34 Works

Data from: Two pulses of morphological diversification in Pacific pelagic fishes following the Cretaceous–Palaeogene mass extinction

Elizabeth Sibert, Matthew Friedman, Pincelli Hull, Gene Hunt, Richard Norris & Matt Friedman
Molecular phylogenies suggest some major radiations of open-ocean fish clades occurred roughly coincident with the K/Pg boundary, however the timing and nature of this diversification is poorly constrained. Here we investigate evolutionary patterns in ray-finned fishes across the Cretaceous-Palaeogene (K/Pg) Mass Extinction 66 million years ago (Ma), using microfossils (isolated teeth) preserved in a South Pacific sediment core spanning 72-43 Ma. Our record does not show significant turnover of fish tooth morphotypes at the K/Pg...

Data from: Extinction risk in extant marine species integrating paleontological and biodistributional data

Katie S. Collins, Stewart M. Edie, Gene Hunt, Kaustuv Roy & David Jablonski
Extinction risk assessments of marine invertebrate species remain scarce, which hinders effective management of marine biodiversity in the face of anthropogenic impacts. In order to close this information gap, we developed a metric of relative extinction risk that combines paleontological data, in the form of extinction rates calculated from the fossil record, with two known correlates of risk in the modern day: geographic range size and realized thermal niche. We test the performance of this...

Data from: Integrating abundance and diet data to improve inferences of food web dynamics

Jake M. Ferguson, , Brianna H. Witteveen, John B. Hopkins & Briana H. Witteveen
1. Both population abundances and chemical tracers are useful tools for studying consumer-resource interactions. Food web models parameterized with abundances are often used to understand how interactions structure communities and to inform management decisions of complex ecological systems. Unfortunately, collecting abundance data to parameterize these models is often expensive and time-consuming. Another approach is to use chemical tracers to estimate the proportional diets of consumers by relating the tracers in their tissues to those found...

Data from: Human-like Cmah inactivation in mice increases running endurance and decreases muscle fatigability: implications for human evolution

Jonathan Okerblom, William Fletes, Hemal H. Patel, Simon Schenk, Ajit Varki & Ellen C. Breen
Compared to other primates, humans are exceptional long-distance runners, a feature that emerged in genus Homo ~2 million years ago (mya) and is classically attributed to anatomical and physiological adaptations such as an enlarged gluteus maximus and improved heat dissipation. However, no underlying genetic changes have currently been defined. Two-three mya, an exon deletion in the CMP-Neu5Ac Hydroxylase (CMAH) gene also became fixed in our ancestral lineage. Cmah loss in mice exacerbates disease severity in...

Oxidative stress and NF-κB signaling are involved in LPS induced pulmonary dysplasia in chick embryos

Yun Long, Guang Wang, Ke Li, Zongyi Zhang, Ping Zhang, Jing Zhang, Xiaotan Zhang, Yongping Bao, Xuesong Yang & Pengcheng Wang
Inflammation or dysbacteriosis-derived lipopolysaccharides (LPS) adversely influence the embryonic development of respiratory system. However, the precise pathological mechanisms still remain to be elucidated. In this study, we demonstrated that LPS exposure caused lung maldevelopment in chick embryos, including higher embryo mortality, increased thickness of alveolar gas exchange zone, and accumulation of PAS+ immature pulmonary cells, accompanied with reduced expression of alveolar epithelial cell markers and lamellar body count. Upon LPS exposure, pulmonary cell proliferation was...

Oxidative Stress and NF-κB signaling are involved in LPS induced pulmonary dysplasia in chick embryos

Yun Long, Guang Wang, Ke Li, Zong-yi Zhang, Ping Zhang, Jing Zhang, Xiao-tan Zhang, Yongping Bao, Xuesong Yang & Peng-cheng Wang
Inflammation or dysbacteriosis-derived lipopolysaccharides (LPS) adversely influence the embryonic development of respiratory system. However, the precise pathological mechanisms still remain to be elucidated. In this study, we demonstrated that LPS exposure caused lung maldevelopment in chick embryos, including higher embryo mortality, increased thickness of alveolar gas exchange zone, and accumulation of PAS+ immature pulmonary cells, accompanied with reduced expression of alveolar epithelial cell markers and lamellar body count. Upon LPS exposure, pulmonary cell proliferation was...

Additional file 1 of RETRACTED ARTICLE: LncRNA PVT1 triggers Cyto-protective autophagy and promotes pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma development via the miR-20a-5p/ULK1 Axis

Fengting Huang, Wenying Chen, Juanfei Peng, Yuanhua Li, Yanyan Zhuang, Zhe Zhu, Chunkui Shao, Wanling Yang, Herui Yao & Shineng Zhang
Figure S1. Expression pattern of ULK1 in a cohort of PDA patients in TCGA and cell lines. Figure S2. PVT1 regulates ULK1 expression in a posttranscriptional manner. Figure S3. Cellular location of PVT1 and miR-20a-5p in PDA cells. Figure S4. miR-20a-5p suppressed PVT1 function. Table S1. Clinicopathological information of 68 PDA patients in detail. Table S2. The PCR primer sequence to detect the target genes. Table S3. The sequence of the shRNAs to diminish the...

Data from: A phylogenomic resolution of the sea urchin tree of life

Nicolás Mongiardino Koch, Simon E. Coppard, Harilaos A. Lessios, Derek E.G. Briggs, Rich Mooi & Greg W. Rouse
Background: Echinoidea is a clade of marine animals including sea urchins, heart urchins, sand dollars and sea biscuits. Found in benthic habitats across all latitudes, echinoids are key components of marine communities such as coral reefs and kelp forests. A little over 1,000 species inhabit the oceans today, a diversity that traces its roots back at least to the Permian. Although much effort has been devoted to elucidating the echinoid tree of life using a...

Data from: Rapid evolution of thermal plasticity in mountain lake Daphnia populations

Hamanda B. Cavalheri, Celia C. Symons, Marika Schulhof, Natalie T. Jones & Jonathan B. Shurin
Populations at risk of extinction due to climate change may be rescued by adaptive evolution or plasticity. Selective agents, such as introduced predators, may enhance or constrain plastic or adaptive responses to temperature. We tested responses of Daphnia to temperature by collecting populations from lakes across an elevational gradient in the presence and absence of fish predators (long-term selection). We subsequently grew these populations at two elevations in field mesocosms over two years (short-term selection),...

Training and Support for Student Library Employees in a Tiered Reference Service Model: Supporting Materials

Brian Quigley, Jeffery Loo, Lisa Ngo, Susan Powell, Samantha Teplitzky, Anna Sackmann & Kortney Rupp
To cultivate students’ reference skills, the Engineering and Physical Sciences Division of the UC Berkeley Library developed an active training program based upon a dynamic online reference manual continuously improved with student feedback. We evaluate the effectiveness of our training program and share procedures and tools for enhancing student training. Students were given a pre-test of reference skills and self-efficacy prior to attending an annual training session. One month afterwards, we distributed a post-test and...

Data from: Social behavior in bees influences the abundance of Sodalis (Enterobacteriaceae) symbionts

Benjamin E. R. Rubin, Jon G. Sanders, Kyle M. Turner, Naomi E. Pierce & Sarah D. Kocher
Social interactions can facilitate transmission of microbes between individuals, reducing variation in gut communities within social groups. Thus, the evolution of social behaviors and symbiont community composition have the potential to be tightly linked. We explored this connection by characterizing the diversity of bacteria associated with both eusocial and solitary bee species within the behaviorally variable family Halictidae using 16S amplicon sequencing. Contrary to expectations, we found few differences in bacterial abundance or variation between...

Supporting Information: Toward learned chemical perception of force field typing rules

Camila Zanette, Caitlin C. Bannan, Christopher I. Bayly, Josh Fass, Michael K. Gilson, Michael R. Shirts, John D. Chodera & David L. Mobley
The Open Force Field Initiative seeks to to automate force field development in order to advance force fields and improve accuracy (openforcefield.org). An important part of this effort includes automating the determination of chemical perception --- that is, the way force field parameters are assigned to a molecule based on chemical environment. We developed a novel technology for this purpose, termed SMARTY. It generalizes atom typing by using direct chemical perception with SMARTS strings adopting...

Data from: Acid secretion by the boring organ of the burrowing giant clam, Tridacna crocea

Richard W. Hill, Eric J. Armstrong, Kazuo Inaba, Masaya Morita, Martin Tresguerres, Jonathon H. Stillman, Jinae N. Roa & Garfield T. Kwan
The giant clam Tridacna crocea, native to Indo-Pacific coral reefs, is noted for its unique ability to bore fully into coral rock and is a major agent of reef bioerosion. However, T. crocea’s mechanism of boring has remained a mystery despite decades of research. By exploiting a new, two-dimensional pH-sensing technology and manipulating clams to press their presumptive boring tissue (the pedal mantle) against pH-sensing foils, we show that this tissue lowers the pH of...

Data from: Destabilizing mutations encode nongenetic variation that drives evolutionary innovation

Katherine L. Petrie, Nathan D. Palmer, Daniel T. Johnson, Sarah J. Medina, Stephanie J. Yan, Victor Li, Alita R. Burmeister & Justin R. Meyer
Evolutionary innovations are often achieved by repurposing existing genes to perform new functions; however, the mechanisms enabling the transition from old to new remain controversial. We identified mutations in bacteriophage λ’s host-recognition gene J that confer enhanced adsorption to λ’s native receptor, LamB, and the ability to access a new receptor, OmpF. The mutations destabilize particles and cause conformational bistability of J, which yields progeny of multiple phenotypic forms, each proficient at different receptors. This...

Data from: Comparative dynamics of microglialand glioma cell motility at the infiltrative margin of brain tumours

Joseph Juliano, Orlando Gil, Andrea Hawkins-Daarud, Sonal Noticewala, Russell C. Rockne, Jill Gallaher, Susan C. Massey, Peter A. Sims, Alexander R. A. Anderson, Kristin R. Swanson & Peter Canoll
Microglia are a major cellular component of gliomas, and abundant in the centre of the tumour and at the infiltrative margins. While glioma is a notoriously infiltrative disease, the dynamics of microglia and glioma migratory patterns have not been well characterized. To investigate the migratory behaviour of microglia and glioma cells at the infiltrative edge, we performed two-colour time-lapse fluorescence microscopy of brain slices generated from a platelet-derived growth factor-B (PDGFB)-driven rat model of glioma,...

Data from: Multi-behavioral endpoint testing of an 87-chemical compound library in freshwater planarians

Siqi Zhang, Danielle Hagstrom, Patrick Hayes, Aaron Graham & Eva-Maria S. Collins
There is an increased recognition in the field of toxicology of the value of medium-to-high-throughput screening methods using in vitro and alternative animal models. We have previously introduced the asexual freshwater planarian Dugesia japonica as a new alternative animal model and proposed that it is particularly well-suited for the study of developmental neurotoxicology. In this paper, we discuss how we have expanded and automated our screening methodology to allow for fast screening of multiple behavioral...

Data from: Before platelets: the production of platelet activating factor during growth and stress in a basal marine organism

Ines Galtier D’Auriac, Robert A. Quinn, Heather Maughan, Louis-Felix Nothias, Mark Little, Clifford A. Kapono, Ana Cobian Guemes, Brandon T. Reyes, Kevin Green, Steven D. Quistad, Matthieu Leray, Jennifer E. Smith, Pieter C. Dorrestein, Forest Rohwer, Dimitri D. Deheyn, Aaron C. Hartmann, Ana Cobian & Ines Galtier D'Auriac
Corals and humans represent two extremely disparate metazoan lineages and are therefore useful for comparative evolutionary studies. Two lipid-based molecules that are central to human immunity, platelet activating factor (PAF) and Lyso-PAF were recently identified in scleractinian corals. To identify processes in corals that involve these molecules, PAF and Lyso-PAF biosynthesis was quantified in conditions known to stimulate PAF production in mammals (tissue growth and exposure to elevated levels of ultraviolet light) and in conditions...

Data from: Deep neural networks for accurate predictions of crystal stability

Weike Ye, Chi Chen, Zhenbin Wang, Iek-Heng Chu & Shyue Ping Ong
Predicting the stability of crystals is one of the central problems in materials science. Today, density functional theory (DFT) calculations remain comparatively expensive and scale poorly with system size. Here we show that deep neural networks utilizing just two descriptors—the Pauling electronegativity and ionic radii—can predict the DFT formation energies of C3A2D3O12 garnets and ABO3 perovskites with low mean absolute errors (MAEs) of 7–10 meV atom−1 and 20–34 meV atom−1, respectively, well within the limits...

Data from: Maternal provisioning is structured by species’ competitive neighborhoods

Rachel M. Germain, Tess N. Grainger, Natalie T. Jones & Benjamin Gilbert
Differential maternal provisioning of offspring in response to environmental conditions has been argued as ‘the missing link’ in plant life histories. Although empirical evidence suggests that maternal provisioning responses to abiotic conditions are common, there is little understanding of how differences in maternal provisioning manifest in response to competition. Frequency manipulations are commonly employed in ecological studies to assess the strength of interspecific competition, relative to intraspecific competition, and we used frequency manipulations to test...

Data from: Revisiting protein aggregation as pathogenic in sporadic Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s diseases

Alberto J. Espay, Joaquin A. Vizcarra, Luca Marsili, Anthony E. Lang, David K. Simon, Aristide Merola, Keith A. Josephs, Alfonso Fasano, Francesca Morgante, Rodolfo Savica, J. Timothy Greenamyre, Franca Cambi, Tritia R. Yamasaki, Caroline M. Tanner, Ziv Gan-Or, Irene Litvan, Ignacio F. Mata, Cyrus P. Zabetian, Patrik Brundin, Hubert H. Fernandez, David G. Standaert, Marcelo A. Kauffman, Michael A. Schwarzschild, S. Pablo Sardi, Todd Sherer … & James B. Leverenz
The gold standard for a definitive diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease (PD) is the pathologic finding of aggregated alpha-synuclein into Lewy bodies and for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) aggregated amyloid into plaques and hyperphosphorylated tau into tangles. Implicit in this clinico-pathologic-based nosology is the assumption that pathological protein aggregation at autopsy reflect pathogenesis at disease onset. While these aggregates may in exceptional cases be on a causal pathway in humans (e.g., aggregated alpha-synuclein in SNCA gene multiplication...

Data from: Social interactions shape individual and collective personality in social spiders

Edmund R. Hunt, Brian Mi, Camila Fernandez, Brandyn M. Wong, Jonathan N. Pruitt & Noa Pinter-Wollman
The behavioural composition of a group and the dynamics of social interactions can both influence how social animals work collectively. For example, individuals exhibiting certain behavioural tendencies may have a disproportionately large impact on the group, and so are referred to as keystone individuals, while interactions between individuals can facilitate information transmission about resources. Despite the potential impact of both behavioural composition and interactions on collective behaviour, the relationship between consistent behaviours, also known as...

Data from: Mutation in the intracellular chloride channel CLCC1 associated with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa

Lin Li, Xiaodong Jiao, Ilaria D’Atri, Fumihito Ono, Ralph Nelson, Chi-Chao Chan, Naoki Nakaya, Zhiwei Ma, Yan Ma, Xiaoying Cai, Longhua Zhang, Siying Lin, Abdul Hameed, Barry A. Chioza, Holly Hardy, Gavin Arno, Sarah Hull, Muhammad Imran Khan, James Fasham, V. Gaurav Harlalka, Michel Michaelides, Anthony T. Moore, Zeynep Hande Coban Akdemir, Shalini Jhangiani, James R. Lupski … & Frans P. M. Cremers
We identified a homozygous missense alteration (c.75C>A, p.D25E) in CLCC1, encoding a presumptive intracellular chloride channel highly expressed in the retina, associated with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP) in eight consanguineous families of Pakistani descent. The p.D25E alteration decreased CLCC1 channel function accompanied by accumulation of mutant protein in granules within the ER lumen, while siRNA knockdown of CLCC1 mRNA induced apoptosis in cultured ARPE-19 cells. TALEN KO in zebrafish was lethal 11 days post...

Data from: Acquisition of obligate mutualist symbionts during the larval stage is not beneficial for a coral host

Aaron Hartmann, Kristen Marhaver, Anke Klueter, Michael Lovci, Collin Closek, Erika Diaz Almeyda, Valerie Chamberland, Frederick Archer, Dimitri Deheyn, Mark Vermeij & Monica Medina
Theory suggests that the direct transmission of endosymbionts from parents to offspring (vertical transmission) in animal hosts is advantageous and evolutionarily stable, yet many host species instead acquire their symbionts from the environment (horizontal acquisition). An outstanding question in marine biology is why some scleractinian corals do not provision their eggs and larvae with the endosymbiotic dinoflagellates that are necessary for a juvenile’s ultimate survival. We tested whether the acquisition of photosynthetic endosymbionts (family Symbiodiniaceae)...

Revenue design thinking: constructing an accelerated cash /phased write down story

Christopher Felker
A well-designed data story is a launch point for revenue cycle professionals using analytics to manage accounts receivable according to portfolio principles. In the last 100 (one hundred) days before the close of a fiscal year, holding accounts receivables too long poses an inordinate risk on the perceived value of UCSD Health's trial balance inventory. In April 2018, we started to design a Tableau dashboard that would more accurately forecast two things First Future free...

Contract design thinking: a service oriented architecture SOA for contract models, maintenance and testing

Christopher Felker & Sue Ahl
Contract variances complicate academic medical center accounts receivables because they are one driver of ambiguity when calculating future free cash flows FFCF [1]. UC Health provides leadership and strategic direction for UC’s five academic medical centers and 18 health professional schools. Contract variations within 1 (one) medical center has a multiplier effect in the consolidated annual financial reporting. In December 2017 we created an internal project charter [2] to consolidate contracts financial accounts receivables activity...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    34

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    34

Affiliations

  • University of California, San Diego
    34
  • Sun Yat-sen University
    4
  • Hong Kong Polytechnic University
    3
  • Beijing Tian Tan Hospital
    3
  • Third Hospital of Hebei Medical University
    3
  • Sixth Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University
    3
  • Guangzhou Center for Disease Control and Prevention
    3
  • Agricultural University of Hebei
    3
  • Zhejiang University
    3
  • Lanzhou Veterinary Research Institute
    3