203 Works

Data from: The Nearctic Nedubini: the most basal lineage of katydids is resolved among the paraphyletic “Tettigoniinae” (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae)

Jeffrey A. Cole & Bo Huey Chiang
This study investigated the systematics of the Nearctic shield-back katydids (“Tettigoniinae”), a paraphyletic group thought to include genera from a distinctive Gondwanan tribe, the Nedubini, among an otherwise Holarctic fauna. From exemplars of five genera of Nedubini and the majority of other genera of Nearctic “Tettigoniinae,” five gene regions were sequenced, aligned with publicly available sequence data that represent diverse subfamilies of Tettigoniidae, and subjected to phylogenetic analysis under Bayesian and likelihood criteria. Our results...

Data from: Social behavior in bees influences the abundance of Sodalis (Enterobacteriaceae) symbionts

Benjamin E. R. Rubin, Jon G. Sanders, Kyle M. Turner, Naomi E. Pierce & Sarah D. Kocher
Social interactions can facilitate transmission of microbes between individuals, reducing variation in gut communities within social groups. Thus, the evolution of social behaviors and symbiont community composition have the potential to be tightly linked. We explored this connection by characterizing the diversity of bacteria associated with both eusocial and solitary bee species within the behaviorally variable family Halictidae using 16S amplicon sequencing. Contrary to expectations, we found few differences in bacterial abundance or variation between...

Data from: Rapid evolution of thermal plasticity in mountain lake Daphnia populations

Hamanda B. Cavalheri, Celia C. Symons, Marika Schulhof, Natalie T. Jones & Jonathan B. Shurin
Populations at risk of extinction due to climate change may be rescued by adaptive evolution or plasticity. Selective agents, such as introduced predators, may enhance or constrain plastic or adaptive responses to temperature. We tested responses of Daphnia to temperature by collecting populations from lakes across an elevational gradient in the presence and absence of fish predators (long-term selection). We subsequently grew these populations at two elevations in field mesocosms over two years (short-term selection),...

Data from: Evolution of organismal stoichiometry in a long-term experiment with Escherichia coli

Caroline B. Turner, Brian D. Wade, Justin R. Meyer, Brooke A. Sommerfeld & Richard E. Lenski
Organismal stoichiometry refers to the relative proportion of chemical elements in the biomass of organisms, and it can have important effects on ecological interactions from population to ecosystem scales. Although stoichiometry has been studied extensively from an ecological perspective, much less is known about the rates and directions of evolutionary changes in elemental composition. We measured carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus content of 12 Escherichia coli populations that evolved under controlled carbon-limited, serial-transfer conditions for 50...

Data from: Stress response, gut microbial diversity, and sexual signals correlate with social interactions

Iris I. Levin, David M. Zonana, Bailey K. Fosdick, Se Jin Song, Rob Knight & Rebecca J. Safran
Theory predicts that social interactions are dynamically linked to phenotype. Yet because social interactions are difficult to quantify, little is known about the precise details on how interactivity is linked to phenotype. Here, we deployed proximity loggers on North American barn swallows (Hirundo rustica erythrogaster) to examine intercorrelations among social interactions, morphology and features of the phenotype that are sensitive to the social context: stress-induced corticosterone (CORT) and gut microbial diversity. We analysed relationships at...

Data from: The effect of keystone individuals on collective outcomes can be mediated through interactions or behavioral persistence

Noa Pinter-Wollman, Carl Nick Keiser, Roy Wollman & Jonathan Pruitt
Collective behavior emerges from interactions among group members who often vary in their behavior. The presence of just one or a few keystone individuals, such as leaders or tutors, may have a large effect on collective outcomes. These individuals can catalyze behavioral changes in other group members, thus altering group composition and collective behavior. The influence of keystone individuals on group function may lead to trade-offs between ecological situations, because the behavioral composition they facilitate...

Analysis of ancestry heterozygosity suggests that hybrid incompatibilities in threespine stickleback are environment-dependent

Ken Thompson, Catherine Peichel, Diana Rennison, Matthew McGee, Arianne Albert, Timothy Vines, Anna Greenwood, Abigail Wark, Yaniv Brandvain, Molly Schumer & Dolph Schluter
Hybrid incompatibilities occur when interactions between opposite-ancestry alleles at different loci reduce the fitness of hybrids. Most work on incompatibilities has focused on those that are 'intrinsic', meaning they affect viability and sterility in the laboratory. Theory predicts that ecological selection can also underlie hybrid incompatibilities, but tests of this hypothesis using sequence data are scarce. In this article, we compiled genetic data for F2 hybrid crosses between divergent populations of threespine stickleback fish (Gasterosteus...

Data accompanying manuscript: Allometric analysis of brain cell number in Hymenoptera suggests ant brains diverge from general trends

R Keating Godfrey, Mira Swartzlander & Gronenberg Wulfila
Many comparative neurobiological studies seek to connect sensory or behavioral attributes across taxa with differences in their brain composition. Such studies can only be interpreted in a meaningful way if the general brain-body relationships are known on a larger taxonomic scale. Recent studies in vertebrates suggest cell number and density may be better correlated with behavioral ability than brain mass or volume, but few estimates of such figures exist for insects. Here we use the...

Data from: Monitoring spawning activity in a southern California marine protected area using molecular identification of fish eggs

Alice E. Harada, Elise A. Lindgren, Maiko C. Hermsmeier, Peter A. Rogowski, Eric Terrill & Ronald S. Burton
In order to protect the diverse ecosystems of coastal California, a series of marine protected areas (MPAs) have been established. The ability of these MPAs to preserve and potentially enhance marine resources can only be assessed if these habitats are monitored through time. This study establishes a baseline for monitoring the spawning activity of fish in the MPAs adjacent to Scripps Institution of Oceanography (La Jolla, CA, USA) by sampling fish eggs from the plankton....

Data from: Electrophoretic mobility confirms reassortment bias among geographic isolates of segmented RNA phages

Samuel L. Díaz-Muñoz, Olivier Tenaillon, Daniel Goldhill, Kristen Brao, Paul E. Turner & Lin Chao
Background: Sex presents evolutionary costs and benefits, leading to the expectation that the amount of genetic exchange should vary in conditions with contrasting cost-benefit equations. Like eukaryotes, viruses also engage in sex, but the rate of genetic exchange is often assumed to be a relatively invariant property of a particular virus. However, the rates of genetic exchange can vary within one type of virus according to geography, as highlighted by phylogeographic studies of cystoviruses. Here...

Data from: Evaluating the impact of domestication and captivity on the horse gut microbiome

Jessica L. Metcalf, Se Jin Song, James T. Morton, Sophie Weiss, Andaine Seguin-Orlando, Frédéric Joly, Claudia Feh, Pierre Taberlet, Eric Coissac, Amnon Amir, Eske Willerslev, Rob Knight, Valerie McKenzie & Ludovic Orlando
The mammal gut microbiome, which includes host microbes and their respective genes, is now recognized as an essential second genome that provides critical functions to the host. In humans, studies have revealed that lifestyle strongly influences the composition and diversity of the gastrointestinal microbiome. We hypothesized that these trends in humans may be paralleled in mammals subjected to anthropogenic forces such as domestication and captivity, in which diets and natural life histories are often greatly...

Data from: Phylogenetic conservatism in plant phenology

T. Jonathan Davies, Elizabeth M. Wolkovich, Nathan J. B. Kraft, Nicolas Salamin, Jenica M. Allen, Toby R. Ault, Julio L. Betancourt, Kjell Bolmgren, Elsa E. Cleland, Benjamin I. Cook, Theresa M. Crimmins, Susan J. Mazer, Gregory J. McCabe, Stephanie Pau, Jim Regetz, Mark D. Schwartz & Steven E. Travers
Phenological events – defined points in the life cycle of a plant or animal – have been regarded as highly plastic traits, reflecting flexible responses to various environmental cues. The ability of a species to track, via shifts in phenological events, the abiotic environment through time might dictate its vulnerability to future climate change. Understanding the predictors and drivers of phenological change is therefore critical. Here, we evaluated evidence for phylogenetic conservatism – the tendency...

Response diversity in corals: hidden differences in bleaching mortality among cryptic Pocillopora species

Scott Burgess, Erika Johnston, Alex Wyatt, James Leichter & Peter Edmunds
Variation among functionally similar species in their response to environmental stress buffers ecosystems from changing states. Functionally similar species may often be cryptic species representing evolutionarily distinct genetic lineages that are morphologically indistinguishable. However, the extent to which cryptic species differ in their response to stress, and could therefore provide a source of response diversity, remains unclear because they are often not identified or are assumed to be ecologically equivalent. Here, we uncover differences in...

Introgressive hybridization erodes morphological divergence between lentic and lotic habitats in an endangered minnow

Henry Baker, Danielle C. Hankins & Jonathan Shurin
Introgressive hybridization may erode phenotypic divergence along environmental gradients, collapsing locally adapted populations into a hybrid swarm. Alternatively, introgression may promote phenotypic divergence by providing variation on which natural selection can act. In freshwater fishes, water flow often selects for divergent morphological traits in lake versus stream habitats. We tested the effects of introgression on lake-stream morphological divergence in the minnow Owens Tui Chub (Siphateles bicolor snyderi), which has been rendered endangered by introgression from...

Supplementary data for: Reproductive deficits induced by prenatal anti-Mullerian hormone exposure require androgen receptor in kisspeptin cells

Karen Tonsfeldt, Emily Ho, Chengxian Shi, Michelle He, Ryan Nguyen, Genevieve Ryan & Pamela Mellon
Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common reproductive disorder characterized by elevated androgens and anti-Mullerian hormone (AMH). These hormones remain elevated throughout pregnancy, and potential effects of hormone exposure on offspring from women with PCOS remain largely unexplored. Expanding on recent reports of prenatal AMH exposure in mice, we have fully characterized the reproductive consequences of prenatal AMH (pAMH) exposure throughout the lifespan of first- and second-generation offspring of both sexes. We also sought to...

Genesis locations of the costliest atmospheric rivers impacting the Western United States (insurance claim data)

Hamish Prince
Atmospheric rivers (ARs) are responsible for the vast majority (approximately 88%) of flood damage in the Western U.S, an annual average of USD$1.1 billion. Here, using historical flood insurance data, we investigate the genesis characteristics of damaging ARs in the Western U.S. ARs exceeding USD$20 million in damage (90th percentile), are shown to travel further across the Pacific Ocean, with median genesis locations 8° to 27° further westward compared to typical ARs. Identifying regions of...

Efficient light‐harvesting of mesophotic corals is facilitated by coral optical traits

Netanel Kramer, Raz Tamir, Or Ben Zvi, Steven Jacques, Yossi Loya & Daniel Wangpraseurt
Sustained light-dependent coral reef communities can be found at a wide range of light environments, extending from the sea level to as deep as 150 m (i.e., mesophotic). How mesophotic corals thrive despite extremely limited light conditions still requires further investigation. Here, we undertook a comprehensive ecophysiological and bio-optical study on four depth-generalist coral species aiming to delineate the functional role that optical trait-properties have in light-harvesting, at contrasting light regimes. We show that the...

Timing the SARS-CoV-2 index case in Hubei Province

Jonathan Pekar & Joel Wertheim
Understanding when SARS-CoV-2 emerged is critical to evaluating our current approach to monitoring novel zoonotic pathogens and understanding the failure of early containment and mitigation efforts for COVID-19. We employed a coalescent framework to combine retrospective molecular clock inference with forward epidemiological simulations to determine how long SARS-CoV-2 could have circulated prior to the time of the most recent common ancestor. Our results define the period between mid-October and mid-November 2019 as the plausible interval...

Mapfile and ASV table of whole-body and shell-surface samples from geminate species of gastropods separated by the Isthmus of Panama

Alexander Neu
The rise of the Isthmus of Panama ~3.5 mya separated populations of many marine organisms, which then diverged into new geminate sister species currently living in the Eastern Pacific Ocean and Caribbean Sea. However, we know very little about how such evolutionary divergences of host species have shaped their microbiomes. Here, we compared the microbiomes of whole-body and shell-surface samples of geminate species of marine gastropods in the genera Cerithiumand Cerithideopsis to those of congeneric...

Pico-phytoplankton abundance, growth and grazing rates along 110°E in the eastern Indian Ocean

Michael Landry & Selph Karen
Dilution experiments were conducted on R/V Investigator cruise IN2019v03 (17 May to 5 June 2019) on a south-to-north transect along longitude 110°E, west of Australia. Population abundances were measured by flow cytometry. Instantaneous rates of growth and grazing mortality were calculated from 2-treatment dilution incubations at six light levels.

No state change in pelagic fish production and biodiversity during the Eocene-Oligocene Transition

Elizabeth Sibert, Michelle Zill, Ella Frigyik & Richard Norris
The Eocene-Oligocene (E/O) boundary ~33.9 million years ago, has been described as a state change in the Earth system marked by the permanent glaciation of Antarctica and a proposed increase in oceanic productivity. Here we quantified the response of fish production and biodiversity to this event using microfossil fish teeth (ichthyoliths) in seven deep-sea sediment cores from around the world. Ichthyolith accumulation rate (a proxy for fish biomass production) shows no synchronous trends across the...

Indirect actuation reduces flight power requirements in Manduca sexta via elastic energy exchange

Jeff Gau, Nick Gravish & Simon Sponberg
In many insects, wing movements are generated indirectly via exoskeletal deformations. Measurements of inertial and aerodynamic power suggest that elastic recovery of energy between wingstrokes might reduce power requirements of flight. We tested three questions. 1) Can the thorax itself provide significant energy return? 2) Does a simple damped elastic model describe the bulk mechanical behavior? and 3) Are different regions of the thorax specialized for elastic energy exchange? We measured deformation mechanics of the...

Data from: Stressed connections: cortisol levels following acute psychosocial stress disrupt affiliative mimicry in humans

Jonas P. Nitschke, Cecile S. Sunahara, Evan W. Carr, Piotr Winkielman, Jens C. Pruessner & Jennifer A. Bartz
Mimicry, and especially spontaneous facial mimicry, is a rudimentary element of social–emotional experience that is well-conserved across numerous species. Although such mimicry is thought to be a relatively automatic process, research indicates that contextual factors can influence mimicry, especially in humans. Here, we extend this work by investigating the effect of acute psychosocial stress on spontaneous facial mimicry. Participants performed a spontaneous facial mimicry task with facial electromyography (fEMG) at baseline and approximately one month...

Uneven substrates constrain walking speed in ants through modulation of stride frequency more than stride length

Glenna Clifton, David Holway & Nick Gravish
Natural terrain is rarely flat. Substrate irregularities challenge walking animals to maintain stability, yet we lack quantitative assessments of walking performance and limb kinematics on naturally uneven ground. We measured how continually uneven 3D-printed substrates influence walking performance of Argentine ants by measuring walking speeds of workers from lab colonies and by testing colony-wide substrate preference in field experiments. Tracking limb motion in over 8,000 videos, we used statistical models that associate walking speed with...

Replication Files for Nutrition and the Gut Microbiota in 10–18-Month Old Children Living in Urban Slums of Mumbai, India

Samantha Huey, Aparna Thorat, Varsha Thakker, Julia L. Finkelstein, Lingjing Jiang, Marcus Fedarko, Daniel McDonald, Cameron Martino, Farhana Ali, David G. Russell, Harsha Chopra, Kripa Rajagopalan, Jere Douglas Haas, Rob Knight, S.A. Udipi & P. Ghugre

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