2 Works

Data from: Barrier bednets target malaria vectors and expand the range of usable insecticides

Gregory P.D. Murray, Natalie Lissenden, Jeff Jones, Vitaly Voloshin, K. Hyacinthe Toé, Ellie Sherrard-Smith, Geraldine M. Foster, Thomas S. Churcher, Josephine E.A. Parker, Catherine E. Towers, Sagnon N’Falé, Wamdaogo M. Guelbeogo, Hilary Ranson, David Towers & Philip J. McCall
Transmission of Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasites occurs when nocturnal Anopheles mosquito vectors feed on human blood. In Africa, where malaria burden is greatest, bednets treated with pyrethroid insecticide were highly effective in preventing mosquito bites and reducing transmission, and essential to achieving unprecedented reductions in malaria until 2015. Since then, progress has stalled and with insecticidal bednets losing efficacy against pyrethroid-resistant Anopheles vectors, methods that restore performance are urgently needed to eliminate any risk of...

Plasmodium falciparum gametocyte density and infectivity in peripheral blood and skin tissue of naturally infected parasite carriers in Burkina Faso

Teun Bousema, Elamaran Meibalan, Aissata Barry, Matthew Gibbins, Shehu Awandu, Lisette Meerstein-Kessel, Fiona Achar, Selina Bopp, Christopher Moxon, Amidou Diarra, Siaka Debe, Nicolas Ouedraogo, Ines Barry-Some, Emilie Badoum, Traore Fagnima, Kjerstin Lanke, Bronner Goncalves, John Bradley, Dyann Wirth, Chris Drakeley, Wamdaogo Guelbeogo, Alfred Tiono, Matthias Marti, Matthew P Gibbins, Fiona Achcar … & Alfred B Tiono
Background Plasmodium falciparum transmission depends on mature gametocytes that can be ingested by mosquitoes taking a blood meal on human skin. Although gametocyte skin sequestration has long been hypothesized as important contributor to efficient malaria transmission, this has never been formally tested. Methods In naturally infected gametocyte carriers from Burkina Faso, we assessed infectivity to mosquitoes by direct skin feeding and membrane feeding. We directly quantified male and female gametocytes and asexual parasites in finger-prick...

Registration Year

  • 2021
    1
  • 2019
    1

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    2

Affiliations

  • African Training and Research Centre in Administration for Development
    2
  • London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine
    1
  • University of Glasgow
    1
  • University of Warwick
    1
  • Institut de Cancérologie de l'Ouest
    1
  • Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine
    1
  • Harvard Medical School
    1
  • Centre National de Recherche et de Formation sur le Paludisme
    1
  • Imperial College London
    1
  • Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre
    1