9 Works

Data from: Scale-dependent foraging ecology of a marine top predator modelled using passive acoustic data

Enrico Pirotta, Paul M. Thompson, Peter I. Miller, Kate L. Brookes, Barbara Cheney, Tim R. Barton, Isla M. Graham & David Lusseau
1. Understanding which environmental factors drive foraging preferences is critical for the development of effective management measures, but resource use patterns may emerge from processes that occur at different spatial and temporal scales. Direct observations of foraging are also especially challenging in marine predators, but passive acoustic techniques provide opportunities to study the behavior of echolocating species over a range of scales. 2. We used an extensive passive acoustic dataset to investigate the distribution and...

Data from: Decomposing variation in male reproductive success: age-specific variances and covariances through extra-pair and within-pair reproduction

Christophe Lebigre, Peter Arcese & Jane M. Reid
1. Age-specific variances and covariances in reproductive success shape the total variance in lifetime reproductive success (LRS), age-specific opportunities for selection, and population demographic variance and effective size. Age-specific (co)variances in reproductive success achieved through different reproductive routes must therefore be quantified to predict population, phenotypic and evolutionary dynamics in age-structured populations. 2. While numerous studies have quantified age-specific variation in mean reproductive success, age-specific variances and covariances in reproductive success, and the contributions of...

Data from: High flight costs, but low dive costs, in auks support the biomechanical hypothesis for flightlessness in penguins

Kyle H. Elliott, Robert E. Ricklefs, Anthony J. Gaston, Scott A. Hatch, John R. Speakman & Gail K. Davoren
Flight is a key adaptive trait. Despite its advantages, flight has been lost in several groups of birds, notably among seabirds, where flightlessness has evolved independently in at least five lineages. One hypothesis for the loss of flight among seabirds is that animals moving between different media face tradeoffs between maximizing function in one medium relative to the other. In particular, biomechanical models of energy costs during flying and diving suggest that a wing designed...

Data from: Short-term disturbance by a commercial two-dimensional seismic survey does not lead to long-term displacement of harbour porpoises

Paul M. Thompson, Kate L. Brookes, Isla M. Graham, Tim R. Barton, Keith Needham, Gareth Bradbury & Nathan D. Merchant
Assessments of the impact of offshore energy developments are constrained because it is not known whether fine-scale behavioral responses to noise lead to broader-scale displacement of protected small cetaceans. We used passive acoustic monitoring and digital aerial surveys to study changes in the occurrence of harbour porpoises across a 2000 km2 study area during a commercial 2-D seismic survey in the North Sea. Acoustic and visual data provided evidence of group responses to air-gun noise...

Data from: Accelerometry predicts daily energy expenditure in a bird with high activity levels

Kyle H. Elliott, Maryline LeVaillant, Akiko Kato, John Speakman, Yan Ropert-Coudert, M. Le Vaillant & J. R. Speakman
Animal ecology is shaped by energy costs, yet it is difficult to measure fine-scale energy expenditure in the wild. Because metabolism is often closely correlated with mechanical work, accelerometers have the potential to provide detailed information on energy expenditure of wild animals over fine temporal scales. Nonetheless, accelerometry needs to be validated on wild animals, especially across different locomotory modes. We merged data collected on 20 thick-billed murres (Uria lomvia) from miniature accelerometers with measurements...

Data from: Deleterious consequences of antioxidant supplementation on lifespan in a wild-derived mammal

Colin Selman, Jane S. McLaren, Andrew R. Collins, Garry G. Duthie & John R. Speakman
While oxidative damage due to reactive oxygen species (ROS) often increases with advancing age and is associated with many age-related diseases, its causative role in ageing is controversial. In particular, studies that have attempted to modulate ROS-induced damage, either upwards or downward, using antioxidant or genetic approaches, generally do not show a predictable effect on lifespan. Here we investigated whether dietary supplementation with either vitamin E (α-tocopherol) or vitamin C (ascorbic acid) affected oxidative damage...

Data from: A well-constrained estimate for the timing of the salmonid whole genome duplication reveals major decoupling from species diversification

Daniel J. Macqueen & Ian A. Johnston
Whole genome duplication (WGD) is often considered to be mechanistically associated with species diversification. Such ideas have been anecdotally attached to a WGD at the stem of the salmonid fish family, but remain untested. Here, we characterized an extensive set of gene paralogues retained from the salmonid WGD, in species covering the major lineages (subfamilies Salmoninae, Thymallinae and Coregoninae). By combining the data in calibrated relaxed molecular clock analyses, we provide the first well-constrained and...

Data from: Pedigree error due to extra-pair reproduction substantially biases estimates of inbreeding depression

Jane M. Reid, Lukas F. Keller, Amy B. Marr, Pirmin Nietlisbach, Rebecca J. Sardell & Peter Arcese
Understanding the evolutionary dynamics of inbreeding and inbreeding depression requires unbiased estimation of inbreeding depression across diverse mating systems. However, studies estimating inbreeding depression often measure inbreeding with error, for example, based on pedigree data derived from observed parental behavior that ignore paternity error stemming from multiple mating. Such paternity error causes error in estimated coefficients of inbreeding (f) and reproductive success and could bias estimates of inbreeding depression. We used complete “apparent” pedigree data...

Data from: Divergent evolutionary processes associated with colonization of offshore islands

Natália Martínková, Ross Barnett, Thomas Cucchi, Rahel Struchen, Marine Pascal, Michel Pascal, Martin C. Fischer, Thomas Higham, Selina Brace, Simon Y. W. Ho, Jean-Pierre Quéré, Paul O'Higgins, Laurent Excoffier, Gerald Heckel, A. Rus Hoelzel, Keith M. Dobney & Jeremy B. Searle
Oceanic islands have been a test ground for evolutionary theory, but here, we focus on the possibilities for evolutionary study created by offshore islands. These can be colonized through various means and by a wide range of species, including those with low dispersal capabilities. We use morphology, modern and ancient sequences of cytochrome b (cytb) and microsatellite genotypes to examine colonization history and evolutionary change associated with occupation of the Orkney archipelago by the common...

Registration Year

  • 2013
    9

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    9

Affiliations

  • University of Aberdeen
    9
  • University of Manitoba
    2
  • University of British Columbia
    2
  • University of Bath
    1
  • Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics
    1
  • University of Glasgow
    1
  • University of Nottingham
    1
  • Hubert Curien Multi-disciplinary Institute
    1
  • Durham University
    1
  • French National Institute for Agricultural Research
    1