34 Works

Data from: Acid secretion by the boring organ of the burrowing giant clam, Tridacna crocea

Richard W. Hill, Eric J. Armstrong, Kazuo Inaba, Masaya Morita, Martin Tresguerres, Jonathon H. Stillman, Jinae N. Roa & Garfield T. Kwan
The giant clam Tridacna crocea, native to Indo-Pacific coral reefs, is noted for its unique ability to bore fully into coral rock and is a major agent of reef bioerosion. However, T. crocea’s mechanism of boring has remained a mystery despite decades of research. By exploiting a new, two-dimensional pH-sensing technology and manipulating clams to press their presumptive boring tissue (the pedal mantle) against pH-sensing foils, we show that this tissue lowers the pH of...

Data from: Social behavior in bees influences the abundance of Sodalis (Enterobacteriaceae) symbionts

Benjamin E. R. Rubin, Jon G. Sanders, Kyle M. Turner, Naomi E. Pierce & Sarah D. Kocher
Social interactions can facilitate transmission of microbes between individuals, reducing variation in gut communities within social groups. Thus, the evolution of social behaviors and symbiont community composition have the potential to be tightly linked. We explored this connection by characterizing the diversity of bacteria associated with both eusocial and solitary bee species within the behaviorally variable family Halictidae using 16S amplicon sequencing. Contrary to expectations, we found few differences in bacterial abundance or variation between...

Data from: Rapid evolution of thermal plasticity in mountain lake Daphnia populations

Hamanda B. Cavalheri, Celia C. Symons, Marika Schulhof, Natalie T. Jones & Jonathan B. Shurin
Populations at risk of extinction due to climate change may be rescued by adaptive evolution or plasticity. Selective agents, such as introduced predators, may enhance or constrain plastic or adaptive responses to temperature. We tested responses of Daphnia to temperature by collecting populations from lakes across an elevational gradient in the presence and absence of fish predators (long-term selection). We subsequently grew these populations at two elevations in field mesocosms over two years (short-term selection),...

Data from: A phylogenomic resolution of the sea urchin tree of life

Nicolás Mongiardino Koch, Simon E. Coppard, Harilaos A. Lessios, Derek E.G. Briggs, Rich Mooi & Greg W. Rouse
Background: Echinoidea is a clade of marine animals including sea urchins, heart urchins, sand dollars and sea biscuits. Found in benthic habitats across all latitudes, echinoids are key components of marine communities such as coral reefs and kelp forests. A little over 1,000 species inhabit the oceans today, a diversity that traces its roots back at least to the Permian. Although much effort has been devoted to elucidating the echinoid tree of life using a...

Data design thinking: data cleaning improvements using tableau prep

Christopher Felker
Tableau Prep automatically shows errors and outliers in data and employs fuzzy clustering to help you with the common, repetitive tasks like fixing spellings errors or reconciling entities across data sources. Project Maestro shares the same calc language and governance structure as the rest of Tableau, so you can get started easily. And with a streamlined sharing experience to Tableau Desktop, Tableau Server and Tableau Online, a user can experience data prep and analysis in...

Data from: Gain-of-function experiments in bacteriophage lambda uncover residues under diversifying selection in nature

Rohan Maddamsetti, Daniel T. Johnson, Stephanie J. Spielman, Katherine L. Petrie, Debora S. Marks & Justin R. Meyer
Viral gain-of-function mutations frequently evolve during laboratory experiments. Whether the specific mutations that evolve in the lab also evolve in nature and whether they have the same impact on evolution in the real world is unknown. We studied a model virus, bacteriophage λ, that repeatedly evolves to exploit a new host receptor under typical laboratory conditions. Here we demonstrate that two residues of λ’s J protein are required for the new function. In natural λ...

Oxidative stress and NF-κB signaling are involved in LPS induced pulmonary dysplasia in chick embryos

Yun Long, Guang Wang, Ke Li, Zongyi Zhang, Ping Zhang, Jing Zhang, Xiaotan Zhang, Yongping Bao, Xuesong Yang & Pengcheng Wang
Inflammation or dysbacteriosis-derived lipopolysaccharides (LPS) adversely influence the embryonic development of respiratory system. However, the precise pathological mechanisms still remain to be elucidated. In this study, we demonstrated that LPS exposure caused lung maldevelopment in chick embryos, including higher embryo mortality, increased thickness of alveolar gas exchange zone, and accumulation of PAS+ immature pulmonary cells, accompanied with reduced expression of alveolar epithelial cell markers and lamellar body count. Upon LPS exposure, pulmonary cell proliferation was...

Revenue design thinking: implementing enterprise tableau reporting at UC San Diego Health

Christopher Felker, Sue Ahl & Tiffany Kavanaugh
In February 2018, the authors agreed to participate in an Enterprise Tableau implementation. There were 17 (seventeen) pilot projects identified at UCSD Health. This data pertains to 2 (two) agile data analytics projects Atlas of sustainable operations indicators Contracts maintenance co operative strategy with other UC medical centers The authors committed to becoming certified users of Tableau software ('superusers') capable of assisting in a broader use of data analytics in ongoing business and clinical operations....

Data from: To grunt or not to grunt: factors governing call production in female olive baboons, Papio anubis

Joan B. Silk, Eila R. Roberts, Veronika Staedele, Shirley C. Strum & Veronika Städele
Vocal signals often play an important role in synchronizing the activities of group members, coordinating decisions about when and where to travel, and facilitating social interactions in which there are potential conflicts of interest. In chacma baboons, Papio ursinus, low amplitude grunts facilitate nonaggressive social interactions and reconcile conflicts. Grunts seem to function as signals of benign intent and reduce uncertainty about the signaler's subsequent behavior. Here, we replicate and extend these findings in another...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    34

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    34

Affiliations

  • University of California, San Diego
    34
  • Sun Yat-sen University
    4
  • Hong Kong Polytechnic University
    3
  • Beijing Tian Tan Hospital
    3
  • Third Hospital of Hebei Medical University
    3
  • Sixth Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University
    3
  • Guangzhou Center for Disease Control and Prevention
    3
  • Agricultural University of Hebei
    3
  • Zhejiang University
    3
  • Lanzhou Veterinary Research Institute
    3