6 Works

Data from: Blocking human contaminant DNA during PCR allows amplification of rare mammal species from sedimentary ancient DNA

Sanne Boessenkool, Laura S. Epp, James Haile, Eva Bellemain, Mary Edwards, Eric Coissac, Eske Willerslev & Christian Brochmann
Analyses of degraded DNA are typically hampered by contamination, especially when employing universal primers such as commonly used in environmental DNA studies. In addition to false-positive results, the amplification of contaminant DNA may cause false-negative results due to competition, or bias, during the PCR. In this study, we test the utility of human-specific blocking primers in mammal diversity analyses of ancient permafrost samples from Siberia. Using quantitative PCR (qPCR) on human and mammoth DNA we...

Data from: A comparative study of ancient sedimentary DNA, pollen and macrofossils from permafrost sediments of northern Siberia reveals long-term vegetational stability

Tina Jørgensen, James Haile, Per Möller, Andrei Andreev, Sanne Boessenkool, Morten Rasmussen, Frank Kienast, Eric Coissac, Pierre Taberlet, Christian Brochmann, Nancy H. Bigelow, Kenneth Andersen, Ludovic Orlando, M. Thomas P. Gilbert & Eske Willerslev
Although ancient DNA from sediments (sedaDNA) has been used to investigate past ecosystems, the approach has never been directly compared to the traditional methods of pollen and macrofossil analysis. We conducted a comparative survey of 18 ancient permafrost samples spanning the Late Pleistocene (46–12.5 thousand years ago), from the Taymyr Peninsula in northern Siberia. The results show that pollen, macrofossils and sedaDNA are complementary rather than overlapping, and in combination reveal more detailed information on...

Data from: Islands in the ice: detecting past vegetation on Greenlandic nunataks using historical records and sedimentary ancient DNA meta-barcoding

Tina Jørgensen, Kurt H Kjær, James Haile, Morten Rasmussen, Sanne Boessenkool, Kenneth Andersen, Eric Coissac, Pierre Taberlet, Christian Brochmann, Ludovic Orlando, M. Thomas P. Gilbert & Eske Willerslev
Nunataks are isolated bedrocks protruding through ice sheets. They vary in age, but represent island environments in “oceans” of ice through which organism dispersals and replacements can be studied over time. The J.A.D. Jensen’s Nunataks at the southern Greenland ice sheet are the most isolated nunataks on the northern hemisphere - some 30 km from the nearest biological source. They constitute around 2 km2 of ice-free land that was established in the early Holocene. We...

Data from: A comparative study of ancient sedimentary DNA, pollen and macrofossils from permafrost sediments of northern Siberia reveals long-term vegetational stability

Tina Jørgensen, James Haile, Per Möller, Andrei Andreev, Sanne Boessenkool, Morten Rasmussen, Frank Kienast, Eric Coissac, Pierre Taberlet, Christian Brochmann, Nancy H. Bigelow, Kenneth Andersen, Ludovic Orlando, M. Thomas P. Gilbert & Eske Willerslev
Although ancient DNA from sediments (sedaDNA) has been used to investigate past ecosystems, the approach has never been directly compared to the traditional methods of pollen and macrofossil analysis. We conducted a comparative survey of 18 ancient permafrost samples spanning the Late Pleistocene (46–12.5 thousand years ago), from the Taymyr Peninsula in northern Siberia. The results show that pollen, macrofossils and sedaDNA are complementary rather than overlapping, and in combination reveal more detailed information on...

Data from: Islands in the ice: detecting past vegetation on Greenlandic nunataks using historical records and sedimentary ancient DNA meta-barcoding

Tina Jørgensen, Kurt H Kjær, James Haile, Morten Rasmussen, Sanne Boessenkool, Kenneth Andersen, Eric Coissac, Pierre Taberlet, Christian Brochmann, Ludovic Orlando, M. Thomas P. Gilbert & Eske Willerslev
Nunataks are isolated bedrocks protruding through ice sheets. They vary in age, but represent island environments in “oceans” of ice through which organism dispersals and replacements can be studied over time. The J.A.D. Jensen’s Nunataks at the southern Greenland ice sheet are the most isolated nunataks on the northern hemisphere - some 30 km from the nearest biological source. They constitute around 2 km2 of ice-free land that was established in the early Holocene. We...

Data from: Blocking human contaminant DNA during PCR allows amplification of rare mammal species from sedimentary ancient DNA

Sanne Boessenkool, Laura S. Epp, James Haile, Eva Bellemain, Mary Edwards, Eric Coissac, Eske Willerslev & Christian Brochmann
Analyses of degraded DNA are typically hampered by contamination, especially when employing universal primers such as commonly used in environmental DNA studies. In addition to false-positive results, the amplification of contaminant DNA may cause false-negative results due to competition, or bias, during the PCR. In this study, we test the utility of human-specific blocking primers in mammal diversity analyses of ancient permafrost samples from Siberia. Using quantitative PCR (qPCR) on human and mammoth DNA we...

Registration Year

  • 2011
    6

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    6

Affiliations

  • Natural History Museum
    6
  • University of Oslo
    6
  • French National Centre for Scientific Research
    4
  • University of Cologne
    2
  • Lund University
    2
  • University of Alaska Fairbanks
    2
  • University of Southampton
    2
  • Laboratoire d'Écologie Alpine
    2