2 Works

Data from: Worldwide patterns of genetic differentiation imply multiple \"domestications\" of Aedes aegypti, a major vector of human diseases

Julia E. Brown, Carolyn S. McBride, Petrina Johnson, Scott Ritchie, Christophe Paupy, Hervé Bossin, Joel Lutomiah, Ildefonso Fernandez-Salas, Alongkot Ponlawat, Anthony J. Cornel, William C. Black, Norma Gorrochotegui-Escalante, Ludmel Urdaneta-Marquez, Massamba Sylla, Michel Slotman, Kristy O. Murray, Christopher Walker, Jeffrey R. Powell & W. C. Black
Understanding the processes by which species colonize and adapt to human habitats is particularly important in the case of disease-vectoring arthropods. The mosquito species Aedes aegypti, a major vector of dengue and yellow fever viruses, probably originated as a wild, zoophilic species in sub-Saharan Africa, where some populations still breed in tree holes in forested habitats. Many populations of the species, however, have evolved to thrive in human habitats and to bite humans. This includes...

Data from: Worldwide patterns of genetic differentiation imply multiple \"domestications\" of Aedes aegypti, a major vector of human diseases

Julia E. Brown, Carolyn S. McBride, Petrina Johnson, Scott Ritchie, Christophe Paupy, Hervé Bossin, Joel Lutomiah, Ildefonso Fernandez-Salas, Alongkot Ponlawat, Anthony J. Cornel, William C. Black, Norma Gorrochotegui-Escalante, Ludmel Urdaneta-Marquez, Massamba Sylla, Michel Slotman, Kristy O. Murray, Christopher Walker, Jeffrey R. Powell, P. Johnson, S. Ritchie, W. C. Black, N. Gorrochotegui-Escalante, M. Sylla, L. Urdaneta-Marquez, J. E. Brown … & M. Slotman
Understanding the processes by which species colonize and adapt to human habitats is particularly important in the case of disease-vectoring arthropods. The mosquito species Aedes aegypti, a major vector of dengue and yellow fever viruses, probably originated as a wild, zoophilic species in sub-Saharan Africa, where some populations still breed in tree holes in forested habitats. Many populations of the species, however, have evolved to thrive in human habitats and to bite humans. This includes...

Registration Year

  • 2010
    2

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    2

Affiliations

  • Institut de Recherche pour le Développement
    2
  • Texas A&M University
    2
  • Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León
    2
  • The University of Texas Health Science Center at Tyler
    2
  • Armed Forces Research Institute of Medical Science
    2
  • Colorado State University
    2
  • Yale University
    2
  • Rockefeller University
    2
  • James Cook University
    2
  • Kenya Medical Research Institute
    2