9 Works

Data from: Decreased brain connectivity in smoking contrasts with increased connectivity in drinking

Wei Cheng, Edmund T. Rolls, Trevor W. Robbins, Weikang Gong, Zhaowen Liu, Wujun Lv, Jingnan Du, Hongkai Wen, Liang Ma, Erin Burke Quinlan, Hugh Garavan, Eric Artiges, Dimitri Papadopoulos Orfanos, Michael N. Smolka, Gunter Schumann, Keith Kendrick & Jianfeng Feng
In a group of 831 participants from the general population in the Human Connectome Project, smokers exhibited low overall functional connectivity, and more specifically of the lateral orbitofrontal cortex which is associated with non-reward mechanisms, the adjacent inferior frontal gyrus, and the precuneus. Participants who drank a high amount had overall increases in resting state functional connectivity, and specific increases in reward-related systems including the medial orbitofrontal cortex and the cingulate cortex. Increased impulsivity was...

Data from: New records of very high nitrous oxide fluxes from rice cannot be generalized for water management and climate impacts

Reiner Wassmann, Bjoern Ole Sander, Sudhir Yadav, Bas Bouman, Grant Singleton, Alexander Stuart, Jonathan Hellin, David Johnson, Jacqueline Hughes, Klaus Butterbach-Bahl, Ralf Kiese, David Kraus, Baldur Janz, Bruce Linquist, Yam Kanta Gaihre, Ngonidzashe Chirinda & Eva Wollenberg
This supplement aims to substantiate and expand our comments made in the Letter to the Editor. This format as a separate document was necessary due to the complexity of the issues raised in our comments vis-à-vis the word limit of PNAS Letters (500 words). The text elaborates on individual concerns raised in the letter and also adds new aspects on the research quality that have not yet been discussed in the letter. Moreover, the supplement...

Data from: Long-term population dynamics of dreissenid mussels (Dreissena polymorpha and D. rostriformis): a cross-system analysis

David L. Strayer, Boris V. Adamovich, Rita Adrian, David C. Aldridge, Csilla Balogh, Lyubov E. Burlakova, Hannah B. Fried-Petersen, László G.‐Tóth, Amy L. Hetherington, Thomas S. Jones, Alexander Y. Karatayev, Jacqueline B. Madill, Oleg A. Makarevich, J. Ellen Marsden, Andre L. Martel, Dan Minchin, Thomas F. Nalepa, Ruurd Noordhuis, Timothy J. Robinson, Lars G. Rudstam, Astrid N. Schwalb, David R. Smith, Alan D. Steinman & Jonathan M. Jeschke
Dreissenid mussels (including the zebra mussel Dreissena polymorpha and the quagga mussel D. rostriformis) are among the world's most notorious invasive species, with large and widespread ecological and economic effects. However, their long‐term population dynamics are poorly known, even though these dynamics are critical to determining impacts and effective management. We gathered and analyzed 67 long‐term (>10 yr) data sets on dreissenid populations from lakes and rivers across Europe and North America. We addressed five...

Data from: Functional form and interactions of the drivers of understory non-native plant invasions in northern US forests

Marina Golivets, Christopher W. Woodall & Kimberly F. Wallin
1. The number and rate of non-native plant invasions in forests have been steadily increasing over the last century with profound consequences for the composition, structure and functioning of these ecosystems. While multiple regional, landscape and local environmental factors are known to drive the spread of non-native invasive plant species (NNIPS) into forests, such factors have rarely been analysed within a unified analytical framework allowing for the assessment of their relative importance, possible nonlinear behaviour,...

Data from: Mediterranean marine protected areas have higher biodiversity via increased evenness, not abundance

Shane Blowes, Jonathan Chase, Antonio Di Franco, Ori Frid, Nicholas Gotelli, Paolo Guidetti, Tiffany Knight, Felix May, Daniel McGlinn, Fiorenza Micheli, Enric Sala & Jonathan Belmaker
1. Protected areas are central to biodiversity conservation. For marine fish, marine protected areas (MPAs) often harbour more individuals, especially of species targeted by fisheries. But precise pathways of biodiversity change remain unclear. For example, how local-scale responses combine to affect regional biodiversity, important for managing spatial networks of MPAs, is not well known. Protection potentially influences three components of fish assemblages that determine how species accumulate with sampling effort and spatial scale: the total...

Assessing the Ecological Impacts of Biomass Harvesting along a Disturbance Severity Gradient

Valerie Kurth, Anthony D'Amato, John Bradford, Brian Palik & Christopher Looney
Disturbance is a central driver of forest development and ecosystem processes with variable effects within and across ecosystems. Despite the high levels of variation in disturbance severity often observed in forests following natural and anthropogenic disturbance, studies quantifying disturbance impacts often rely on categorical classifications, thus limiting opportunities to examine potential gradients in ecosystem response to a given disturbance or management regime. Given the potential increases in disturbance severity associated with global change, as well...

Multi-scale landscape genetics of American marten at their southern range periphery

Cody Aylward, James Murdoch & C. William Kilpatrick
American marten (Martes americana) are a conservation priority in many forested regions of North America. Populations are fragmented at the southern edge of their distribution due to suboptimal habitat conditions. Facilitating gene flow may improve population resilience through genetic and demographic rescue. We used a multi-scale approach to estimate the relationship between genetic connectivity and landscape characteristics among individuals at three scales in the northeastern United States: regional, subregional, and local. We integrated multiple modeling...

Long-term monitoring reveals forest tree community change driven by atmospheric sulfate pollution and contemporary climate change

Brittany Verrico, Jeremy Weiland, Timothy Perkins, Brian Beckage & Stephen Keller
Aim: Montane environments are sentinels of global change, providing unique opportunities to assess impacts on species diversity. Multiple anthropogenic stressors such as climate change and atmospheric pollution may act concurrently or synergistically in restructuring communities. Thus, a major challenge for conservation is untangling the relative importance of different stressors. Here, we combine long-term monitoring with multivariate community modeling to estimate the anthropogenic drivers shaping forest tree diversity along an elevational gradient. Location: Camels Hump Mountain,...

Data from: Release from natural enemies mitigates inbreeding depression in native and invasive Silene latifolia populations

Karin Schrieber, Sabrina Wolf, Catherina Wypior, Diana Höhlig, Stephen R. Keller, Isabell Hensen & Susanne Lachmuth
Inbreeding and enemy infestation are common in plants and can synergistically reduce their performance. This inbreeding × environment (I×E) interaction may be of particular importance for the success of plant invasions if introduced populations experience a release from attack by natural enemies relative to their native conspecifics. Here, we investigate whether inbreeding affects plant infestation damage, whether inbreeding depression in growth and reproduction is mitigated by enemy release and whether this effect is more pronounced...

Registration Year

  • 2019
    9

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    9

Affiliations

  • University of Vermont
    9
  • University of Cambridge
    2
  • United States Geological Survey
    2
  • University of California, Davis
    2
  • Grand Valley State University
    1
  • College of Charleston
    1
  • Shanghai University
    1
  • Stanford University
    1
  • University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
    1
  • CoNISMa
    1