112 Works

Habitat use as an indicator of adaptive capacity to climate change

Claire Teitelbaum, Alexej Siren, Ethan Coffel, Jane Foster, Jacqueline Frair, Joseph Hinton, Radley Horton, David Kramer, Corey Lesk, Colin Raymond, David Wattles, Katherine Zeller & Toni Lyn Morelli
Aim: Populations of cold-adapted species at the trailing edges of geographic ranges are particularly vulnerable to the negative effects of climate change from the combination of exposure to warm temperatures and high sensitivity to heat. Many of these species are predicted to decline under future climate scenarios, but they could persist if they can adapt to warming climates either physiologically or behaviorally. We aim to understand local variation in contemporary habitat use and use this...

Data from: Decreased brain connectivity in smoking contrasts with increased connectivity in drinking

Wei Cheng, Edmund T. Rolls, Trevor W. Robbins, Weikang Gong, Zhaowen Liu, Wujun Lv, Jingnan Du, Hongkai Wen, Liang Ma, Erin Burke Quinlan, Hugh Garavan, Eric Artiges, Dimitri Papadopoulos Orfanos, Michael N. Smolka, Gunter Schumann, Keith Kendrick & Jianfeng Feng
In a group of 831 participants from the general population in the Human Connectome Project, smokers exhibited low overall functional connectivity, and more specifically of the lateral orbitofrontal cortex which is associated with non-reward mechanisms, the adjacent inferior frontal gyrus, and the precuneus. Participants who drank a high amount had overall increases in resting state functional connectivity, and specific increases in reward-related systems including the medial orbitofrontal cortex and the cingulate cortex. Increased impulsivity was...

Data from: Temporal dynamics of the genetic clines of invasive European green crab (Carcinus maenas) in eastern North America

Sarah J. Lehnert, Claudio DiBacco, Nicholas W. Jeffery, April M.H. Blakeslee, Jonatan Isaksson, Joe Roman, Brendan F. Wringe, Ryan R.E. Stanley, Kyle Matheson, Cynthia H. McKenzie, Lorraine C. Hamilton, Ian R. Bradbury, Ryan R. E. Stanley & April M. H. Blakeslee
Two genetically distinct lineages of European green crabs (Carcinus maenas) were independently introduced to eastern North America, the first in the early 19th century and the second in the late 20th century. These lineages first came into secondary contact in southeastern Nova Scotia, Canada (NS), where they hybridized, producing latitudinal genetic clines. Previous studies have documented a persistent southward shift in the clines of different marker types, consistent with existing dispersal and recruitment pathways. We...

Data from: Genetic variation and evolution of secondary compounds in native and introduced populations of the invasive plant Melaleuca quinquenervia

Steven J. Franks, Gregory S. Wheeler & Charles J. Goodnight
We examined multivariate evolution of 20 leaf terpenoids in the invasive plant Melaleuca quinquenervia in a common garden experiment. While most compounds, including 1,8-Cineole and Viridiflorol, were reduced in home compared with invaded range genotypes, consistent with an evolutionary decrease in defense, one compound (E-Nerolidol) was greater in invaded than home range genotypes. Nerolidol was negatively genetically correlated with Cineole and Viridiflorol, and the increase in this compound in the new range may have been...

Data from: Maternal loading of a small heat shock protein increases embryo thermal tolerance in Drosophila melanogaster

Brent L. Lockwood, Cole R. Julick & Kristi L. Montooth
Maternal investment is likely to have direct effects on offspring survival. In oviparous animals whose embryos are exposed to the external environment, maternal provisioning of molecular factors like mRNAs and proteins may help embryos cope with sudden changes in the environment. Here we sought to modify the maternal mRNA contribution to offspring embryos and test for maternal effects on acute thermal tolerance in early embryos of Drosophila melanogaster. We drove in vivo overexpression of a...

Data from: Variable effects of climate on forest growth in relation to climate extremes, disturbance, and forest dynamics

Malcolm S. Itter, Andrew O. Finley, Anthony W. D'Amato, Jane R. Foster & John B. Bradford
Changes in the frequency, duration, and severity of climate extremes are forecast to occur under global climate change. The impacts of climate extremes on forest productivity and health remain difficult to predict due to potential interactions with disturbance events and forest dynamics—changes in forest stand composition, density, size and age structure over time. Such interactions may lead to non-linear forest growth responses to climate involving thresholds and lag effects. Understanding how forest dynamics influence growth...

Data from: Time-integrated habitat availability is a resource attribute that informs patterns of use in intertidal areas

Leonardo Calle, Lauri Green, Allan Strong & Dale E. Gawlik
In dynamic environments, resource availability may change by several orders of magnitude, over hours to months, but the duration of resource availability is not often included as a characteristic attribute of resources even though temporal resource dynamics might limit patterns of use. In our study of wading birds foraging in intertidal areas, tides cause large changes in the areal extent of shallow-water foraging habitat (i.e., the resource), but tides also constrain the duration of availability,...

Data from: Site-specific group selection drives locally adapted group compositions

Jonathan N. Pruitt & Charles J. Goodnight
Group selection may be defined as selection caused by the differential extinction or proliferation of groups. The socially polymorphic spider Anelosimus studiosus exhibits a behavioral polymorphism where females exhibit either a “docile” or “aggressive” behavioral phenotype. Natural colonies are composed of a mixture of related docile and aggressive individuals, and populations differ in colonies’ characteristic docile:aggressive ratios. Using experimentally-constructed colonies of known composition, we demonstrate that population-level divergence in docile:aggressive ratios is driven by site-specific...

Catastrophes, connectivity and Allee effects in the design of marine reserve networks

Easton White, Marissa Baskett & Alan Hastings
Catastrophic events, like oil spills and hurricanes, occur in many marine systems. One potential role of marine reserves is buffering populations against disturbances, including the potential for disturbance-driven population collapses under Allee effects. This buffering capacity depends on reserves in a network providing rescue effects, setting up a trade-off where reserves need to be connected to facilitate rescue, but also distributed in space to prevent simultaneous extinction. We use a set of population models to...

A target enrichment probe set for resolving the flagellate land plant tree of life

Jesse W. Breinholt, Sarah B. Carey, George P. Tiley, E. Christine Davis, Lorena Endara, Stuart F. McDaniel, Leandro Neves, Emily B. Sessa, Matt Von Konrat, Susan Fawcett, Stefanie M. Ickert-Bond, Paulo H. Labiak, Juan Larraín, Marcus Lehnert, Lily R. Lewis, Nathalie S. Nagalingum, Nikisha Patel, Stefan A. Rensing, Weston Testo, Alejandra Vasco, Juan Carlos Villarreal, Evelyn Webb Williams, J. Gordon Burleigh, Sahut Chantanaorrapint, Leandro G. Neves … & Stefanie M. Ickert‐Bond
Premise of the Study: New sequencing technologies enable the possibility of generating large-scale molecular datasets for constructing the plant tree of life. We describe a new probe set for target enrichment sequencing to generate nuclear sequence data to build phylogenetic trees with any flagellate land plants, including hornworts, liverworts, mosses, lycophytes, ferns, and all gymnosperms. Methods and Results: We leveraged existing transcriptome and genome sequence data to design a set of 56,989 probes for target...

Raw data from: Differentiating siliceous particulate matter in the diets of mammalian herbivores

Luke Fannin, Elise Laugier, Adam Van Casteren, Sabrina Greenwood & Nathaniel Dominy
1. Silica is crucial to terrestrial plant life and geochemical cycling on Earth. It is also implicated in the evolution of mammalian teeth, but there is debate over which type of siliceous particle has exerted the strongest selective pressure on tooth morphology. 2. Debate revolves around the amorphous silica bodies (phytoliths) in plants and forms of siliceous grit––i.e., crystalline quartz (sand, soil, dust)––on plant surfaces. The problem is that conventional measures of silica often quantify...

From common gardens to candidate genes: Exploring local adaptation to climate in red spruce

Thibaut Capblancq, Susanne Lachmuth, Matthew Fitzpatrick & Stephen Keller
Local adaptation to climate is common in plant species and has been studied in a range of contexts, from improving crop yields to predicting population maladaptation to future conditions. The genomic era has brought new tools to study this process, which was historically explored through common garden experiments. In this study, we combine genomic methods and common gardens to investigate local adaptation in red spruce and identify environmental gradients and loci involved in climate adaptation....

Data from: Target Sequence Capture of Nuclear-Encoded Genes for Phylogenetic Analysis in Ferns

Paul G. Wolf, Tanner A. Robison, Matthew G. Johnson, Michael A. Sundue, Weston L. Testo & Carl J. Rothfels
Premise of the study: Until recently, most phylogenetic studies of ferns were based on chloroplast genes. Evolutionary inferences based on these data can be incomplete because the characters are from a single linkage group and are uniparentally inherited. These limitations are particularly acute in studies of hybridization, which is prevalent in ferns; fern hybrids are common and ferns are able to hybridize across highly diverged lineages, up to 60 million years since divergence in one...

Data from: Salty, mild, and low plant biomass grasslands increase top-heaviness of invertebrate trophic pyramids

Ellen Welti, Lucie Kuczynski, Katharine Markse, Nathan Sanders, Kirsten De Beurs & Michael Kaspari
Aim Multiple hypotheses predict how gradients of nutrient availability, plant biomass, and temperature shape trophic pyramids. We aim to disentangle the simultaneous influence of those different factors and their indirect effects on trophic structure and individual trophic levels. Location United States Time period 2017 Major taxa studied Invertebrates Methods To examine differences in trophic pyramid shape and abundance within trophic levels across ecological gradients, we used a structural equation modeling approach to analyze 54 standardized...

The initiation and growth of transpressional shear zones through continental arc lithosphere, southwest New Zealand

Keith Klepeis, Joshua Schwartz, Elena Miranda, Peter Lindquist, Richard Jongens, Rose Turnbull & Harold Stowell
Structural analyses combined with new U-Pb zircon and titanite geochronology show how two Early Cretaceous transpressional shear zones initiated and grew through a nearly complete section of continental arc crust during oblique convergence. Both shear zones reactivated Carboniferous faults that penetrated the upper mantle below Zealandia’s Median Batholith but show opposite growth patterns and dissimilar relationships with respect to arc magmatism. The Grebe-Indecision Creek shear zone was magma-starved and first reactivated at ~136 Ma as...

Bottom-up when it is not top-down: Predators and plants control biomass of grassland arthropods

Ellen Welti, Rebecca Prather, Nate Sanders, Kirsten De Beurs & Michael Kaspari
1) We investigate where bottom-up and top-down control regulates ecological communities as a mechanism linking ecological gradients to the geography of consumer abundance and biomass. We use standardized surveys of 54 North American grasslands to test alternate hypotheses predicting 100-fold shifts in the biomass of four common grassland arthropod taxa—Auchenorrhyncha, sucking herbivores, Acrididae, chewing herbivores, Tettigoniidae, omnivores, and Araneae, predators. 2) Bottom-up models predict that consumer biomass tracks plant quantity (e.g. productivity and standing biomass)...

Data from: Retention forestry influences understory diversity and functional identity

Miranda Curzon, Christel Kern, Susan Baker, Brian Palik & Anthony D'Amato
In recent decades, a paradigm shift in forest management and associated policies has led to greater emphasis on harvest practices that retain mature, overstory trees in forest stands that would otherwise be clearcut. While it is often assumed that the maintenance of compositional and structural complexity, such as that achieved through retention forestry approaches, will also mitigate negative impacts to functional diversity, empirical evidence of this relationship is sparse. We examined the effects of an...

Global diversification of Anelosimus spiders driven by long distance overwater dispersal and Neogene climate oscillations

Ingi Agnarsson, Yufa Luo, Seok Ping Goh, Daiqin Li, Marcelo Gonzaga, Adalberto Santos, Aiko Tanikawa, Hajime Yoshida, Charles Haddad, Laura May-Collado, Eva Turk, Matjaz Gregoric & Matjaz Kuntner
Vicariance and dispersal events, combined with intricate global climatic history, have left an imprint on the spatiotemporal distribution and diversity of many organisms. Anelosimus cobweb spiders (Theridiidae), are solitary-social organisms with a cosmopolitan distribution in temperate- to-tropical areas. Their evolutionary history and the discontinuous distribution of species richness suggest that 1) long distance overwater dispersal, and 2) climate change during the Neogene (23–2.6 Ma), may be major factors in explaining their distribution and diversification. Here...

Phylogeography of the widespread Caribbean spiny orb weaver Gasteracantha cancriformis

Lisa Chamberland, Fabian C. Salgado-Roa, Alma Basco, Amanda Crastz-Flores, Greta Binford & Ingi Agnarsson
Background. Modern molecular analyses are often inconsistent with pre-cladistic taxonomic hypotheses, frequently indicating higher richness than morphological taxonomy estimates. Among Caribbean spiders, widespread species are relatively few compared to the prevalence of single island endemics. The taxonomic hypothesis Gasteracantha cancriformis circumscribes a species with profuse variation in size, color, and body form. Distributed throughout the Neotropics, G. cancriformis is the only morphological species of Gasteracantha in the New World in this globally distributed genus. Methods....

The eco-evolutionary history of Madagascar presents unique challenges to tropical forest restoration

Katherine A. Culbertson, Timothy L.H. Treuer, Ariadna Mondragon Botero, Tanjona Ramiadantsoa & J. Leighton Reid
High biodiversity and endemism combined with persistently high deforestation rates mark Madagascar as one of the hottest of biodiversity hotspots. Contemporary rising interest in large-scale reforestation, both globally and throughout Madagascar itself, presents a promising impetus for forest restoration and biodiversity conservation across the island. However, Madagascar may face unique restoration challenges due to its equally unique eco-evolutionary trajectory, which must be understood to enable successful ecological restoration. We conducted a systematic review of potential...

Pollinator visitation to Na-enriched plants

Nathan Sanders & Carrie Finkelstein
Plants have evolved a variety of approaches to attract pollinators, including enriching their nectar with essential nutrients. Because sodium is an essential nutrient for pollinators, and sodium concentration in nectar can vary both within and among species, we explored whether experimentally enriching floral nectar with sodium in five plant species would influence pollinator visitation and diversity. We found that the number of visits by pollinators increased on plants with sodium-enriched nectar, regardless of plant species,...

Data from: Global invasion history of the Tropical Fire Ant: a stowaway on the first global trade routes

Dietrich Gotzek, Heather Axen, Andrew Suarez, Sara Helms Cahan, D. DeWayne Shoemaker, Andrew V. Suarez & Heather J. Axen
Biological invasions are largely thought to be contemporary, having recently increased sharply in the wake of globalization. However, human commerce had already become global by the mid-16th century when the Spanish connected the New World with Europe and Asia via their Manila galleon and West Indies trade routes. We use genetic data to trace the global invasion of one of the world's most widespread and invasive pest ants, the Tropical Fire Ant, Solenopsis geminata. Our...

Data from: Signals of selection in conditionally expressed genes in the diversification of three horned beetles species

Melissa H. Pespeni, Jason T. Ladner & Armin P. Moczek
Species radiations may be facilitated by phenotypic differentiation already present within populations, such as those arising through sex-specific development or developmental processes biased toward particular reproductive or trophic morphs. We sought to test this hypothesis by utilizing a comparative transcriptomic approach to contrast among and within-species differentiation using three horned beetle species in the genus Onthophagus. These three species exhibit differences along three phenotypic axes reflective of much of the interspecific diversity present within the...

Data from: Asymmetric winter warming advanced plant phenology to a greater extent than symmetric warming in an alpine meadow

Ji Suonan, Aimée T. Classen, Zhenhua Zhang & Jin-Sheng He
The warming of terrestrial high-latitude ecosystems, while increasing, will likely be asymmetric across seasons – where winter non-growing seasons will warm more than summer growing seasons. Asymmetric winter warming in temperature-sensitive ecosystems may delay spring phenological events by reducing the opportunity that a plants’ chilling requirement is met. Similarly, symmetric warming can advance spring phenology. To explore the impact of asymmetric warming on plant phenology, we applied a year-round warming and a winter warming treatment...

Data from: Phylogenomics resolves a spider backbone phylogeny and rejects a prevailing paradigm for orb web evolution

Jason E. Bond, Nicole L. Garrison, Chris A. Hamilton, Rebecca L. Godwin, Marshal Hedin & Ingi Agnarsson
Spiders represent an ancient predatory lineage known for their extraordinary biomaterials, including venoms and silks. These adaptations make spiders key arthropod predators in most terrestrial ecosystems. Despite ecological, biomedical, and biomaterial importance, relationships among major spider lineages remain unresolved or poorly supported. Current working hypotheses for a spider “backbone” phylogeny are largely based on morphological evidence, as most molecular markers currently employed are generally inadequate for resolving deeper-level relationships. We present here a phylogenomic analysis...

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