117 Works

Floral spectral reflectance data for: Floral color properties of serpentine seep assemblages depend on community size and species richness

Kathryn LeCroy, Gerardo Arceo-Gómez, Matthew Koski, Nathan Morehouse & Tia-Lynn Ashman
Functional traits, particularly those that impact fitness, can shape the ecological and evolutionary relationships among coexisting species of the same trophic level. Thus, examining these traits and properties of their distributions (underdispersion, overdispersion) within communities can provide insights into key ecological interactions (e.g., competition, facilitation) involved in community assembly. For instance, the distribution of floral colors in a community may reflect pollinator-mediated interactions between sympatric plant species, and the phylogenetic distribution of color can inform...

Data from: \"Development of the draft genome sequence of the marbled flounder Pseudopleuronectes yokohamae as a reference of population genomic analysis\" in Genomic Resources Notes accepted 1 February 2015 – 31 March 2015

Yuki Minegishi, Minoru Ikeda, Lynda F. Delph, Laura A. Weingartner, Peter D. Fields, Laura Bertini, Carla Caruso, Silvia Proietti, Wolfgang Arthofer, Francesco Cicconardi, Heike Ritthammer, Birgit C. Schlick-Steiner, Florian M. Steiner, Gregor A. Wachter & Herbert C. Wagner
This article documents the public availability of the draft genome sequence data (raw reads, assembled contigs and unassembled reads) and RAD-tag read data of the marbled flounder Pseudopleuronectes yokohamae (Pleuronectiformes; Pleuronectidae).

Data from: Crop-associated virus infection in a native perennial grass: reduction in plant fitness and dynamic patterns of virus detection

Helen M. Alexander, Emily Bruns, Hayley Schebor & Carolyn M. Malmstrom
To understand the eco-evolutionary significance of plant viruses in nature, we must (i) quantify the effects of infection on plant fitness and (ii) recognize that native plants are increasingly exposed to crop-associated viruses. Studies of perennials are particularly needed: most of our knowledge of plant-virus interactions is from annuals, yet long-lived species dominate landscapes. Here we used aster models for life-history analysis and longitudinal measures of plant virus status to evaluate multi-year consequences of crop...

Data from: Performance of TaqMan Array Card to detect TB drug resistance on direct specimens

Sayera Banu, Suporn Pholwat, Suporn Foongladda, Rattapha Chinli, Duangjai Boonlert, Sara Sabrina Ferdous, S.M. Mazidur Rahman, Arfatur Rahman, Shahriar Ahmed & Eric R. Houpt
Culture based phenotypic drug susceptibility testing (DST) for Mycobacterium tuberculosis (TB) is time consuming therefore rapid genotypic methods are increasingly being utilized. We previously developed and evaluated on TB isolates a rapid genotypic TaqMan array card (TAC) that detects mutations in several resistance-associated genes using dozens of primer pairs, probes, and high resolution melt analysis, with >96% accuracy versus Sanger sequencing. In this study we examined the performance of TAC on sputum, comparing results between...

Data from: Aging in an herbaceous plant: increases in mortality and decreases in physiology and seed mass

Brandie M. Quarles & Deborah Ann Roach
1. Little is known about plant age-dependent trait expression and how environmental conditions might affect aging in the wild. This study evaluates age variation in multiple traits of a short-lived perennial herb using a manipulative field experimental design. 2. Two different-aged cohorts were followed in a field plot for over a year to evaluate trait expression in response to a competition treatment and seasonal stress. Traits measured included size, mortality, reproduction, and physiology, including photosynthetic...

Data from: Range‐wide population genetic structure of the Caribbean marine angiosperm Thalassia testudinum

Kor-Jent Van Dijk, Eric Bricker, Brigitta Ine Van Tussenbroek & Michelle Waycott
Many marine species have widespread geographic ranges derived from their evolutionary and ecological history particularly their modes of dispersal. Seagrass (marine angiosperm) species have ranges that are unusually widespread, which is not unexpected following recent reviews of reproductive strategies demonstrating the potential for long distance dispersal combined with longevity through clonality. An exemplar of these dual biological features is turtlegrass (Thalassia testudinum) which is an ecologically important species throughout the tropical Atlantic region. Turtlegrass has...

Data from: Characterization of transcriptomes from sexual and asexual lineages of a New Zealand snail (Potamopyrgus antipodarum)

Peter R. Wilton, Daniel B. Sloan, John M. Logsdon, Harshavardhan Doddapaneni, Maurine Neiman &
Understanding the evolution and maintenance of sexual reproduction is one of the central challenges of evolutionary biology, yet we know very little about how sex influences molecular evolution. The New Zealand freshwater snail Potamopyrgus antipodarum is ideally suited to address this knowledge gap because obligately sexual individuals often coexist with multiple independently derived obligately asexual lineages. This unusual situation allows direct comparisons both between sexual and asexual P. antipodarum and across populations that differ in...

Data from: Patterns of cyto-nuclear linkage disequilibrium in Silene latifolia: genomic heterogeneity and temporal stability

Peter D. Fields, David E. McCauley, Edward V. McAssey & Douglas R. Taylor
Non-random association of alleles in the nucleus and cytoplasmic organelles, or cyto-nuclear linkage disequilibrium (LD), is both an important component of a number of evolutionary processes and a statistical indicator of others. The evolutionary significance of cyto-nuclear LD will depend on both its magnitude and how stable those associations are through time. Here, we use a longitudinal population genetic data set to explore the magnitude and temporal dynamics of cyto-nuclear disequilibria through time. We genotyped...

Data from: Convergent evolution of phenotypic integration and its alignment with morphological diversification in Carribean Anolis ecomorphs

Jason J. Kolbe, Liam J. Revell, Brian Szekely, & Jonathan B Losos
The adaptive landscape and the G-matrix are keys concepts for understanding how quantitative characters evolve during adaptive radiation. In particular, whether the adaptive landscape can drive convergence of phenotypic integration (i.e., the pattern of phenotypic variation and covariation summarized in the P-matrix) is not well studied. We estimated and compared P for 19 morphological traits in eight species of Caribbean Anolis lizards, finding that similarity in P among species was not correlated with phylogenetic distance....

Data from: Ret and Etv4 promote directed movements of progenitor cells during renal branching morphogenesis

Paul Riccio, Cristina Cebrian, Hui Zong, Simon Hippenmeyer & Frank Costantini
Branching morphogenesis of the epithelial ureteric bud forms the renal collecting duct system and is critical for normal nephron number, while low nephron number is implicated in hypertension and renal disease. Ureteric bud growth and branching requires GDNF signaling from the surrounding mesenchyme to cells at the ureteric bud tips, via the Ret receptor tyrosine kinase and coreceptor Gfrα1; Ret signaling up-regulates transcription factors Etv4 and Etv5, which are also critical for branching. Despite extensive...

Data from: Does adaptive radiation of a host lineage promote ecological diversity of its bacterial communities? A test using gut microbiota of Anolis lizards

Tiantian Ren, Ariel F. Kahrl, Martin Wu & Robert M. Cox
Adaptive radiations provide unique opportunities to test whether and how recent ecological and evolutionary diversification of host species structures the composition of entire bacterial communities. We used 16S rRNA gene sequencing of faecal samples to test for differences in the gut microbiota of six species of Puerto Rican Anolis lizards characterized by the evolution of distinct ‘ecomorphs’ related to differences in habitat use. We found substantial variation in the composition of the microbiota within each...

Data from: Rapid genetic and morphologic divergence between captive and wild populations of the endangered Leon Springs pupfish, Cyprinodon bovinus

Andrew Black, Heidi A. Seears, Christoper M. Hollenbeck, Paul B. Samollow, Andrew N. Black & Christopher M. Hollenbeck
The Leon Springs pupfish (Cyprinodon bovinus) is an endangered species currently restricted to a single desert spring and a separate captive habitat in southwestern North America. Following establishment of the captive population from wild stock in 1976, the wild population has undergone natural population size fluctuations, intentional culling to purge genetic contamination from an invasive congener (Cyprinodon variegatus) and augmentation/replacement of wild fish from the captive stock. A severe population decline following the most recent...

Data from: The genetic architecture of novel trophic specialists: higher effect sizes are associated with exceptional oral jaw diversification in a pupfish adaptive radiation

Christopher H. Martin, Priscilla A. Erickson & Craig T. Miller
The genetic architecture of adaptation is fundamental to understanding the mechanisms and constraints governing diversification. However, most case studies focus on loss of complex traits or parallel speciation in similar environments. It is still unclear how the genetic architecture of these local adaptive processes compares to the architecture of evolutionary transitions contributing to morphological and ecological novelty. Here we identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) between two trophic specialists in an excellent case study for examining...

Data from: The timing of molecular and morphological changes underlying reproductive transitions in wild tomatoes (Solanum sect. Lycopersicon)

Stacey L. Vosters, Cathleen P. Jewell, Natasha A. Sherman, Frances Einterz, Benjamin K. Blackman & Leonie C. Moyle
Molecular mechanisms underlying the transition from genetic self-incompatibility to self-compatibility are well documented, but the evolution of other reproductive trait changes that accompany shifts in reproductive strategy (mating system) remain comparatively poorly understood. A notable exception is the transition from exserted styles to styles with recessed positions relative to the anthers in wild tomatoes (Solanum Section Lycopersicon). This phenotypic change has been previously attributed to specific mutation in the promoter of a gene that influences...

Data from: Recent admixture generates heterozygosity-fitness correlations during the range expansion of an invading species

Stephen R. Keller, Peter D. Fields, Andrea E. Berardi & Doug R. Taylor
Admixture, the mixing of historically isolated gene pools, can have immediate consequences for the genetic architecture of fitness traits. Admixture may be especially important for newly colonized populations, such as during range expansion and species invasions, by generating heterozygosity that can boost fitness through heterosis. Despite widespread evidence for admixture during species invasions, few studies have examined the demographic history leading to admixture, how admixture affects the heterozygosity and fitness of invasive genotypes, and whether...

Data from: Spatial variation in Allee effects influences patterns of range expansion

Jonathan A. Walter, Derek M. Johnson & Kyle J. Haynes
Allee effects are thought to slow range expansion and contribute to stable range boundaries. Recent studies have shown Allee effects to vary spatiotemporally due to influences of environmental heterogeneity on population processes. Gradients in Allee effects might occur as a species' range approaches suboptimal conditions while expanding into new territory. Allee effects could exhibit patchiness if drivers of positive density dependence (e.g., mate finding rates) are influenced by habitat patchiness. However, theoretical studies have largely...

Data from: Correlation between sequence divergence and polymorphism reveals similar evolutionary mechanisms acting across multiple timescales in a rapidly evolving plastid genome

Karen B. Barnard-Kubow, Daniel B. Sloan & Laura F. Galloway
Background: Although the plastid genome is highly conserved across most angiosperms, multiple lineages have increased rates of structural rearrangement and nucleotide substitution. These lineages exhibit an excess of nonsynonymous substitutions (i.e., elevated dN/dS ratios) in similar subsets of plastid genes, suggesting that similar mechanisms may be leading to relaxed and/or positive selection on these genes. However, little is known regarding whether these mechanisms continue to shape sequence diversity at the intraspecific level. Results: We examined...

Data from: Co-occurrence and hybridization of anther-smut pathogens specialized on Dianthus hosts

Elsa Petit, Casey Silver, Amandine Cornille, Pierre Gladieux, Lisa Rosenthal, Emily Bruns, Sarah Yee, Janis Antonovics, Tatiana Giraud & Michael Hood
Host specialization has important consequences for the diversification and ecological interactions of obligate pathogens. The anther-smut disease of natural plant populations, caused by Microbotryum fungi, has been characterized by specialized host-pathogen interactions, which contribute in part to the isolation among these numerous fungal species. This study investigated the molecular variation of Microbotryum pathogens within the geographic and host-specific distributions on wild Dianthus species in southern European Alps. In contrast to prior studies on this pathogen...

Data from: Sympatry and interference of divergent Microbotryum pathogen species.

Michael E Hood, Janis Antonovics, Monroe Wolf, Zachariah L Stern, Tatiana Giraud & Jessie L Abbate
The impact of infectious diseases in natural ecosystems is strongly influenced by the degree of pathogen specialization and by the local assemblies of potential host species. This study investigated anther-smut disease, caused by fungi in the genus Microbotryum, among natural populations of plants in the Caryophyllaceae. A broad geographic survey focused on sites of the disease on multiple host species in sympatry. Analysis of molecular identities for the pathogens revealed that sympatric disease was most...

Additional references for: Brain arteriovenous malformations: a review of natural history, pathobiology, and interventions

Jason Sheehan & Ching-Jen Chen
Brain arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are anomalous direct shunts between cerebral arteries and veins that convalesce into a vascular nidus. The treatment strategies for AVMs are challenging and variable. Intracranial hemorrhage and seizures comprise the most common presentations of AVMs. However, incidental AVMs are being diagnosed with increasing frequency due to widespread use of noninvasive neuroimaging. The balance between the estimated cumulative lifetime hemorrhage risk versus the risk of intervention is often the major determinant for...

Data from: Predicting allosteric mutants that increase activity of a major antibiotic resistance enzyme

Malgorzata J. Latallo, George A. Cortina, Salem Faham, Robert K. Nakamoto & Peter Kasson
The CTX-M family of beta lactamases mediate broad-spectrum antibiotic resistance and present in the majority of drug-resistant gram-negative bacteria infections worldwide. Allosteric mutations that increase catalytic rates of these drug resistance enzymes have been identified in clinical isolates but are challenging to predict prospectively. We have used molecular dynamics simulations to predict allosteric mutants increasing CTX-M9 drug resistance, experimentally testing top mutants using multiple antibiotics. Purified enzymes show an increase in catalytic rate and efficiency,...

Data from: Temperature-dependent resetting of the molecular circadian oscillator in Drosophila.

Tadahiro Goda, Brandi Sharp & Herman Wijnen
Circadian clocks responsible for daily time keeping in a wide range of organisms synchronize to daily temperature cycles via pathways that remain poorly understood. To address this problem from the perspective of the molecular oscillator, we monitored temperature-dependent resetting of four of its core components in the fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster: the transcripts and proteins for the clock genes period (per) and timeless (tim). The molecular circadian cycle in adult heads exhibited parallel responses to temperature-mediated...

Data from: Sexual selection in a hermaphroditic plant through female reproductive success

Can Dai & Laura F. Galloway
Sexual selection is well accepted as a mechanism of shaping traits in animals. However, whether and how floral traits are sexually selected in hermaphroditic plants remains less clear. Here, we use Passiflora incarnata to address how floral traits that affect pollination success are selected via female function. We manipulated the ecological context by limiting pollination and adding resources to expand the phenotypic distribution and alter the intensity of sexual selection. Total sexual selection favoured lower...

Data from: Convergent evolution of sexual dimorphism in skull shape using distinct developmental strategies

Emma Sherratt, Joel William McGlothlin, , Jonathan B. Losos, Arhat Abzhanov, Thomas J. Sanger & Edmund D. Brodie
Studies integrating evolutionary and developmental analyses of morphological variation are of growing interest to biologists as they promise to shed fresh light on the mechanisms of morphological diversification. Sexually dimorphic traits tend to be incredibly divergent across taxa. Such diversification must arise through evolutionary modifications to sex differences during development. Nevertheless, few studies of dimorphism have attempted to synthesize evolutionary and developmental perspectives. Using geometric morphometric analysis of head shape for 50 Anolis species, we...

Data from: Phenotypic plasticity, but not adaptive tracking, underlies seasonal variation in post-cold hardening freeze tolerance of Drosophila melanogaster

Helen Stone, Priscilla Erickson & Alan Bergland
In temperate regions, an organism’s ability to rapidly adapt to seasonally varying environments is essential for its survival. In response to seasonal changes in selection pressure caused by variation in temperature, humidity, and food availability, some organisms exhibit plastic changes in phenotype. In other cases, seasonal variation in selection pressure can rapidly increase the frequency of genotypes that offer survival or reproductive advantages under the current conditions. Little is known about the relative influences of...

Registration Year

  • 2021
    7
  • 2020
    21
  • 2019
    9
  • 2018
    19
  • 2017
    9
  • 2016
    17
  • 2015
    8
  • 2014
    15
  • 2013
    4
  • 2012
    4

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    117

Affiliations

  • University of Virginia
    117
  • Amherst College
    8
  • Utah State University
    6
  • University of Kansas
    5
  • University of Pennsylvania
    5
  • Stanford University
    5
  • University of Nevada Reno
    5
  • Harvard University
    5
  • University of Georgia
    4
  • Virginia Tech
    4