28 Works

Data from: Stability of the gorilla microbiome despite simian immunodeficiency virus infection

Andrew H. Moeller, Martine Peeters, Ahidjo Ayouba, Eitel Mpoudi Ngole, Amadine Esteban, Beatrice H. Hahn & Howard Ochman
Simian immunodeficiency viruses (SIVs) have been discovered in over 45 primate species; however, the pathogenic potential of most SIV strains remains unknown due to difficulties inherent in observing wild populations. Because those SIV infections that are pathogenic have been shown to induce changes in the host's gut microbiome, monitoring the microbiota present in faecal samples can provide a noninvasive means for studying the effects of SIV infection on the health of wild-living primates. Here, we...

Data from: Nurse-based restoration of degraded tropical forests with tussock grasses: experimental support from the Andean cloud forest

Fabien Anthelme, Lorena Gómez-Aparicio & Rommel Montúfar
1. The degradation of the Andean cloud forest raises strong biological conservation issues and threatens the sustainability of a crucial water resource. The idea that nurse-based restoration can accelerate the recovery of these forests is underexplored, despite its promise as a restoration technique. Recent conceptual models predict that facilitation among plants may be an important mechanism, but there is a lack of strong empirical support. We gathered experimental data to test this prediction and explore...

Data from: Worldwide patterns of genetic differentiation imply multiple \"domestications\" of Aedes aegypti, a major vector of human diseases

Julia E. Brown, Carolyn S. McBride, Petrina Johnson, Scott Ritchie, Christophe Paupy, Hervé Bossin, Joel Lutomiah, Ildefonso Fernandez-Salas, Alongkot Ponlawat, Anthony J. Cornel, William C. Black, Norma Gorrochotegui-Escalante, Ludmel Urdaneta-Marquez, Massamba Sylla, Michel Slotman, Kristy O. Murray, Christopher Walker, Jeffrey R. Powell, P. Johnson, S. Ritchie, W. C. Black, N. Gorrochotegui-Escalante, M. Sylla, L. Urdaneta-Marquez, J. E. Brown … & M. Slotman
Understanding the processes by which species colonize and adapt to human habitats is particularly important in the case of disease-vectoring arthropods. The mosquito species Aedes aegypti, a major vector of dengue and yellow fever viruses, probably originated as a wild, zoophilic species in sub-Saharan Africa, where some populations still breed in tree holes in forested habitats. Many populations of the species, however, have evolved to thrive in human habitats and to bite humans. This includes...

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