203 Works

Data from: Spatial heterogeneity in species composition constrains plant community responses to herbivory and fertilization

Dorothee Hodapp, Elizabeth T. Borer, W. Stanley Harpole, Eric M. Lind, Eric W. Seabloom, Peter B. Adler, Juan Alberti, Carlos A. Arnillas, Jonathan D. Bakker, Lori Biederman, Marc Cadotte, Elsa E. Cleland, Scott Collins, Philip A. Fay, Jennifer Firn, Nicole Hagenah, Yann Hautier, Oscar Iribarne, Johannes M.H. Knops, Rebecca L. McCulley, Andrew MacDougall, Joslin L. Moore, John W. Morgan, Brent Mortensen, Kimberly J. La Pierre … & Johannes M. H. Knops
Environmental change can result in substantial shifts in community composition. The associated immigration and extinction events are likely constrained by the spatial distribution of species. Still, studies on environmental change typically quantify biotic responses at single spatial (time series within a single plot) or temporal (spatial beta-diversity at single time points) scales, ignoring their potential interdependence. Here, we use data from a global network of grassland experiments to determine how turnover responses to two major...

Data from: Acquisition of obligate mutualist symbionts during the larval stage is not beneficial for a coral host

Aaron Hartmann, Kristen Marhaver, Anke Klueter, Michael Lovci, Collin Closek, Erika Diaz Almeyda, Valerie Chamberland, Frederick Archer, Dimitri Deheyn, Mark Vermeij & Monica Medina
Theory suggests that the direct transmission of endosymbionts from parents to offspring (vertical transmission) in animal hosts is advantageous and evolutionarily stable, yet many host species instead acquire their symbionts from the environment (horizontal acquisition). An outstanding question in marine biology is why some scleractinian corals do not provision their eggs and larvae with the endosymbiotic dinoflagellates that are necessary for a juvenile’s ultimate survival. We tested whether the acquisition of photosynthetic endosymbionts (family Symbiodiniaceae)...

Data from: Cognitive function and mood at high altitude following acclimatization and use of supplemental oxygen and adaptive servoventilation sleep treatments

Erica C. Heinrich, Matea A. Djokic, Dillon Gilbertson, Pamela N. DeYoung, Naa-Oye Bosompra, Lu Wu, Cecilia Y. Anza-Ramirez, Jeremy E. Orr, Frank L. Powell, Atul Malhotra & Tatum S. Simonson
Impairments in cognitive function, mood, and sleep quality occur following ascent to high altitude. Low oxygen (hypoxia) and poor sleep quality are both linked to impaired cognitive performance but their independent contributions at high altitude remain unknown. Adaptive servoventilation (ASV) improves sleep quality by stabilizing breathing and preventing central apneas without supplemental oxygen. We compared the efficacy of ASV and supplemental oxygen sleep treatments for improving daytime cognitive function and mood in high-altitude visitors (N...

Contract design thinking: a service oriented architecture SOA for contract models, maintenance and testing

Christopher Felker & Sue Ahl
Contract variances complicate academic medical center accounts receivables because they are one driver of ambiguity when calculating future free cash flows FFCF [1]. UC Health provides leadership and strategic direction for UC’s five academic medical centers and 18 health professional schools. Contract variations within 1 (one) medical center has a multiplier effect in the consolidated annual financial reporting. In December 2017 we created an internal project charter [2] to consolidate contracts financial accounts receivables activity...

Revenue design thinking: constructing an accelerated cash /phased write down story

Christopher Felker
A well-designed data story is a launch point for revenue cycle professionals using analytics to manage accounts receivable according to portfolio principles. In the last 100 (one hundred) days before the close of a fiscal year, holding accounts receivables too long poses an inordinate risk on the perceived value of UCSD Health's trial balance inventory. In April 2018, we started to design a Tableau dashboard that would more accurately forecast two things First Future free...

Data from: A 3,000 year record of Caribbean reef urchin communities reveals causes and consequences of long-term decline in Diadema antillarum

Katie L. Cramer, Aaron O'Dea, Carolina Carpenter & Richard D. Norris
Urchins are the last abundant grazers of macroalgae on most Caribbean reefs following the historical overexploitation of herbivorous fishes. The long-spined urchin Diadema antillarum was particularly effective at controlling macroalgae and facilitating coral dominance on Caribbean reefs until its ecological extinction from a catastrophic disease epidemic in the early 1980s. Despite their important role in the structure and functioning of Caribbean reef ecosystems, the natural dynamics of Caribbean reef urchin communities are poorly known due...

Data from: When should we expect early bursts of trait evolution in comparative data? Predictions from an evolutionary food web model

Travis Ingram, Luke J. Harmon & Jonathan B. Shurin
Conceptual models of adaptive radiation predict that competitive interactions among species will result in an early burst of speciation and trait evolution followed by a slowdown in diversification rates. Empirical studies often show early accumulation of lineages in phylogenetic trees, but usually fail to detect early bursts of phenotypic evolution. We use an evolutionary simulation model to assemble food webs through adaptive radiation, and examine patterns in the resulting phylogenetic trees and species' traits (body...

Data from: Host coevolution alters the adaptive landscape of a virus

Alita R. Burmeister, Richard E. Lenski & Justin R. Meyer
The origin of new and complex structures and functions is fundamental for shaping the diversity of life. Such key innovations are rare because they require multiple interacting changes. We sought to understand how the adaptive landscape led to an innovation whereby bacteriophage λ evolved the new ability to exploit a receptor, OmpF, on Escherichia coli cells. Previous work showed that this ability evolved repeatedly, despite requiring four mutations in one virus gene. Here, we examine...

Data from: Precisely timed theta oscillations are selectively required during the encoding phase of memory

Stefan Leutgeb, Jill K Leutgeb, Clare R Quirk, Ipshita Zutshi, Sunandha Srikanth, Maylin L Fu, Naomie Devico Marciano, Morgan K Wright, Darian F Parsey, Stanley Liu, Rachel E Siretskiy & Tiffany L Huynh
Brain oscillations have been hypothesized to support cognitive function by coordinating spike timing within and across brain regions, yet it is often not known when timing is either critical for neural computations or an epiphenomenon. The entorhinal cortex and hippocampus are necessary for learning and memory and exhibit prominent theta oscillations (6–9 Hz), which are controlled by pacemaker cells in the medial septal area. Here we show that entorhinal and hippocampal neuronal activity patterns were...

Iron sulfides and anomalous electrical resistivity in cratonic environments: electrical resistivity data set

Anne Pommier
The interpretation of low-resistivity anomalies in the lithospheric mantle of several cratonic regions has invoked hydrogen, or connected networks of graphite with iron-rich silicates, and/or metal sulfides. Electrical laboratory measurements are a powerful approach for exploring these alternatives. We report electrical measurements of two xenoliths (pyroxenite and dunite) from Tanzania; two metal sulfides (FeS and Fe-S-Ni); and several mixtures of metal sulfides (3.4–18.2 vol.%) with xenolith. A multi- anvil press was employed to maintain a...

Data from: Coupling between motor cortex and striatum increases during sleep over long-term skill learning

Stefan Lemke, Dhakshin Ramanathan, David Darevsky, Dan Egert, Josh Berke & Karunesh Ganguly
The strength of cortical connectivity to the striatum influences the balance between behavioral variability and stability. Learning to consistently produce a skilled action requires plasticity in corticostriatal connectivity associated with repeated training of the action. However, it remains unknown whether such corticostriatal plasticity occurs during training itself or “offline” during time away from training, such as sleep. Here, we monitor the corticostriatal network throughout long-term skill learning in rats and find that non-REM (NREM) sleep...

DEPP: Deep learning enables extending species trees using single genes

Yueyu Jiang, Metin Balaban, Qiyun Zhu & Siavash Mirarab
Placing new sequences onto reference phylogenies is increasingly used for analyzing environmental samples, especially microbiomes. However, existing placement methods have a fundamental limitation: they assume that query sequences have evolved using specific models directly on the reference phylogeny. Thus, they can place single-gene data (e.g., 16S rRNA amplicons) onto their own gene tree. This practice is a proxy for a more ambitious goal: extending a (genome-wide) species tree given data from individual genes. No algorithm...

Supporting Information: Toward learned chemical perception of force field typing rules

Camila Zanette, Caitlin C. Bannan, Christopher I. Bayly, Josh Fass, Michael K. Gilson, Michael R. Shirts, John D. Chodera & David L. Mobley
The Open Force Field Initiative seeks to to automate force field development in order to advance force fields and improve accuracy (openforcefield.org). An important part of this effort includes automating the determination of chemical perception --- that is, the way force field parameters are assigned to a molecule based on chemical environment. We developed a novel technology for this purpose, termed SMARTY. It generalizes atom typing by using direct chemical perception with SMARTS strings adopting...

Training and Support for Student Library Employees in a Tiered Reference Service Model: Supporting Materials

Brian Quigley, Jeffery Loo, Lisa Ngo, Susan Powell, Samantha Teplitzky, Anna Sackmann & Kortney Rupp
To cultivate students’ reference skills, the Engineering and Physical Sciences Division of the UC Berkeley Library developed an active training program based upon a dynamic online reference manual continuously improved with student feedback. We evaluate the effectiveness of our training program and share procedures and tools for enhancing student training. Students were given a pre-test of reference skills and self-efficacy prior to attending an annual training session. One month afterwards, we distributed a post-test and...

Drivers and projections of global surface temperature anomalies at the local scale

Susanne Benz, Steven Davis & Jennifer Burney
More than half of the world’s population now lives in urban areas, and trends in rural-to-urban migration are expected to continue through the end of the century. Although cities create efficiencies that drive innovation and economic growth, they also alter the local surface energy balance, resulting in urban temperatures that can differ dramatically from surrounding areas. Here we introduce a global 1-km resolution data set of seasonal and diurnal anomalies in urban surface temperatures relative...

Data from: The role of feeding morphology and competition in governing the diet breadth of sympatric stomatopod crustaceans

Maya S. DeVries
Competition for food drives divergence and specialization in feeding morphology. Stomatopod crustaceans have two kinds of highly specialized feeding appendages: either elongate spear-like appendages (spearers) used to ambush soft-bodied evasive prey or hammer-like appendages (smashers) that produce extremely high forces used both to break hard-shelled prey and to capture evasive prey. To evaluate associations between appendage type and feeding ecology, the diet of two small smasher and spearer species (size range: 21–27 mm) that co-occur...

Data from: Gradual loading ameliorates maladaptation in computational simulations of vein graft growth and remodelling

Abhay Bangalore Ramachandra, Jay D. Humphrey & Alison L. Marsden
Vein graft failure is a prevalent problem in vascular surgeries, including bypass grafting and arteriovenous fistula procedures in which veins are subjected to severe changes in pressure and flow. Animal and clinical studies provide significant insight, but understanding the complex underlying coupled mechanisms can be advanced using computational models. Towards this end, we propose a new model of venous growth and remodelling (G&R) based on a constrained mixture theory. First, we identify constitutive relations and...

Data from: A phylogenomic resolution of the sea urchin tree of life

Nicolás Mongiardino Koch, Simon E. Coppard, Harilaos A. Lessios, Derek E.G. Briggs, Rich Mooi & Greg W. Rouse
Background: Echinoidea is a clade of marine animals including sea urchins, heart urchins, sand dollars and sea biscuits. Found in benthic habitats across all latitudes, echinoids are key components of marine communities such as coral reefs and kelp forests. A little over 1,000 species inhabit the oceans today, a diversity that traces its roots back at least to the Permian. Although much effort has been devoted to elucidating the echinoid tree of life using a...

Data from: Limited trophic partitioning among sympatric delphinids off a tropical oceanic atoll

Hillary Young, Katherine Nigro, Douglas J. McCauley, Lisa T. Ballance, Erin M. Oleson & Simone Baumann-Pickering
Understanding trophic relationships among marine predators in remote environments is challenging, but it is critical to understand community structure and dynamics. In this study, we used stable isotope analysis of skin biopsies to compare the isotopic, and thus, trophic niches of three sympatric delphinids in the waters surrounding Palmyra Atoll, in the Central Tropical Pacific: the melon-headed whale (Peponocephala electra), Gray’s spinner dolphin (Stenella longirostris longirostris), and the common bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus). δ15N values...

Data from: Towards automated annotation of benthic survey images: variability of human experts and operational modes of automation

Oscar Beijbom, Peter J. Edmunds, Chris Roelfsema, Jennifer Smith, David I. Kline, Benjamin Neal, Matthew J. Dunlap, Vincent Moriarty, Tung-Yung Fan, Chih-Jui Tan, Stephen Chan, Tali Treibitz, Anthony Gamst, B. Greg Mitchell, David Kriegman & Benjamin P. Neal
Global climate change and other anthropogenic stressors have heightened the need to rapidly characterize ecological changes in marine benthic communities across large scales. Digital photography enables rapid collection of survey images to meet this need, but the subsequent image annotation is typically a time consuming, manual task. We investigated the feasibility of using automated point-annotation to expedite cover estimation of the 17 dominant benthic categories from survey-images captured at four Pacific coral reefs. Inter- and...

Data from: The role of aedeagus size and shape in failed mating interactions among recently diverged taxa in the Drosophila mojavensis species cluster

Maxi Polihronakis Richmond
Background: Investigating the evolution of species-specific insect genitalia is central to understanding how morphological diversification contributes to reproductive isolation and lineage divergence. While many studies evoke some form of sexual selection to explain genitalia diversity, the basis of selection and the mechanism of heterospecific mate exclusion remains vague. I conducted reciprocal mate pair trials in the Drosophila mojavensis species cluster to quantify the frequency of failed insemination attempts, historically referred to as pseudocopulation, between lineages...

Data from: Species and hybrid identification of sturgeon caviar: a new molecular approach to detect illegal trade

Elisa Boscari, Anna Barmintseva, Jose Martin Pujolar, P. Doukakis, Nikolai Mugue & Leonardo Congiu
Overexploitation of wild populations due to the high economic value of caviar has driven sturgeons to near extinction. The high prices commanded by caviar on world markets have made it a magnet for illegal and fraudulent caviar trade, often involving low-value farmed caviar being sold as top-quality caviar. We present a new molecular approach for the identification of pure sturgeon species and hybrids that are among the most commercialized species in Europe and North America....

Data from: Acid secretion by the boring organ of the burrowing giant clam, Tridacna crocea

Richard W. Hill, Eric J. Armstrong, Kazuo Inaba, Masaya Morita, Martin Tresguerres, Jonathon H. Stillman, Jinae N. Roa & Garfield T. Kwan
The giant clam Tridacna crocea, native to Indo-Pacific coral reefs, is noted for its unique ability to bore fully into coral rock and is a major agent of reef bioerosion. However, T. crocea’s mechanism of boring has remained a mystery despite decades of research. By exploiting a new, two-dimensional pH-sensing technology and manipulating clams to press their presumptive boring tissue (the pedal mantle) against pH-sensing foils, we show that this tissue lowers the pH of...

Data from: Frost sensitivity of leaves and flowers of subalpine plants is related to tissue type and phenology

Paul J. CaraDonna & Justin A. Bain
Harsh abiotic conditions–such as low temperatures that lead to spring and summer frost events in high-elevation and high-latitude ecosystems–can have strong negative consequences for plant growth, survival, and reproduction. Despite the predicted increase in episodic frost events under continued climate change in some ecosystems, our general understanding of the factors associated with frost sensitivity of reproductive and vegetative plant structures in natural plant communities is limited. The timing of growth and reproduction may be an...

Data from: Geographic population structure of the African malaria vector Anopheles gambiae suggests a role for the forest-savannah biome transition as a barrier to gene flow

Joao Pinto, Alexander Egyir-Yawson, José L. Vicente, Bruno Gomes, Federica Santalomazza, Marta Moreno, Jacques D. Charlwood, Frederic Simard, Nohal Elissa, David Weetman, Martin J. Donnelly, Adalgisa Caccone, Alessandra Della Torre, Caccone A, Simard F, Pinto J, Vicente JL, Gomes B, Elissa N, Weetman D & Donnelly MJ
The primary Afrotropical malaria mosquito vector Anopheles gambiae sensu stricto has a complex population structure. In western Africa, this species is split into two molecular forms and displays local and regional variation in chromosomal arrangements and behaviours. To investigate patterns of macro-geographic population substructure, 25 An. gambiae samples from 12 African countries were genotyped at 13 microsatellite loci. This analysis detected the presence of additional population structuring, with the M-form being subdivided into distinct west,...

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