6 Works

Data from: Temporal genetic structure in a poecilogonous polychaete: the interplay of developmental mode and environmental stochasticity

Jenni E. Kesäniemi, Marina Mustonen, Christoffer Boström, Benni W. Hansen & K. Emily Knott
Background: Temporal variation in the genetic structure of populations can be caused by multiple factors, including natural selection, stochastic environmental variation, migration, or genetic drift. In benthic marine species, the developmental mode of larvae may indicate a possibility for temporal genetic variation: species with dispersive planktonic larvae are expected to be more likely to show temporal genetic variation than species with benthic or brooded non-dispersive larvae, due to differences in larval mortality and dispersal ability....

Accounting for environmental variation in co‐occurrence modelling reveals the importance of positive interactions in root‐associated fungal communities

Nerea Abrego, Tomas Roslin, Tea Huotari, Ayco J.M. Tack, Björn D. Lindahl, Gleb Tikhonov, Panu Somervuo, Niels Martin Schmidt, Otso Ovaskainen & Ayco J. M. Tack
Understanding the role of interspecific interactions in shaping ecological communities is one of the central goals in community ecology. In fungal communities, measuring interspecific interactions directly is challenging because these communities are composed of large numbers of species, many of which are unculturable. An indirect way of assessing the role of interspecific interactions in determining community structure is to identify the species co-occurrences that are not constrained by the environmental conditions. In this study, we...

Data from: The story of a hitchhiker: population genetic patterns in the invasive barnacle Balanus (Amphibalanus) improvisus Darwin 1854

Anna-Lisa Wrange, Gregory Charrier, Anne Thonig, Magnus Alm Rosenblad, Anders Blomberg, Jonathan N. Havenhand, Per R. Jonsson & Carl André
Understanding the ecological and evolutionary forces that determine the genetic structure and spread of invasive species is a key component of invasion biology. The bay barnacle, Balanus improvisus (= Amphibalanus improvisus), is one of the most successful aquatic invaders worldwide, and is characterised by broad environmental tolerance. Although the species can spread through natural larval dispersal, human-mediated transport through (primarily) shipping has almost certainly contributed to the current global distribution of this species. Despite its...

Interspecific interactions regulate plant reproductive allometry in cereal-legume intercropping systems

Noémie Gaudio, Cyrille Violle, Xavier Gendre, Florian Fort, Rémi Mahmoud, Elise Pelzer, Safia Médiène, Henrik Hauggaard-Nielsen, Laurent Bedoussac, Catherine Bonnet, Guénaëlle Corre-Hellou, Antoine Couëdel, Philippe Hinsinger, Eric Steen Jensen, Etienne-Pascal Journet, Eric Justes, Bochra Kammoun, Isabelle Litrico, Nathalie Moutier, Christophe Naudin & Pierre Casadebaig
1. Calls for the application of ecological principles in agriculture have gained momentum. Intercropping systems are designed by growing two, or more, annual crop species in the same field, aiming for a better resource use efficiency. However, assembly rules for their design are lacking. Notably, it is unknown whether species performances are maximized during both the vegetative and reproductive phases given the sensitivity of reproductive allocation rules to resource limitation. Interestingly, ecological theory provides expectations...

Data from: Seasonal genetic variation associated with population dynamics of a poecilogonous polychaete worm

Anne Thonig, Gary Thomas Banta, Benni Winding Hansen & K. Emily Knott
Poecilogonous species show variation in developmental mode, with larvae that differ both morphologically and ecologically. The spionid polychaete Pygospio elegans shows variation in developmental mode not only between populations, but also seasonally within populations. We investigated the consequences of this developmental polymorphism on the spatial and seasonal genetic structure of P. elegans at four sites in the Danish Isefjord-Roskilde-Fjord estuary at six time points, from March 2014 until February 2015. We found genetic differentiation between...

Data from: Establishing a community-wide DNA barcode library as a new tool for arctic research

H. Wirta, G. Várkonyi, C. Rasmussen, R. Kaartinen, N. M. Schmidt, P. D. N. Hebert, M. Barták, G. Blagoev, H. Disney, S. Ertl, P. Gjelstrup, D. J. Gwiazdowicz, L. Huldén, J. Ilmonen, J. Jakovlev, M. Jaschhof, J. Kahanpää, T. Kankaanpää, P. H. Krogh, R. Labbee, C. Lettner, V. Michelsen, S. A. Nielsen, T. R. Nielsen, L. Paasivirta … & T. Roslin
DNA sequences offer powerful tools for describing the members and interactions of natural communities. In this study, we establish the to-date most comprehensive library of DNA barcodes for a terrestrial site, including all known macroscopic animals and vascular plants of an intensively studied area of the High Arctic, the Zackenberg Valley in Northeast Greenland. To demonstrate its utility, we apply the library to identify nearly 20 000 arthropod individuals from two Malaise traps, each operated...

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