26 Works

Sub-hourly discharge data for the Siksik catchment, North West Territories, Canada from September 2009 to September 2010

D. Tetzlaff, J. Lessels & P. Wookey
Data comprise sub-hourly discharge measurements including mean stream height, discharge and stream temperature collected at station S2 on the Siksik stream, North West Territories, Canada, between September 2009 and March 2010. Measurements were taken at a field site based at SikSik Creek a small sub-catchment of the Trail Valley Creek, approximately 60km north of Inuvik. The data were collected under Project HYDRA, a NERC funded UK research project linking Heriot Watt University, the Universities of...

Data from: Variation in parent-offspring kinship in socially monogamous systems with extra-pair reproduction and inbreeding

Jane M. Reid, Greta Bocedi, Pirmin Nietlisbach, Alexander Bradley Duthie, Matthew Ernest Wolak, Elizabeth A. Gow & Peter Arcese
Female extra-pair reproduction in socially monogamous systems is predicted to cause cuckolded socially-paired males to conditionally reduce paternal care, causing selection against extra-pair reproduction and underlying polyandry. However, existing models and empirical studies have not explicitly considered that cuckolded males might be related to their socially-paired female and/or to her extra-pair mate, and therefore be related to extra-pair offspring that they did not sire but could rear. Selection against paternal care, and hence against extra-pair...

Data from: Harvested populations are more variable only in more variable environments

Tom C. Cameron, Daniel O'Sullivan, Alan Reynolds, Joseph P. Hicks, Stuart B. Piertney & Tim G. Benton
The interaction between environmental variation and population dynamics is of major importance, particularly for managed and economically important species, and especially given contemporary changes in climate variability. Recent analyses of exploited animal populations contested whether exploitation or environmental variation has the greatest influence on the stability of population dynamics, with consequences for variation in yield and extinction risk. Theoretical studies however have shown that harvesting can increase or decrease population variability depending on environmental variation,...

Data from: Echolocation detections and digital video surveys provide reliable estimates of the relative density of harbour porpoises

Laura D. Williamson, Kate L. Brookes, Beth E. Scott, Isla M. Graham, Gareth Bradbury, Philip S. Hammond & Paul M. Thompson
1. Robust estimates of the density or abundance of cetaceans are required to support a wide range of ecological studies and inform management decisions. Considerable effort has been put into the development of line-transect sampling techniques to obtain estimates of absolute density from aerial and boat-based visual surveys. Surveys of cetaceans using acoustic loggers or digital cameras provide alternative methods to estimate relative density that have the potential to reduce cost and provide a verifiable...

Data from: Accounting for genetic differences among unknown parents in microevolutionary studies: how to include genetic groups in quantitative genetic animal models

Matthew E. Wolak & Jane M. Reid
Quantifying and predicting microevolutionary responses to environmental change requires unbiased estimation of quantitative genetic parameters in wild populations. ‘Animal models’, which utilize pedigree data to separate genetic and environmental effects on phenotypes, provide powerful means to estimate key parameters and have revolutionized quantitative genetic analyses of wild populations. However, pedigrees collected in wild populations commonly contain many individuals with unknown parents. When unknown parents are non-randomly associated with genetic values for focal traits, animal model...

Data from: Modeling effects of nonbreeders on population growth estimates

Aline M. Lee, Jane M. Reid & Steven R. Beissinger
Adult individuals that do not breed in a given year occur in a wide range of natural populations. However, such nonbreeders are often ignored in theoretical and empirical population studies, limiting our knowledge of how nonbreeders affect realized and estimated population dynamics and potentially impeding projection of deterministic and stochastic population growth rates. We present and analyse a general modelling framework for systems where breeders and nonbreeders differ in key demographic rates, incorporating different forms...

Data from: Experimental icing affects growth, mortality, and flowering in a high Arctic dwarf shrub

Jos M. Milner, Øystein Varpe, René Van Der Wal & Brage Bremset Hansen
Effects of climate change are predicted to be greatest at high latitudes, with more pronounced warming in winter than summer. Extreme mid-winter warm spells and heavy rain-on-snow events are already increasing in frequency in the Arctic, with implications for snow-pack and ground-ice formation. These may in turn affect key components of Arctic ecosystems. However, the fitness consequences of extreme winter weather events for tundra plants are not well understood, especially in the high Arctic. We...

Data from: Food supplementation mitigates dispersal-dependent differences in nest defence in a passerine bird.

Charlotte Récapet, Grégory Daniel, Joëlle Taroni, Pierre Bize & Blandine Doligez
Dispersing and non-dispersing individuals often differ in phenotypic traits (e.g. physiology, behaviour), but to what extent these differences are fixed or driven by external conditions remains elusive. We experimentally tested whether differences in nest-defence behaviour between dispersing and non-dispersing individuals changed with local habitat quality in collared flycatchers, by providing additional food during the nestling rearing period. In control (non-food-supplemented) nests, dispersers were less prone to defend their brood compared with non-dispersers, whereas in food-supplemented...

Data from: Direct and indirect genetic and fine-scale location effects on breeding date in song sparrows

Ryan R. Germain, Matthew E. Wolak, Peter Arcese, Sylvain Losdat & Jane M. Reid
Quantifying direct and indirect genetic effects of interacting females and males on variation in jointly expressed life-history traits is central to predicting microevolutionary dynamics. However, accurately estimating sex-specific additive genetic variances in such traits remains difficult in wild populations, especially if related individuals inhabit similar fine-scale environments. Breeding date is a key life-history trait that responds to environmental phenology and mediates individual and population responses to environmental change. However, no studies have estimated female (direct)...

Data from: Genome-wide association study of behavioral, physiological and gene expression traits in outbred CFW mice

Clarissa C. Parker, Shyam Gopalakrishnan, Peter Carbonetto, Natalia M. Gonzales, Emily Leung, Yeonhee J. Park, Emmanuel Aryee, Joe Davis, David A. Blizard, Cheryl L. Ackert-Bicknell, Arimantas Lionikas, Jonathan K. Pritchard & Abraham A. Palmer
Although mice are the most widely used mammalian model organism, genetic studies have suffered from limited mapping resolution due to extensive linkage disequilibrium (LD) that is characteristic of crosses among inbred strains. Carworth Farms White (CFW) mice are a commercially available outbred mouse population that exhibit rapid LD decay in comparison to other available mouse populations. We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of behavioral, physiological and gene expression phenotypes using 1,200 male CFW mice....

Data from: State-space modelling of geolocation data reveals sex differences in the use of management areas by breeding northern fulmars

Ewan W. J. Edwards, Lucy R. Quinn & Paul M. Thompson
Effective management and conservation of terrestrially breeding marine predators requires information on connectivity between specific breeding sites and at-sea foraging areas. In the north-east Atlantic, efforts to monitor and manage the impacts of bycatch or pollution events within different Convention for the Protection of the Marine Environment of the North-East Atlantic (OSPAR) management regions are currently constrained by uncertainty over the origins of seabirds occurring in each area. Whilst Global Positioning System (GPS) loggers can...

Data from: The evolutionary relationships and age of Homo naledi: an assessment using dated Bayesian phylogenetic methods

Mana Dembo, Davorka Radovčić, Heather M. Garvin, Myra F. Laird, Lauren Schroeder, Jill E. Scott, Juliet Brophy, Rebecca R. Ackermann, Charles M. Musiba, Darryl J. De Ruiter, Arne Ø. Mooers, Mark Collard & Chares M. Musiba
Homo naledi is a recently discovered species of fossil hominin from South Africa. A considerable amount is already known about H. naledi but some important questions remain unanswered. Here we report a study that addressed two of them: “Where does H. naledi fit in the hominin evolutionary tree?” and “How old is it?” We used a large supermatrix of craniodental characters for both early and late hominin species and Bayesian phylogenetic techniques to carry out...

Soil pH and bulk density depth profiles in the Siksik catchment, North West Territories, Canada

D. Tetzlaff, J. Lessels & P. Wookey
Data comprise pH and bulk density measurements (location (longitude, latitude), depth, bulk density) for multiple soil profiles in the SikSik catchment, North West Territories, Canada. Samples were collected along a transect in September 2014. Soil samples were taken near additional soil pits. Soil depth and sampling location (latitude and longitude) was recorded. Bulk density was determined according to Blake and Hartge (1986). pH was determined with the 1:5 soil:water suspension method (see supporting documentation). The...

Meteorological data for the Siksik catchment, North West Territories, Canada for 2013 and 2014

D. Tetzlaff, J. Lessels & P. Wookey
Data comprise meterological measurements (mean, minimum and maximum daily air temperature, minimum and maximum daily relative humidity, wind speed (kilometres per second at 10metres height), dew point temperature, estimated actual vapour pressure, precipitation, estimated surface resistance, estimated albedo and estimated Potential evapotranspiration (PET)) for the Siksik catchment, North West Territories, Canada for 2013 and 2014. The data were collected under Project HYDRA, a NERC funded UK research project linking Heriot Watt University, the Universities of...

Data from: The core planar cell polarity gene, Vangl2, directs adult corneal epithelial cell alignment and migration

Amy S. Findlay, D. Alessio Panzica, Petr Walczysko, Amy B. Holt, Deborah J. Henderson, John D. West, Ann M. Rajnicek & J. Martin Collinson
This study shows that the core planar cell polarity (PCP) genes direct the aligned cell migration in the adult corneal epithelium, a stratified squamous epithelium on the outer surface of the vertebrate eye. Expression of multiple core PCP genes was demonstrated in the adult corneal epithelium. PCP components were manipulated genetically and pharmacologically in human and mouse corneal epithelial cells in vivo and in vitro. Knockdown of VANGL2 reduced the directional component of migration of...

Data from: Genetic structure in the European endemic seabird, Phalacrocorax aristotelis, was shaped by a complex interaction of historical and contemporary, physical and non-physical drivers

Evanthia Thanou, Stefano Sponza, Emily J. Nelson, Annika Perry, Sarah Wanless, Francis Daunt & Stephen Cavers
Geographically separated populations tend to be less connected by gene flow, as a result of physical or non-physical barriers preventing dispersal, and this can lead to genetic structure. In this context, highly mobile organisms such as seabirds are interesting because the small effect of physical barriers means non-physical ones may be relatively more important. Here we use microsatellite and mitochondrial data to explore the genetic structure and phylogeography of Atlantic and Mediterranean populations of a...

Data from: Plant connectivity underlies plant-pollinator-exploiter distributions in Ficus petiolaris and associated pollinating and non-pollinating fig wasps

Alexander Duthie, John D. Nason & A. Bradley Duthie
Mutualism is ubiquitous in nature, and nursery pollination mutualisms provide a system well suited to quantifying the benefits and costs of symbiotic interactions. In nursery pollination mutualisms, pollinators reproduce within the inflorescence they pollinate, with benefits and costs being measured in the numbers of pollinator offspring and seeds produced. This type of mutualism is also typically exploited by seed-consuming non-pollinators that obtain resources from plants without providing pollination services. Theory predicts that the rate at...

Data from: Evidence of the phenotypic expression of a lethal recessive allele under inbreeding in a wild population of conservation concern

Amanda E. Trask, Eric M. Bignal, Davy I. McCracken, Pat Monaghan, Stuart B. Piertney & Jane M. Reid
Deleterious recessive alleles that are masked in outbred populations are predicted to be expressed in small, inbred populations, reducing both individual fitness and population viability. However, there are few definitive examples of phenotypic expression of lethal recessive alleles under inbreeding conditions in wild populations. Studies that demonstrate the action of such alleles, and infer their distribution and dynamics, are required to understand their potential impact on population viability and inform management responses. The Scottish population...

Data from: When does female multiple mating evolve to adjust inbreeding? Effects of inbreeding depression, direct costs, mating constraints, and polyandry as a threshold trait

Alexander Bradley Duthie, Greta Bocedi & Jane M. Reid
Polyandry is often hypothesized to evolve to allow females to adjust the degree to which they inbreed. Multiple factors might affect such evolution, including inbreeding depression, direct costs, constraints on male availability, and the nature of polyandry as a threshold trait. Complex models are required to evaluate when evolution of polyandry to adjust inbreeding is predicted to arise. We used a genetically explicit individual-based model to track the joint evolution of inbreeding strategy and polyandry...

Data from: Selective disappearance of individuals with high levels of glycated haemoglobin in a free-living bird

Charlotte Récapet, Adélaïde Sibeaux, Laure Cauchard, Blandine Doligez & Pierre Bize
Although disruption of glucose homeostasis is a hallmark of ageing in humans and laboratory model organisms, we have little information on the importance of this process in free-living animals. Poor control of blood glucose levels leads to irreversible protein glycation. Hence, levels of protein glycation are hypothesized to increase with age and to be associated with a decline in survival. We tested these predictions by measuring blood glycated haemoglobin in 274 adult collared flycatchers of...

Data from: Marker-dependent associations among oxidative stress, growth and survival during early life in a wild mammal

Louise L. Christensen, Colin Selman, Jonathan D. Blount, Jill G. Pilkington, Kathryn A. Watt, Josephine M. Pemberton, Jane M. Reid & Daniel H. Nussey
Oxidative stress (OS) is hypothesized to be a key physiological mechanism mediating life-history trade-offs, but evidence from wild populations experiencing natural environmental variation is limited. We tested the hypotheses that increased early life growth rate increases OS, and that increased OS reduces first-winter survival, in wild Soay sheep (Ovis aries) lambs. We measured growth rate and first-winter survival for four consecutive cohorts, and measured two markers of oxidative damage (malondialdehyde (MDA), protein carbonyls (PC)) and...

Data from: Quantifying pursuit-diving seabirds' associations with fine-scale physical features in tidal stream environments

James J. Waggitt, Pierre W. Cazenave, Ricardo Torres, Benjamin J. Williamson & Beth E. Scott
The rapid increase in the number of tidal stream turbine arrays will create novel and unprecedented levels of anthropogenic activity within habitats characterized by horizontal current speeds exceeding 2 ms−1. However, the potential impacts on pursuit-diving seabirds exploiting these tidal stream environments remain largely unknown. Identifying similarities between the fine-scale physical features (100s of metres) suitable for array installations, and those associated with foraging pursuit-diving seabirds, could identify which species are most vulnerable to either...

Data from: Food availability and predation risk, rather than intrinsic attributes are the main factors shaping the reproductive decisions of a long-lived predator

Sarah R. Hoy, Alexandre Millon, Steve J. Petty, D Philip Whitfield & Xavier Lambin
Deciphering the causes of variation in reproductive success is a fundamental issue in ecology, as the number of offspring produced is an important driver of individual fitness and population dynamics. Little is known however, about how different factors interact to drive variation in reproduction, such as whether an individual's response to extrinsic conditions (e.g. food availability or predation) varies according to its intrinsic attributes (e.g. age, previous allocation of resources towards reproduction). We used 29...

Data from: Gene expression under thermal stress varies across a geographic range expansion front

Lesley Lancaster, Rachael Dudaniec, Pallavi Chauhan, Maren Wellenreuther, Erik Svensson, Bengt Hansson, Lesley T. Lancaster, Rachael Y. Dudaniec & Erik I. Svensson
Many ectothermic species are currently expanding their distributions polewards due to anthropogenic global warming. Molecular genetic mechanisms facilitating range expansion under these conditions are largely unknown, but understanding these could help mitigate expanding pests and disease vectors, or help explain why some species fail to track changing climates. Here, using RNA-seq data, we examine genome-wide changes in gene expression under heat and cold stress in the range-expanding damselfly Ischnura elegans in northern Europe. We find...

Data from: Lifespan and reproductive cost explain interspecific variation in the optimal onset of reproduction

Emeline Mourocq, Pierre Bize, Sandra Bouwhuis, Russell Bradley, Anne Charmantier, Carlos De La Cruz, Szymon Marian Obniak, Richard H. M. Espie, Márton Herenyi, Hermann Hötker, Oliver Kruger, John Marzluff, Anders P. Møller, Shinichi Nakagawa, Richard A. Phillips, Andrew N. Radford, Alexandre Roulin, János Török, Juliana Valencia, Martijn Van De Pol, Ian G. Warkentin, Isabel S. Winney, Andrew G. Wood, Michael Griesser & Szymon M. Drobniak
Fitness can be profoundly influenced by the age at first reproduction (AFR), but to date the AFR-fitness relationship only has been investigated intraspecifically. Here we investigated the relationship between AFR and average lifetime reproductive success (LRS) across 34 bird species. We assessed differences in the deviation of the Optimal AFR (i.e., the species-specific AFR associated with the highest LRS) from the age at sexual maturity, considering potential effects of life-history as well as social and...

Registration Year

  • 2016
    26

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    26

Affiliations

  • University of Aberdeen
    26
  • French National Centre for Scientific Research
    4
  • University of Glasgow
    2
  • University of Lausanne
    2
  • University of Edinburgh
    2
  • University of Zurich
    2
  • University of British Columbia
    2
  • Bangor University
    1
  • Centre d'Ecologie Fonctionnelle et Evolutive
    1
  • University of Washington
    1