and cattle [Bos taurus]), potentially exacerbating pathogen transmission risk. We combined disease, movement, demographic, and environmental data from eight elk herds in the GYE to examine the differential risk of brucellosis transmission (through aborted fetuses) from migrant...

Finescale dace occurrence and abiotic and biotic covariates for the Belle Fourche River and Niobrara River basins

Evan Booher & Annika Walters
Aim The factors that set range limits for animal populations can inform management plans aimed at maintaining regional biodiversity. We examine abiotic and biotic drivers of the distribution of finescale dace (Chrosomus neogaeus) in two Great Plains basins to identify limiting factors for a threatened freshwater fish population at the edge of their range. Location Great Plains, Nebraska, South Dakota, and Wyoming, USA Methods We investigated abiotic and biotic factors influencing the contemporary distribution of...

Implications for evolutionary trends from the pairing frequencies among golden-winged and blue-winged warblers and their hybrids

John Confer, Cody Porter, Kyle Aldinger, Ronald Canterbury, Jeffery Larkin & Darin McNeil
Extensive range loss for the Golden-winged Warbler (Vermivora chrysoptera) has occurred in areas of intrusion by the Blue-winged Warbler (V. cyanoptera) potentially related to their close genetic relationship. We compiled data on social pairing from nine studies for 2,679 resident Vermivora to assess evolutionary divergence. Hybridization between pure phenotypes occurred with 1.2% of resident males for sympatric populations. Pairing success rates for Golden-winged Warblers was 83% and for Blue-winged Warblers was 77%. Pairing success for...

Data from: Enhanced seed defenses potentially relax selection by seed predators against serotiny in lodgepole pine

Craig Benkman & Anna Parker
Serotiny, the retention of seeds in a canopy seed bank until high temperatures cause seeds to be released, is an important life history trait for many woody plants in fire-prone habitats. Serotiny provides a competitive advantage after fire but increases vulnerability to predispersal seed predation, due to the seeds being retained in clusters in predictable locations for extended periods. This creates opposing selection pressures. Serotiny is favored in areas of high fire frequency, but is...

Gross primary production responses to warming, elevated CO2 , and irrigation: quantifying the drivers of ecosystem physiology in a semiarid grassland

Elise Pendall, Edmund M. Ryan, Kiona Ogle, Drew Peltier, David G. Williams, Anthony P. Walker, Martin G. De Kauwe, Belinda E. Medlyn, William Parton, Shinichi Asao, Bertrand Guenet, Anna B. Harper, Xingjie Lu, Kristina A. Luus, Sönke Zaehle, Shijie Shu, Christian Werner & Jianyang Xia
Determining whether the terrestrial biosphere will be a source or sink of carbon (C) under a future climate of elevated CO2 (eCO2) and warming requires accurate quantification of gross primary production (GPP), the largest flux of C in the global C cycle. We evaluated 6 years (2007–2012) of flux‐derived GPP data from the Prairie Heating and CO2 Enrichment (PHACE) experiment, situated in a grassland in Wyoming, USA. The GPP data were used to calibrate a...

Data for degrees earned by faculty teaching in soil science preparatory programs at universities in the USA

Eric Brevik & Karen Vaughan
In the early 2000s some were concerned that few soil science graduate students were receiving their bachelor’s degrees in soil science. However, no studies were conducted to investigate this or how it may have changed over time. Information available on university webpages for faculty in the USA was used to determine the faculty’s bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral degree disciplines. Faculty rank was used to determine if a change had occurred in the percent of faculty...

Data from: Population genomic diversity and structure at the discontinuous southern range of the Great Gray Owl in North America

Beth Mendelsohn & Holly Ernest
Species' distributions are often discontinuous near the edge of the range where the environment may be more variable than the core of the range. Range discontinuity can reduce or cut off gene flow to small peripheral populations and lead to genetic drift and subsequent loss of genetic diversity. The southern extent of the Great Gray Owl ( Strixnebulosa) range in North America is discontinuous, unlike their northern core range across the boreal forests. We sampled...

A new method to reconstruct quantitative food webs and nutrient flows from isotope tracer addition experiments

Andres Lopez-Sepulcre, Matthieu Bruneaux, Sarah Michelle Collins, Rana El-Sabaawi, Alexander S Flecker & Steven A Thomas
Understanding how nutrients flow through food webs is central in ecosystem ecology. Tracer addition experiments are powerful tools to reconstruct nutrient flows by adding an isotopically enriched element into an ecosystem, and tracking its fate through time. Historically, the design and analysis of tracer studies have varied widely, ranging from descriptive studies to modeling approaches of varying complexity. Increasingly, isotope tracer data is being used being used to compare ecosystems and analyze experimental manipulations. Currently,...

Biogeographic parallels in thermal tolerance and gene expression variation under temperature stress in a widespread bumble bee

Meaghan Pimsler, Kennan Oyen, James Herndon, Jason Jackson, James Strange, Michael Dillon & Jeff Lozier
Global temperature changes have emphasized the need to understand how species adapt to thermal stress across their ranges. Genetic mechanisms may contribute to variation in thermal tolerance, providing evidence for how organisms adapt to local environments. We determine physiological thermal limits and characterize genome-wide transcriptional changes at these limits in bumble bees using laboratory-reared Bombus vosnesenskii workers. We analyze bees reared from latitudinal (35.7–45.7°N) and altitudinal (7–2154 m) extremes of the species’ range to correlate...

Recent hybrids recapitulate ancient hybrid outcomes

Zachariah Gompert, Samridhi Chaturvedi, Lauren Lucas, C. Alex Buerkle, James Fordyce, Matthew Forister & Chris Nice
Genomic outcomes of hybridization depend on selection and recombination in hybrids. Whether these processes have similar effects on hybrid genome composition in contemporary hybrid zones versus ancient hybrid lineages is unknown. Here we show that patterns of introgression in a contemporary hybrid zone in Lycaeides butterflies predict patterns of ancestry in geographically adjacent, older hybrid populations. We find a particularly striking lack of ancestry from one of the hybridizing taxa, Lycaeides melissa, on the Z...

Novel hybrid finds a peri-urban niche: Allen’s Hummingbirds in southern California

Braden L. Godwin, Melanie E. F. LaCava, Beth Mendelsohn, Roderick B. Gagne, Kyle D. Gustafson, Sierra M. Love Stowell, Andrew Engilis, Lisa A. Tell & Holly B. Ernest
Species range expansions and contractions can have ecological and genetic consequences, and thus are important areas of study for conservation. Hybridization and introgression are not uncommon in closely related populations that experience secondary contact during a range expansion. Allen’s Hummingbird (Selasphorus sasin) in California comprises two subspecies: the migratory S. s. sasin, which winters in central Mexico and breeds in central and northern California, and the resident S. s. sedentarius, which lives and breeds year-round...

Data from: Harvester ant seed removal in an invaded sagebrush ecosystem: implications for restoration

Kelsey Paolini
A better understanding of seed movement in plant community dynamics is needed, especially in light of disturbance-driven changes and investments into restoring degraded plant communities. A primary agent of change within the sagebrush-steppe is wildfire and invasion by non-native forbs and grasses, primarily cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum). Our objectives were to quantify seed removal and evaluate ecological factors influencing seed removal within degraded sagebrush-steppe by granivorous Owyhee harvester ants (Pogonomyrmex salinus Olsen). In 2014, we sampled...

Data from: Pliant pathogens: Estimating viral spread when confronted with new vector, host, and environmental conditions

Anita Krause, Eric Seabloom, Elizabeth Borer, Lauren Shoemaker, Andrew Sieben, Ryan Campbell, Alexander Strauss & Allison Shaw
Pathogen spread rates are determined, in part, by the performance of pathogens under altered environmental conditions and their ability to persist while switching among hosts and vectors. To determine the effects of new conditions (host, vector, and nutrient) on pathogen spread rate, we introduced a vector-borne, viral plant pathogen, Barley Yellow Dwarf Virus PAV (BYDV-PAV) into hosts, vectors, and host nutrient supplies that it had not encountered for thousands of viral generations. We quantified pathogen...

Investigating the morphological and genetic divergence of arctic char (Salvelinus alpinus) populations in lakes of arctic Alaska

Stephen L. Klobucar, Jessica Rick, Elizabeth Mandeville, Catherine Wagner & Phaedra Budy
Polymorphism facilitates coexistence of divergent morphs (e.g., phenotypes) of the same species by minimizing intraspecific competition, especially when resources are limiting. Arctic char (Salvelinus sp.) are a Holarctic fish often forming morphologically, and sometimes genetically, divergent morphs. In this study, we assessed the morphological and genetic diversity and divergence of 263 individuals from seven populations of arctic char with varying length-frequency distributions across two distinct groups of lakes in northern Alaska. Despite close geographic proximity,...

Local adaptation across a complex bioclimatic landscape in two montane bumble bee species

Jason Jackson, Meaghan Pimsler, Kennan Oyen, James Strange, Michael Dillon & Jeffrey Lozier
Understanding evolutionary responses to variation in temperature and precipitation across species ranges is of fundamental interest given ongoing climate change. The importance of temperature and precipitation for multiple aspects of bumble bee (Bombus) biology, combined with large geographic ranges that expose populations to diverse environmental pressures, make these insects well-suited for studying local adaptation. We analyzed genome-wide sequence data from two widespread bumble bees, Bombus vosnesenskii and Bombus vancouverensis, using multiple Environmental Association Analysis methods...

Data from: Drought mildly reduces plant dominance in a temperate prairie ecosystem across years

Karen Castillioni, Kevin Wilcox, Lifen Jiang, Chang Gyo Jung, Yiqi Luo & Lara Souza
1. Shifts in dominance and species reordering can occur in response to global change. However, it is not clear how altered precipitation and disturbance regimes interact to affect species composition and dominance. 2. We explored community-level diversity and compositional similarity responses, both across and within years, to a manipulated precipitation gradient and annual clipping in a mixed-grass prairie in Oklahoma, USA. We imposed seven precipitation treatments (five water exclusion levels [-20%, -40%, -60%, -80%, and...

Data from: Extending null scenarios with Faddy distributions in a probabilistic randomization protocol for presence-absence data

Jorge Navarro Alberto, Bryan Manly & Kenneth Gerow
1. The analysis of species occurrences at discrete locations makes use of statistical methods intended to elucidate whether a random process can explain a particular observed pattern of presences-absences (1-0). Various statistical methods have contributed to the development of null model analysis of (1-0) data in community ecology using randomization tests. Frequentist techniques assuming probability distributions under the null scenarios have been proposed, as in the work by Navarro and Manly (2009) (NM), a protocol...

Registration Year

  • 2020
    24

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    24

Affiliations

  • University of Wyoming
    24
  • Utah State University
    3
  • University of Cincinnati
    3
  • United States Geological Survey
    3
  • Colorado State University
    3
  • Missouri Southern State University
    2
  • Northern Arizona University
    2
  • University of Oklahoma
    2
  • Colorado Parks and Wildlife
    2
  • The Ohio State University
    1